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T P Loch, M Faisal
Flavobacterial diseases are significant impediments to hatchery-based fishery conservation and aquaculture productivity worldwide. Recent studies revealed a multitude of novel flavobacteria within the reproductive fluids and unfertilized eggs of feral Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha broodstock, some of which were associated with systemic disease. Herein, embryonated eggs/fry from these broodstock were assayed for flavobacteria while in incubator stacks in three hatcheries over 2 years, as was the water entering hatchery incubators...
March 15, 2018: Journal of Fish Diseases
Neeraj Kumar, Kishore Kumar Krishnani, Sanjay Kumar Gupta, Narendra Pratap Singh
Nanotechnology is a novel arena with promising applications in the field of medicine, industry, and agriculture including fisheries. Cross-disciplinary interactions and the application of this technology in biological systems have led to the innovation of novel nanoparticle antioxidants, which are the subject of our study. In context with above background, we designed an experiment on nano-silver to elucidate its role for mitigation of abiotic and biotic stress. Three diets were formulated viz. silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) incorporated at 0...
March 14, 2018: Environmental Science and Pollution Research International
Pooja Tripathi, Ramachandra Kamath, Rajnarayan Tiwari
Background: Fisherwomen are informal sector workers involved in post-harvest operations and are mostly engaged in peeling, trading, and processing of fish. High degree of wage disparity and gender inequalities results in different socioeconomic status of fisherwomen and fishermen. This study aimed to identify gender issues and their effect on the health status of fisherwomen. Materials and Methods: The present cross-sectional included 171 fishermen and fisherwomen...
May 2017: Indian Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Jade M S Delevaux, Robert Whittier, Kostantinos A Stamoulis, Leah L Bremer, Stacy Jupiter, Alan M Friedlander, Matthew Poti, Greg Guannel, Natalie Kurashima, Kawika B Winter, Robert Toonen, Eric Conklin, Chad Wiggins, Anders Knudby, Whitney Goodell, Kimberly Burnett, Susan Yee, Hla Htun, Kirsten L L Oleson, Tracy Wiegner, Tamara Ticktin
Declining natural resources have led to a cultural renaissance across the Pacific that seeks to revive customary ridge-to-reef management approaches to protect freshwater and restore abundant coral reef fisheries. Effective ridge-to-reef management requires improved understanding of land-sea linkages and decision-support tools to simultaneously evaluate the effects of terrestrial and marine drivers on coral reefs, mediated by anthropogenic activities. Although a few applications have linked the effects of land cover to coral reefs, these are too coarse in resolution to inform watershed-scale management for Pacific Islands...
2018: PloS One
Jennifer C Selgrath, Sarah E Gergel, Amanda C J Vincent
Locally sustainable resource extraction activities, at times, transform into ecologically detrimental enterprises. Understanding such transitions is a primary challenge for conservation and management of many ecosystems. In marine systems, over-exploitation of small-scale fisheries creates problems such as reduced biodiversity and lower catches. However, long-term documentation of how governance and associated changes in fishing gears may have contributed to such declines is often lacking. Using fisher interviews, we characterized fishing gear dynamics over 60 years (1950-2010) in a coral reef ecosystem in the Philippines subject to changing fishing regulations...
2018: PloS One
J K Pinnegar
The damselfish Chromis chromis is typically the most abundant fish species in the rocky littoral environment of the Mediterranean Sea, where it feeds in huge shoals on incoming zooplankton and rests near the seabed each night. Research has shown that large populations of C. chromis play a fundamental role by transferring carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus directly from the pelagic system to the littoral in the form of solid and liquid wastes and therefore that this species acts as a vital conduit for nutrients...
March 2018: Journal of Fish Biology
J R Paris, K D Sherman, E Bell, C Boulenger, C Delord, M B M El-Mahdi, E A Fairfield, A M Griffiths, C Gutmann Roberts, R D Hedger, L E Holman, L H Hooper, N E Humphries, I Katsiadaki, R A King, A Lemopoulos, C J Payne, G Peirson, K K Richter, M I Taylor, C N Trueman, B Hayden, J R Stevens
Wild fish populations are currently experiencing unprecedented pressures, which are projected to intensify in the coming decades. Developing a thorough understanding of the influences of both biotic and abiotic factors on fish populations is a salient issue in contemporary fish conservation and management. During the 50th Anniversary Symposium of The Fisheries Society of the British Isles at the University of Exeter, UK, in July 2017, scientists from diverse research backgrounds gathered to discuss key topics under the broad umbrella of 'Understanding Fish Populations'...
March 2018: Journal of Fish Biology
A Jacobs, C Doran, D S Murray, J Duffill Telsnig, K L Laskowski, N A R Jones, S K Auer, K Praebel
Many fish species face increasing challenges associated with climate change and overfishing. At the same time, aquaculture is becoming vital for food security. Gaining a deeper understanding of the basic biology of fish is therefore more important than ever. Here we synthesize and summarize key questions, opportunities and challenges in fish biology highlighted during a round-table discussion at the 50th Anniversary Symposium of The Fisheries Society of the British Isles, held at the University of Exeter, U...
March 2018: Journal of Fish Biology
T A C Gordon, H R Harding, F K Clever, I K Davidson, W Davison, D W Montgomery, R C Weatherhead, F M Windsor, J D Armstrong, A Bardonnet, E Bergman, J R Britton, I M Côté, D D'agostino, L A Greenberg, A R Harborne, K K Kahilainen, N B Metcalfe, S C Mills, N J Milner, F H Mittermayer, L Montorio, S L Nedelec, J M Prokkola, L A Rutterford, A G V Salvanes, S D Simpson, A Vainikka, J K Pinnegar, E M Santos
Populations of fishes provide valuable services for billions of people, but face diverse and interacting threats that jeopardize their sustainability. Human population growth and intensifying resource use for food, water, energy and goods are compromising fish populations through a variety of mechanisms, including overfishing, habitat degradation and declines in water quality. The important challenges raised by these issues have been recognized and have led to considerable advances over past decades in managing and mitigating threats to fishes worldwide...
March 2018: Journal of Fish Biology
W W L Cheung
This paper aims to highlight the risk of climate change on coupled marine human and natural systems and explore possible solutions to reduce such risk. Specifically, it explores some of the key responses of marine fish stocks and fisheries to climate change and their implications for human society. It highlights the importance of mitigating carbon emission and achieving the Paris Agreement in reducing climate risk on marine fish stocks and fisheries. Finally, it discusses potential opportunities for helping fisheries to reduce climate threats, through local adaptation...
March 2018: Journal of Fish Biology
A G V Salvanes, M J Gibbons
The oceans of the world are slowly losing oxygen, in part because of climate change and in part because of anthropogenic eutrophication. This deoxygenation affects marine organisms in species-specific ways. This paper reviews what is known on how hypoxia tolerant species respond to low dissolved oxygen, using the bearded goby Sufflogobius bibarbatus as a model system. This species is endemic to the Benguela upwelling ecosystem, where, off Namibia, 9000 km2 of the shelf is hypoxic. Here, the species is now considered central to ecosystem functioning and in recent decades it has sustained commercial fisheries...
March 2018: Journal of Fish Biology
Éverton L Vogt, Jorge F A Model, Anapaula S Vinagre
Organotins (OTs) are considered some of the most toxic chemicals introduced into aquatic environments by anthropogenic activities. They are widely used for agricultural and industrial purposes and as antifouling additives on boat hull's paints. Even though the use of OTs was banned in 2008, elevated levels of OTs can still be detected in aquatic environments. OTs' deleterious effects upon wildlife and experimental animals are well documented and include endocrine disruption, immunotoxicity, neurotoxicity, genotoxicity, and metabolic dysfunction...
2018: Frontiers in Endocrinology
Ana Paula Barbosa Martins, Leonardo Manir Feitosa, Rosangela Paula Lessa, Zafira Silva Almeida, Michelle Heupel, Wagner Macedo Silva, Ligia Tchaicka, Jorge Luiz Silva Nunes
Increasing fishing effort has caused declines in shark populations worldwide. Understanding biological and ecological characteristics of sharks is essential to effectively implement management measures, but to fully understand drivers of fishing pressure social factors must be considered through multidisciplinary and integrated approaches. The present study aimed to use fisher and trader knowledge to describe the shark catch and product supply chain in Northeastern Brazil, and evaluate perceptions regarding the regional conservation status of shark species...
2018: PloS One
Abeer A Alm-Eldeen, Thoria Donia, Salma Alzahaby
Heavy metals are the most dangerous hazards affecting aquatic biota in Egypt specially the Nile Tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, which is an important species in commercial fisheries. Some areas were not fully studied to screen the hazards that may affect this economic fish. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the potential hazards of heavy metals on O. niloticus in Al-Gharbiya Governorate in the Middle delta of Egypt. Water and fish samples were collected from Al-Qased canal, Kafr El-Zayaat Nile, El-Maash canal in Al-Gharbiya Governorate plus a reference site which is a fish farm at the Faculty of Agriculture, Damietta University, Damitta Governorate, Egypt...
March 12, 2018: Environmental Science and Pollution Research International
Francesco Ferretti, David Curnick, Keli Liu, Evgeny V Romanov, Barbara A Block
Scientific monitoring has recorded only a recent fraction of the oceans' alteration history. This biases our understanding of marine ecosystems. Remote coral reef ecosystems are often considered pristine because of high shark abundance. However, given the long history and global nature of fishing, sharks' vulnerability, and the ecological consequences of shark declines, these states may not be natural. In the Chagos archipelago, one of the remotest coral reef systems on the planet, protected by a very large marine reserve, we integrated disparate fisheries and scientific survey data to reconstruct baselines and long-term population trajectories of two dominant sharks...
March 2018: Science Advances
Mallory Van Wyngaarden, Paul V R Snelgrove, Claudio DiBacco, Lorraine C Hamilton, Naiara Rodríguez-Ezpeleta, Luyao Zhan, Robert G Beiko, Ian R Bradbury
Environmental factors can influence diversity and population structure in marine species and accurate understanding of this influence can both improve fisheries management and help predict responses to environmental change. We used 7163 SNPs derived from restriction site-associated DNA sequencing genotyped in 245 individuals of the economically important sea scallop, Placopecten magellanicus , to evaluate the correlations between oceanographic variation and a previously identified latitudinal genomic cline...
March 2018: Ecology and Evolution
Gabriella Di Lena, Irene Casini, Roberto Caproni, Elena Orban
This study investigated mercury contamination levels in eight commercially valuable Crustacean species caught off the Central Adriatic and Tyrrhenian coasts of Italy. Total mercury levels were measured by Thermal Decomposition-Amalgamation-Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry. Results showed a high variability among species with values ranging between 0.070 and 1.24 (mg kg-1 wet weight). The lowest mercury levels were detected in caramote prawn (Penaeus kerathurus), warty crab (Eriphia verrucosa) and European spider crab (Maja squinado), decapods living in shallow waters...
March 12, 2018: Food Additives & Contaminants. Part B, Surveillance
John S S Denton
The mesopelagic (midwater) and deep-sea environments together comprise over 90% of the volume of the world ocean [1] and provide services that are only recently becoming recognized [2]. One of the most significant of these services relates to midwater fish biomass, recently estimated to be two orders of magnitude larger than the current worldwide fisheries catch [3, 4]. Calls to exploit midwater fish biomass have increased despite warnings about the unknown recovery potential of such organisms [2] and despite existing data suggesting that deep-sea fishes could be classified as endangered [5]...
March 3, 2018: Current Biology: CB
Michael G Sorice, C Josh Donlan, Kevin J Boyle, Weibin Xu, Stefan Gelcich
Payments for ecosystem services programs have become common tools but most have failed to achieve wide-ranging conservation outcomes. The capacity for scale and impact increases when PES programs are designed through the lens of the potential participants, yet this has received little attention in research or practice. Our work with small-scale marine fisheries integrates the social science of PES programs and provides a framework for designing programs that focus a priori on scaling. In addition to payments, desirable non-monetary program attributes and ecological feedbacks attract a wider range of potential participants into PES programs, including those who have more negative attitudes and lower trust...
2018: PloS One
Brooke J Vetter, Marybeth K Brey, Allen F Mensinger
Silver (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) and bighead (H. nobilis) carp (collectively bigheaded carp) are invasive fish that threaten aquatic ecosystems in the upper Midwest United States and the Laurentian Great Lakes. Controlling bigheaded carp is a priority of fisheries managers and one area of focus involves developing acoustic deterrents to prevent upstream migration. For an acoustic deterrent to be effective however, the hearing ability of bigheaded carp must be characterized. A previous study showed that bigheaded carp detected sound up to 3 kHz but this range is narrower than what has been reported for other ostariophysans...
2018: PloS One
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