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Internal jugular vein

Adam Domonkos Tarnoki, Andrea Agnes Molnar, David Laszlo Tarnoki, Levente Littvay, Emanuela Medda, Corrado Fagnani, Antonio Arnolfi, Filippo Farina, Claudio Baracchini, Giorgio Meneghetti, Giacomo Pucci, Giuseppe Schillaci, Maria Antonietta Stazi, György L Nadasy
AIMS: The elasticity of the internal jugular vein (IJV) is a major determinant of cerebral venous drainage and right atrium venous return. However, the level of genetic determination of IJV dimensions, compliance and distensibility has not been studied yet. METHODS: 170 adult Caucasian twins (43 monozygotic [MZ] and 42 dizygotic [DZ] pairs) were involved from the Italian twin registry. Anteroposterior and mediolateral diameters of the IJV were measured bilaterally by ultrasonography...
2018: PloS One
Myung Gyu Song, Tae-Seok Seo, Yun Hwan Kim, Sung Bum Cho, Hwan Hoon Chung, Seung Hwa Lee, Euichul Jung
The effect of catheter diameter on left innominate vein stenosis in breast cancer patients after totally implantable venous access port placement. PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of catheter diameter on left innominate vein stenosis in breast cancer patients after placement of totally implantable venous access ports. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Totally implantable venous access ports were placed via the left internal jugular vein in 241 women with right breast cancer from January 2010 to December 2014 (mean age, 51...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Vascular Access
Eriko Uchida, Shoji Saito, Tatsuo Watanabe, Takashi Kurata, Kazuo Sakashita
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 19, 2018: Journal of Pediatric Hematology/oncology
Maxim Yu Rykov, Sergei V Zaborovskij, Alexander N Shvecov, Vladimir V Shukin
PURPOSE: To review our experience with peripherally inserted central catheters in pediatric cancer patients. METHODS: The analysis included 353 patients (3 months up to 17 years, mean age 11.2 years) with a variety of cancers diseases, which in 2011-2016, 354 peripherally inserted central catheters were placed. All settings are carried out using ultrasound guidance. In 138 (39%) patients, external anatomical landmarks were used and in 216 (61%) intraoperative fluoroscopy...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Vascular Access
Andre S Madsen, John L Bruce, George V Oosthuizen, Wanda Bekker, Grant L Laing, Damian L Clarke
BACKGROUND: This paper reviews our experience with penetrating cervical venous trauma and aims to validate the selective non-operative management (SNOM) of these injuries. METHODS: This was a retrospective review of a prospectively maintained registry. All patients presenting alive with an injury to the internal jugular vein, subclavian vein or innominate vein following a PNI were reviewed for a 6-year period. RESULTS: Among 817 patients admitted for the management of PNI, 76 (9...
March 15, 2018: World Journal of Surgery
Elise Chua, Valerie Udom, Dean Y Huang
We report the case of a 48-year-old man with a right fusiform internal jugular venous aneurysm, presenting as a unilateral painless neck swelling on coughing or laughing. This is a rare condition, more commonly seen in the paediatric population and can be diagnosed using non-invasive modalities such as Doppler ultrasound and contrast-enhanced CT. This anomaly is frequently misdiagnosed or overlooked, and our case highlights the importance of considering venous aneurysm as a differential to prevent invasive imaging and inappropriate management...
March 15, 2018: BMJ Case Reports
Afsha Aurshina, Anil Hingorani, Ahmad Alsheekh, Pavel Kibrik, Natalie Marks, Enrico Ascher
OBJECTIVE: It has been a widely accepted practice that a previous placed pacemaker, automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillators, or central line can be a contraindication to placing a hemodialysis catheter in the ipsilateral jugular vein. Fear of dislodging pacing wires, tunneling close to the battery site or causing venous obstruction has been a concern for surgeons and interventionalists alike. We suggest that this phobia may be unfounded. METHODS: A retrospective review was conducted of patients in whom hemodialysis catheters were placed over a period of 10 years...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Vascular Access
Peter Paik, Sanjay K Arukala, Anupam A Sule
Central venous catheters are placed in approximately five million patients annually in the US. The preferred site of insertion is one with fewer risks and easier access. Although the right internal jugular vein is preferred, on occasion, the left internal jugular may have to be accessed. A patient was admitted for septic shock, cerebrovascular accident, and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. A central venous line was needed for antibiotic and vasopressor administration. Due to trauma from a fall to the right side and previously failed catheterization attempts at the left subclavian and femoral veins, the left internal jugular vein was accessed...
January 9, 2018: Curēus
Jinguo Wang, Feng Liu, Shunshun Liu, Na Wang
BACKGROUND The complication rate of central venous catheterization ranges from 4% to 35%. Brachial plexus injury can occur, mostly on the same side as the catheterization, without affecting the contralateral brachial plexus. CASE REPORT A 71-year-old woman received placement of a vein hemodialysis catheter via right internal jugular vein. Five days after the cannulation, she complained of contralateral burning pain and numbness at the ulnar side of her left forearm. On the next day, the pain increased and extended to her left shoulder girdle and whole left arm, despite use of analgesics...
March 13, 2018: American Journal of Case Reports
Anton A Kasatkin, Aleksandr L Urakov, Anna R Nigmatullina
INTRODUCTION: Central venous cannulation may be difficult in morbidly obese patients. We present a case of successful right internal jugular vein catheterization under real-time ultrasound guidance in an obese patient in a forced semi-sitting position. CASE REPORT: A 43-year-old male patient with body mass of 182 kg (body mass index, 52.2 kg/m2 ) was admitted to the clinic 48 h after the trauma. The patient was in a forced semi-sitting position (37° head elevation)...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Vascular Access
Mauro Sergio Martins Marrocos, Thais Marques S Gentil, Fernanda de C Lima, Sandra Maria R Laranja
PURPOSE: Real-time ultrasound is indicated for hemodialysis catheters' insertion in internal jugular veins. We evaluated unsuccessful implantation of short-term hemodialysis catheters in internal jugular veins using real-time ultrasound between patients with and without previous short-term catheters. METHODS: Observational open-label study of unsuccessful implantation of short-term hemodialysis catheters in internal jugular veins using real-time ultrasound from July 2013 to August 2014...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Vascular Access
J Juhász, T Lindner, C Riedel, N G Margraf, O Jansen, A Rohr
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a syndrome of raised intracranial pressure of unknown etiology. Few MR imaging-based studies have investigated arterial and venous blood flow in these patients. Results are inconclusive, and to our knowledge, no comparison of the hemodynamic parameters before and after CSF pressure reduction has been published. The aim of this study was to assess the short-term effects of normalizing CSF pressure on intracranial flow to better understand the pathophysiology of idiopathic intracranial hypertension...
March 8, 2018: AJNR. American Journal of Neuroradiology
Chao Liu, Zhi Mao, Hongjun Kang, Xin Hu, Shengmao Jiang, Pan Hu, Jie Hu, Feihu Zhou
Background: A long-axis in-plane (LA-IP) approach and a short-axis out-of-plane (SA-OOP) approach are the two main approaches used in ultrasound (US)-guided vascular catheterization. However, the efficacy and safety of these approaches remain controversial. Therefore, we performed this meta-analysis to compare the two techniques in vascular catheterization. Materials and methods: Relevant studies were searched in PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library databases from database inception until August 2017...
2018: Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
Jason Chui, Rasha Saeed, Luke Jakobowski, Wanyu Wang, Basem Eldeyasty, Angel Zhu, LeeAnne Fochesato, Ronit Lavi, Daniel Bainbridge
BACKGROUND: A routine chest X-ray (CXR) is recommended as a screening test after central venous catheter (CVC) insertion. We sought to assess the value of a routine post-procedural CXR in the era of ultrasound-guided CVC insertion. METHODS: We performed a population-based retrospective cohort study to review the records of all adult patients who had a CVC inserted in the operating room in a tertiary institution between July 1, 2008 and December 31, 2015. We determined the incidence of pneumothorax and catheter misplacement after ultrasound-guided CVC insertion...
February 28, 2018: Chest
Hany M Elrakhawy, Mohamed A Alassal, Ayman M Shaalan, Ahmed A Awad, Sameh Sayed, Mohammad M Saffan
BACKGROUND: Right ventricular (RV) dysfunction after pulmonary resection in the early postoperative period is documented by reduced RV ejection fraction and increased RV end-diastolic volume index. Supraventricular arrhythmia, particularly atrial fibrillation, is common after pulmonary resection. RV assessment can be done by non-invasive methods and/or invasive approaches such as right cardiac catheterization. Incorporation of a rapid response thermistor to pulmonary artery catheter permits continuous measurements of cardiac output, right ventricular ejection fraction, and right ventricular end-diastolic volume...
January 15, 2018: Heart Surgery Forum
Abdulrahman M Nasiri, Nora Rayes, Khaled A Bakarman
INTRODUCTION: Aneurysm is a localized dilatation of an artery of at least 1.5 times the normal diameter that occurs when part of an artery wall weakens or is injured, allowing it to widen abnormally. In practice, an arterial aneurysm is more common in comparison to a venous aneurysm. Because of the rare incidence of venous aneurysms, treatment guidelines are not clearly established and thus treatment strategies vary. This is a case of a 57-year-old Saudi woman, with no significant medical history, who presented to Prince Sultan Military Hospital complaining of swelling in the right side of the neck that started 3 years ago...
January 2018: Medicine (Baltimore)
Ilker Ince, Muhammet Ali Arı, Muhammet Mustafa Sulak, Mehmet Aksoy
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: There are different ultrasound probe positions used for internal jugular venous catheter placement. Also, in-plane or out of plane needle approach may be used for catheterization. Transverse short-axis classic approach is the most popular performed approach in literature. "Syringe-Free" is a new described technique that is performed with oblique long-axis approach. We aimed to compare performance of these two approaches. METHODS: This study was conducted as a prospective and randomized study...
February 22, 2018: Revista Brasileira de Anestesiologia
Ji Hoon Kim, Jin Ha Park, Junho Cho, Tae Young Kong, Ji Hwan Lee, Jin Ho Beom, Young Seon Joo, Dong Ryul Ko, Hyun Soo Chung
BACKGROUND: Using a two-dimensional ultrasound-guided approach does not guarantee success during the first attempt at internal jugular vein cannulation. Our randomized, parallel simulation study examined whether a new disposable device could improve the success rate of the first attempt at ultrasound-guided internal jugular vein cannulation of a simulated internal jugular vein. METHODS: Eighty-eight participants were randomized to perform needle insertion for internal jugular vein cannulation of a phantom using the ultrasound-guided approach with (case group) or without (control group) this new device...
February 12, 2018: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
Koichiro Kiya, Tateki Kubo, Shien Seike, Ko Hosokawa
Microvascular free tissue transfer is one of the most common techniques of reconstruction for complex head and neck surgical defects. Generally, venous thrombosis is more likely to occur than arterial thrombosis in vascular anastomosis. Thus, recipient veins must be chosen carefully. Although the internal jugular vein is preferred as a recipient vein by many microsurgeons, internal jugular vein thrombosis is a potential complication, as shown in our report. Therefore, we consider that the external jugular vein still is an option as a recipient for venous anastomosis and that it is better to perform multiple vein anastomoses with 2 different venous systems, such as the internal and external jugular systems, than anastomoses within the same venous system...
January 2018: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Global Open
Laura Leci-Tahiri, Harieta Zherka-Saracini, Afrim Tahiri, Adhurim Koshi
BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to analyze characteristics of patients with bilateral internal jugular vein thrombosis in our department during a 1-year period. Internal jugular vein thrombosis refers to an intraluminal thrombus occurring anywhere from the intracranial internal jugular vein to the junction of the internal jugular vein and the subclavian vein, which form the brachiocephalic vein. It can occur spontaneously or as a complication of head and neck infections, surgery, central venous lines, local malignancy, polycytemia, hyperhomocysteinemia, neck massage, or intravenous drug abuse...
February 20, 2018: Journal of Medical Case Reports
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