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Nurse work engagement

Jane Mills, Jennifer Chamberlain-Salaun, Helena Harrison, Karen Yates, Andrea O'Shea
BACKGROUND: A core objective of the Australian health system is to provide high quality, safe health care that meets the needs of all Australians. To achieve this, an adequate and effective workforce must support the delivery of care. With rapidly changing health care systems and consumer demographics, demand for care is increasing and retention of sufficient numbers of skilled staff is now a critical priority to meet current and future health care demands. Nurses are the largest cohort of professionals within the health workforce...
2016: BMC Nursing
Jeannette Pols
This article is a written version of the lecture for the IPONS conference in Stockholm. The article starts from the claim that there is no such thing as technology, only different variations of technologies. These technologies, plural, all have their specific workings that we can only learn about by studying these empirically, by analysing the relations between people and their technologies. These relations are always unpredictable, as it is not given beforehand what values the participants pursue. Studying and understanding the workings of healthcare technology is a crucial task for nursing studies, as nurses are often key actors in making these devices work...
October 18, 2016: Nursing Philosophy: An International Journal for Healthcare Professionals
Kelly W Reeves, Yhenneko Taylor, Hazel Tapp, Thomas Ludden, Lindsay E Shade, Beth Burton, Cheryl Courtlandt, Michael Dulin
OBJECTIVE: Asthma is a common childhood chronic lung disease affecting greater than 10% of children in the United States. School nurses are in a unique position to close gaps in care. Indeed, effective asthma management is more likely to result when providers, family, and schools work together to optimize the patient's treatment plan. Currently, effective communication between schools and healthcare systems through electronic medical record (EMR) systems remains a challenge. The goal of this feasibility pilot was to link the school-based care team with primary care providers in the healthcare system network via electronic communication through the EMR, on behalf of pediatric asthma patients who had been hospitalized for an asthma exacerbation...
October 19, 2016: Applied Clinical Informatics
Deborah Edwards, Sally Anstey, Daniel Kelly, Jessica Ballie, Jane Hopkinson
AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore the views of student nurses' and stakeholders of what is important for student nurses to know about cancer treatment and care. BACKGROUND: Worldwide, the number of people living with cancer is increasing because the population is aging and effective cancer treatments are prolonging survival. All nurses need knowledge, skills, confidence and competence to support people living with cancer. Education is an important tool in preparing a nursing workforce that can support people affected by cancer...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Clinical Nursing
Christopher Patterson, Moira Stephens, Vico Chiang, Ann M Price, Fiona Work, Erna Snelgrove-Clarke
BACKGROUND: Personal learning environments (PLEs) have been shown to be a critical part of how students negotiate and manage their own learning. Understandings of PLEs appear to be constrained by narrow definitions that focus primarily on technological engagement with a range of web tools and associated applications. This paper addresses a gap in the literature around PLEs for students currently enrolled in undergraduate nursing degrees. PURPOSE: To provide in-depth insights into how undergraduate students of nursing manage and experience their learning...
September 26, 2016: Nurse Education Today
Susan L Taylor, Jeanne M Leffers
AIM: The aim of the research is to review all qualitative research studies related to service-learning assessment in nursing education. BACKGROUND: Recent literature reviews have examined quantitative but not qualitative research studies on service-learning assessment in nursing education. METHOD: An integrative review analyzed the results of published qualitative research of service-learning assessment. Articles included in this review were published in English in peer-reviewed journals from 1997 to 2014 and encompassed information on outcomes, assessment or evaluation, nursing education, and service-learning...
July 2016: Nursing Education Perspectives
Michael I Brener, Jeremy A Epstein, Jeremy Cho, Hsin-Chieh Yeh, Robert A Dudas, Leonard Feldman
BACKGROUND: Patients often cannot recognise the names and faces of providers involved in their hospital care. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine whether photographs of a patient's providers (physicians and ancillary support staff) using the FACES (Faces of All Clinically Engaged Staff) instrument would increase recognition of the healthcare team, improve the perception of teamwork, and enhance patient satisfaction. METHODS: Cluster randomised controlled trial with patients admitted to four adult internal medicine services of an urban, tertiary care hospital...
October 14, 2016: International Journal of Clinical Practice
T Shaw, P Yates, B Moore, K Ash, L Nolte, M Krishnasamy, J Nicholson, M Rynderman, J Avery, M Jefford
Cancer survivorship is recognised globally as a key issue. In spite of the key role played by nurses in survivorship care, there is an identified gap in nurse's knowledge in this area. This study reports on the development and evaluation of an educational resource for nurses working with people affected by cancer. The resource was designed using adult learning principles and includes a variety of learning materials and point of care resources. A mixed-methods sequential exploratory design was used to undertake an evaluation of the programme...
October 10, 2016: European Journal of Cancer Care
Marie L Campbell, Janet M Rankin
Institutional ethnography (IE) is used to examine transformations in a professional nurse's work associated with her engagement with a hospital's electronic health record (EHR) which is being updated to integrate professional caregiving and produce more efficient and effective health care. We review in the technical and scholarly literature the practices and promises of information technology and, especially of its applications in health care, finding useful the more critical and analytic perspectives. Among the latter, scholarship on the activities of economising is important to our inquiry into the actual activities that transform 'things' (in our case, nursing knowledge and action) into calculable information for objective and financially relevant decision-making...
October 10, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
Cynthia M Clark
This article presents an evidence-based approach to integrate concepts of civility, professionalism, and ethical practice into nursing curricula to prepare students to foster healthy work environments and ensure safe patient care. The author provides evidence to support this approach and includes suggestions for new student orientation, strategies for the first day of class, exemplars for incorporating active learning strategies to enhance student engagement, an emphasis on positive faculty role modeling, and suggestions for curricular integration...
October 4, 2016: Nurse Educator
Elisabeth Coyne, Karin B Dieperink
BACKGROUND: The nurses' ability to provide supportive care to the patient and the family is influenced by their family assessment skills, which provide them with understanding of the family needs and strengths. When a patient is diagnosed with cancer, it is the family who provides the long-term support for the patient, and nurses need to understand the family needs in order to provide holistic care. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the present study is to understand the factors that influence nurses' family assessment practices in adult oncology setting in Denmark and Australia...
October 10, 2016: Supportive Care in Cancer: Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer
Lucia K Gonzales, Dale Glaser, Lois Howland, Mary Jo Clark, Susie Hutchins, Karen Macauley, Jacqueline F Close, Noelle Lipkin Leveque, Kim Reina Failla, Raelene Brooks, Jillian Ward
BACKGROUND: A number of studies across different disciplines have investigated students' learning styles. Differences are known to exist between graduate and baccalaureate nursing students. However, few studies have investigated the learning styles of students in graduate entry nursing programs. . OBJECTIVES: Study objective was to describe graduate entry nursing students' learning styles. DESIGN/SETTING/PARTICIPANTS/METHODS: A descriptive design was used for this study...
September 28, 2016: Nurse Education Today
Angel K Chen, Josette Rivera, Nicole Rotter, Emily Green, Susan Kools
With the shift towards interprofessional education to promote collaborative practice, clinical preceptors are increasingly working with trainees from various professions to provide patient care. It is unclear whether and how preceptors modify their existing precepting approach when working with trainees from other professions. There is little information on strategies for this type of precepting, and how preceptors may foster or impede interprofessional collaboration. The purpose of this qualitative description pilot study was to identify current methods preceptors use to teach trainees from other professions in the clinical setting, particularly advanced practice nursing and medical trainees, and to identify factors that support or impede this type of precepting...
September 28, 2016: Nurse Education in Practice
A Williams, D Sell, K Oulton, N Wilson, J Wray, F Gibson
AIM: The objective of this study was to undertake a research priority setting exercise with the aim of maximizing efficiency and impact in research activity undertaken by nurses at one children's tertiary healthcare institution by ensuring the clinical staff directly shaped a coherent, transparent and consensus driven nurse-led research agenda. BACKGROUND: In Round 1, the research topics of 147 nurses were elicited using a modified nominal group technique as the consensus method...
October 4, 2016: Child: Care, Health and Development
Paola Ferri, Matteo Guadi, Luigi Marcheselli, Sara Balduzzi, Daniela Magnani, Rosaria Di Lorenzo
BACKGROUND: Shift work is considered necessary to ensure continuity of care in hospitals and residential facilities. In particular, the night shift is one of the most frequent reasons for the disruption of circadian rhythms, causing significant alterations of sleep and biological functions that can affect physical and psychological well-being and negatively impact work performance. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to highlight if shift work with nights, as compared with day work only, is associated with risk factors predisposing nurses to poorer health conditions and lower job satisfaction...
2016: Risk Management and Healthcare Policy
Scott A Berkowitz, Patricia Brown, Daniel J Brotman, Amy Deutschendorf, Linda Dunbar, Anita Everett, Debra Hickman, Eric Howell, Leon Purnell, Carol Sylvester, Ray Zollinger, Michele Bellantoni, Samuel C Durso, Constantine Lyketsos, Paul Rothman
To address the challenging health care needs of the population served by an urban academic medical center, we developed the Johns Hopkins Community Health Partnership (J-CHiP), a novel care coordination program that provides services in homes, community clinics, acute care hospitals, emergency departments, and skilled nursing facilities. This case study describes a comprehensive program that includes: a community-based intervention using multidisciplinary care teams that work closely with the patient's primary care provider; an acute care intervention bundle with collaborative team-based care; and a skilled nursing facility intervention emphasizing standardized transitions and targeted use of care pathways...
September 29, 2016: Healthcare
Mary Casey, Adeline Cooney, Rhona O' Connell, Josephine Hegarty, Anne-Marie Brady, Pauline O'Reilly, Catriona Kennedy, Elizabeth Heffernan, Gerard Fealy, Martin Mcnamara, Laserina O' Connor
AIM: To present the qualitative findings from a study on the development of scheme(s) to provide evidence of maintenance of professional competence for nurses and midwives. BACKGROUND: Key issues in maintenance of professional competence include notions of self- assessment, verification of engagement and practice hours, provision of an evidential record, the role of the employer and articulation of possible consequences for non-adherence with the requirements. Schemes to demonstrate the maintenance of professional competence have application to nurses, midwives and regulatory bodies and healthcare employers worldwide...
September 29, 2016: Journal of Advanced Nursing
Joanne Brooke, Sharon Herring
Improving care for people with dementia in acute hospitals is a priority in the UK. The Royal Berkshire Hospital in Reading has implemented a range of initiatives, including environmental changes to older people's care wards, development of workforce skills and knowledge, engagement with third sector providers, use of volunteers, and the development of an activities care crew. This article focuses on the work of the activities care crew. The care crew formation, using monies from vacant posts, has supported the provision of one-to-one nursing and engagement of patients in meaningful activities...
September 29, 2016: Nursing Older People
Melissa O╩╝Connor, Angelina Arcamone, Frances Amorim, Mary Beth Hoban, Regina M Boyd, Lauren Fowler, Theresa Marcelli, Jacalyn Smith, Kathleen Nassar, M Louise Fitzpatrick
Management and facilitation of care transitions from hospital to alternative settings requires skill and attention to avoid adverse events. Several interprofessional organizations and nurse leaders have called for the expansion and redesign of undergraduate nursing curricula to include care transitions. Yet there is little evidence describing how undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students are educated on this critical topic or how successful they are in improving student knowledge about care transitions. To address this gap, an in-classroom and clinical experience was implemented to prepare students to manage and facilitate care transitions from the hospital to alternative settings-including the home...
October 2016: Home Healthcare Now
Michael Jones, Julie Gassaway
OBJECTIVE: Peer support is an important adjunct to clinical care for people with disabilities, and may help address barriers to community reintegration. Peers offer positive role models and the benefit of learning from shared experiences of living with disability. Despite potential benefits, peer support is not consistently integrated in the rehabilitation process. This presentation describes three interventions recommended by patients, and directed by peer mentors, to promote successful community transition after rehabilitation for traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI)...
September 2016: Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
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