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self regulated learning

Tonje Holte Stea, Tommy Haugen, Sveinung Berntsen, Vigdis Guttormsen, Nina Cecilie Øverby, Kristin Haraldstad, Eivind Meland, Eirik Abildsnes
BACKGROUND: In light of the high prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity, there is a need of developing effective prevention programs to address the rising prevalence and the concomitant health consequences. The main aim of the present study is to systematically develop and implement a tailored family-based intervention for improving lifestyle habits among overweight and obese children, aged 6-10 years old, enhancing parental self-efficacy, family engagement and parent-child interaction...
October 18, 2016: BMC Public Health
Rebecca M Stanley, Rachel A Jones, Dylan P Cliff, Stewart G Trost, Donna Berthelsen, Jo Salmon, Marijka Batterham, Simon Eckermann, John J Reilly, Ngiare Brown, Karen J Mickle, Steven J Howard, Trina Hinkley, Xanne Janssen, Paul Chandler, Penny Cross, Fay Gowers, Anthony D Okely
BACKGROUND: Participation in regular physical activity (PA) during the early years helps children achieve healthy body weight and can substantially improve motor development, bone health, psychosocial health and cognitive development. Despite common assumptions that young children are naturally active, evidence shows that they are insufficiently active for health and developmental benefits. Exploring strategies to increase physical activity in young children is a public health and research priority...
October 19, 2016: BMC Public Health
Elizabeth B Owens, Stephen P Hinshaw
Using a sample of 228 females with and without childhood attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder followed prospectively across 16 years, we measured childhood neurocognitive vulnerability via executive dysfunction using teacher-reported cognitive and learning problems. We then ascertained relations between dimensionally measured internalizing and externalizing psychopathology during adulthood and showed that childhood neurocognitive vulnerability reliably predicted such associated psychopathology. We identified six serial mediation pathways from childhood neurocognitive vulnerability to adult psychopathology through three early- and late-adolescent domains: individual (self-control and delay of gratification), peer (rejection/conflict and acceptance/friendship), and school (academic performance and school failure)...
November 2016: Development and Psychopathology
Tolga Erdogan, Nuray Senemoglu
Self-regulation is an individual's influence, orientation, and control over his/her own behaviors. The primary aim of this study was to develop and validate a self-report scale on self-regulation that encompasses both cognitive and motivational factors. The validity and reliability studies of the scale were examined on responses of 872 university students. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses confirmed the hypothesized model of self-regulated skills in learning. The scale has 67 items and the factor loadings range from 0...
2016: SpringerPlus
A Carson, L Ludwig, K Welch
In this chapter we review key psychologic theories that have been mooted as possible explanations for the etiology of functional neurologic symptoms, conversion disorder, and hysteria. We cover Freudian psychoanalysis and later object relations and attachment theories, social theories, illness behavior, classic and operant conditioning, social learning theory, self-regulation theory, cognitive-behavioral theories, and mindfulness. Dissociation and modern cognitive neuroscience theories are covered in other chapters in this series and, although of central importance, are omitted from this chapter...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
Shalini Paruthi, Lee J Brooks, Carolyn D'Ambrosio, Wendy A Hall, Suresh Kotagal, Robin M Lloyd, Beth A Malow, Kiran Maski, Cynthia Nichols, Stuart F Quan, Carol L Rosen, Matthew M Troester, Merrill S Wise
Members of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine developed consensus recommendations for the amount of sleep needed to promote optimal health in children and adolescents using a modified RAND Appropriateness Method. After review of 864 published articles, the following sleep durations are recommended: Infants 4 months to 12 months should sleep 12 to 16 hours per 24 hours (including naps) on a regular basis to promote optimal health. Children 1 to 2 years of age should sleep 11 to 14 hours per 24 hours (including naps) on a regular basis to promote optimal health...
September 29, 2016: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine: JCSM: Official Publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine
Charles Preston, Harinder S Chahal, Analia Porrás, Lucette Cargill, Maryam Hinds, Babatunde Olowokure, Rudolph Cummings, James Hospedales
Improving basic capacities for regulation of medicines and health technologies through regulatory systems strengthening is particularly challenging in resource-constrained settings. "Regionalization"-an approach in which countries with common histories, cultural values, languages, and economic conditions work together to establish more efficient systems-may be one answer. This report describes the Caribbean Regulatory System (CRS), a regionalization initiative being implemented in the mostly small countries of the Caribbean Community and Common Market (CARICOM)...
May 2016: Revista Panamericana de Salud Pública, Pan American Journal of Public Health
Hanin Rashid, Robert Lebeau, Norma Saks, Anna T Cianciolo, Anthony R Artino, Judy A Shea, Olle Ten Cate
This Conversation Starters article presents a selected research abstract from the 2016 Association of American Medical Colleges Northeast Region Group on Educational Affairs annual spring meeting. The abstract is paired with the integrative commentary of three experts who shared their thoughts stimulated by the pilot study. These thoughts explore the metacognitive, social, and environmental mechanisms whereby advice plays a role in self-regulated learning.
October 2016: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
Eva van de Weijer-Bergsma, Lex Wijnroks, Ingrid C van Haastert, Jan Boom, Marian J Jongmans
OBJECTIVE: Problems in early development of executive functioning may underlie the vulnerability and individual variability of infants born preterm for behavioral and learning problems. Parenting behaviors may aggravate or temper this increased risk for dysfunction. This study assessed how maternal parenting behaviors predict individual differences in early development of executive functioning in infants born preterm, and whether this varies with infant temperament, i.e., self-regulation...
September 27, 2016: Early Human Development
Mary Casey, Adeline Cooney, Rhona O' Connell, Josephine Hegarty, Anne-Marie Brady, Pauline O'Reilly, Catriona Kennedy, Elizabeth Heffernan, Gerard Fealy, Martin Mcnamara, Laserina O' Connor
AIM: To present the qualitative findings from a study on the development of scheme(s) to provide evidence of maintenance of professional competence for nurses and midwives. BACKGROUND: Key issues in maintenance of professional competence include notions of self- assessment, verification of engagement and practice hours, provision of an evidential record, the role of the employer and articulation of possible consequences for non-adherence with the requirements. Schemes to demonstrate the maintenance of professional competence have application to nurses, midwives and regulatory bodies and healthcare employers worldwide...
September 29, 2016: Journal of Advanced Nursing
Johannes L Hatfield
The purpose of the present mixed method study was to investigate personal benefits, perceptions, and the effect of a 15-week sport psychological skills training program adapted for musicians. The program was individually tailored for six music performance students with the objective of facilitating the participants' instrumental practice and performance. The participants learnt techniques such as goal setting, attentional focus, arousal regulation, imagery, and acceptance training/self-talk. Zimmerman's (1989) cyclical model of self-regulated learning was applied as a theoretical frame for the intervention...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
Leah E Robinson, Kara K Palmer, Kristen L Bub
Self-regulatory skills are broadly defined as the ability to manage emotions, focus attention, and inhibit some behaviors while activating others in accordance with social expectations and are an established indicator of academic success. Growing evidence links motor skills and physical activity to self-regulation. This study examined the efficacy of a motor skills intervention (i.e., the Children's Health Activity Motor Program, CHAMP) that is theoretically grounded in Achievement Goal Theory on motor skill performance and self-regulation in Head Start preschoolers...
2016: Frontiers in Public Health
Christoph Dybowski, Levente Kriston, Sigrid Harendza
BACKGROUND: High teaching quality and students' corresponding learning progress are the most important indicators of teachers' work performance. Theory and numerous empirical studies indicate that self-efficacy, a person's belief in her or his ability to accomplish a task, is an important predictor of work performance. Accordingly, it can be assumed that teaching self-efficacy also influences teaching performance and students' learning progress with regard to physicians who teach in undergraduate medical education...
2016: BMC Medical Education
Yu Zhang, Lirong Wang, Zhiwei Feng, Haizi Cheng, Terence Francis McGuire, Yahui Ding, Tao Cheng, Yingdai Gao, Xiang-Qun Xie
Given the capacity of self-renewal and multilineage differentiation, stem cells are promising sources for use in regenerative medicines as well as in the clinical treatment of certain hematological malignancies and degenerative diseases. Complex networks of cellular signaling pathways largely determine stem cell fate and function. Small molecules that modulate these pathways can provide important biological and pharmacological insights. However, it is still challenging to identify the specific protein targets of these compounds, to explore the changes in stem cell phenotypes induced by compound treatment and to ascertain compound mechanisms of action...
October 7, 2016: Journal of Chemical Information and Modeling
Roghayeh Gandomkar, Azim Mirzazadeh, Mohammad Jalili, Kamran Yazdani, Ladan Fata, John Sandars
OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to identify the self-regulated learning (SRL) processes of medical students during a biomedical science learning task and to examine the associations of the SRL processes with previous performance in biomedical science examinations and subsequent performance on a learning task. METHODS: A sample of 76 Year 1 medical students were recruited based on their performance in biomedical science examinations and stratified into previous high and low performers...
October 2016: Medical Education
Amelia Kehoe, John McLachlan, Jane Metcalf, Simon Forrest, Madeline Carter, Jan Illing
CONTEXT: Many health services and systems rely on the contribution of international medical graduates (IMGs) to the workforce. However, concern has grown around their regulation and professional practice. There is a need, in the absence of strong evidence and a robust theoretical base, for a deeper understanding of the efficacy of interventions used to support IMGs' transition to their host countries. This study seeks to explore and synthesise evidence relating to interventions developed for IMGs...
October 2016: Medical Education
David A Cook, Anthony R Artino
OBJECTIVE: To succinctly summarise five contemporary theories about motivation to learn, articulate key intersections and distinctions among these theories, and identify important considerations for future research. RESULTS: Motivation has been defined as the process whereby goal-directed activities are initiated and sustained. In expectancy-value theory, motivation is a function of the expectation of success and perceived value. Attribution theory focuses on the causal attributions learners create to explain the results of an activity, and classifies these in terms of their locus, stability and controllability...
October 2016: Medical Education
Hans-Christian Jabusch
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
Charles P Gabel, Natalie Rando, Markus Melloh
To ascertain the effectiveness of slacklining as a supplementary therapy for elderly stroke patients who are functionally non-progressing. This case study involved an 18-mo prospective observation of the management of an 87-year-old female stroke-patient of the left hemisphere with reduced balance, reduced lower limb muscular activation, hypertonia, and concurrent postural deficits. This entailed the initial acute care phase through to discharge to home and 18-mo final status in her original independent living setting...
August 18, 2016: World Journal of Orthopedics
Gavin T L Brown, Elizabeth R Peterson, Esther S Yao
BACKGROUND: Lecturers give feedback on assessed work in the hope that students will take it on board and use it to help regulate their learning for the next assessment. However, little is known about how students' conceptions of feedback relate to students' self-regulated learning and self-efficacy beliefs and academic performance. AIMS: This study explores student beliefs about the role and purpose of feedback and the relationship of those beliefs to self-reported self-regulation and self-efficacy, and achievement...
September 9, 2016: British Journal of Educational Psychology
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