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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29208747/proposed-role-for-kaic-like-atpases-as-major-signal-transduction-hubs-in-archaea
#1
Kira S Makarova, Michael Y Galperin, Eugene V Koonin
All organisms must adapt to ever-changing environmental conditions and accordingly have evolved diverse signal transduction systems. In bacteria, the most abundant networks are built around the two-component signal transduction systems that include histidine kinases and receiver domains. In contrast, eukaryotic signal transduction is dominated by serine/threonine/tyrosine protein kinases. Both of these systems are also found in archaea, but they are not as common and diversified as their bacterial and eukaryotic counterparts, suggesting the possibility that archaea have evolved other, still uncharacterized signal transduction networks...
December 5, 2017: MBio
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29202832/inevitability-of-the-emergence-and-persistence-of-genetic-parasites-caused-by-evolutionary-instability-of-parasite-free-states
#2
Eugene V Koonin, Yuri I Wolf, Mikhail I Katsnelson
Genetic parasites, including viruses and mobile genetic elements, are ubiquitous among cellular life forms, and moreover, are the most abundant biological entities on earth that harbor the bulk of the genetic diversity. Here we examine simple thought experiments to demonstrate that both the emergence of parasites in simple replicator systems and their persistence in evolving life forms are inevitable because the putative parasite-free states are evolutionarily unstable. REVIEWERS: This article has been reviewed by Yitzhak Pilpel, Bojan Zagrovic, and Eric van Nimwegen...
December 4, 2017: Biology Direct
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29191215/domestication-of-self-splicing-introns-during-eukaryogenesis-the-rise-of-the-complex-spliceosomal-machinery
#3
REVIEW
Julian Vosseberg, Berend Snel
ᅟ: The spliceosome is a eukaryote-specific complex that is essential for the removal of introns from pre-mRNA. It consists of five small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) and over a hundred proteins, making it one of the most complex molecular machineries. Most of this complexity has emerged during eukaryogenesis, a period that is characterised by a drastic increase in cellular and genomic complexity. Although not fully resolved, recent findings have started to shed some light on how and why the spliceosome originated...
December 1, 2017: Biology Direct
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29179671/phylogenomics-of-cas4-family-nucleases
#4
Sanjarbek Hudaiberdiev, Sergey Shmakov, Yuri I Wolf, Michael P Terns, Kira S Makarova, Eugene V Koonin
BACKGROUND: The Cas4 family endonuclease is a component of the adaptation module in many variants of CRISPR-Cas adaptive immunity systems. Unlike most of the other Cas proteins, Cas4 is often encoded outside CRISPR-cas loci (solo-Cas4) and is also found in mobile genetic elements (MGE-Cas4). RESULTS: As part of our ongoing investigation of CRISPR-Cas evolution, we explored the phylogenomics of the Cas4 family. About 90% of the archaeal genomes encode Cas4 compared to only about 20% of the bacterial genomes...
November 28, 2017: BMC Evolutionary Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29175107/viruses-of-archaea-structural-functional-environmental-and-evolutionary-genomics
#5
REVIEW
Mart Krupovic, Virginija Cvirkaite-Krupovic, Jaime Iranzo, David Prangishvili, Eugene V Koonin
Viruses of archaea represent one of the most enigmatic parts of the virosphere. Most of the characterized archaeal viruses infect extremophilic hosts and display remarkable diversity of virion morphotypes, many of which have never been observed among viruses of bacteria or eukaryotes. The uniqueness of the virion morphologies is matched by the distinctiveness of the genomes of these viruses, with ∼75% of genes encoding unique proteins, refractory to functional annotation based on sequence analyses. In this review, we summarize the state-of-the-art knowledge on various aspects of archaeal virus genomics...
November 22, 2017: Virus Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29133882/discovery-of-an-expansive-bacteriophage-family-that-includes-the-most-abundant-viruses-from-the-human-gut
#6
Natalya Yutin, Kira S Makarova, Ayal B Gussow, Mart Krupovic, Anca Segall, Robert A Edwards, Eugene V Koonin
Metagenomic sequence analysis is rapidly becoming the primary source of virus discovery (1-3) . A substantial majority of the currently available virus genomes come from metagenomics, and some of these represent extremely abundant viruses, even if never grown in the laboratory. A particularly striking case of a virus discovered via metagenomics is crAssphage, which is by far the most abundant human-associated virus known, comprising up to 90% of sequences in the gut virome (4) . Over 80% of the predicted proteins encoded in the approximately 100 kilobase crAssphage genome showed no significant similarity to available protein sequences, precluding classification of this virus and hampering further study...
November 13, 2017: Nature Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29132422/cellular-origin-of-the-viral-capsid-like-bacterial-microcompartments
#7
Mart Krupovic, Eugene V Koonin
ᅟ: Bacterial microcompartments (BMC) are proteinaceous organelles that structurally resemble viral capsids, but encapsulate enzymes that perform various specialized biochemical reactions in the cell cytoplasm. The BMC are constructed from two major shell proteins, BMC-H and BMC-P, which form the facets and vertices of the icosahedral assembly, and are functionally equivalent to the major and minor capsid proteins of viruses, respectively. This equivalence notwithstanding, neither of the BMC proteins displays structural similarity to known capsid proteins, rendering the origins of the BMC enigmatic...
November 13, 2017: Biology Direct
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29123227/the-enigmatic-archaeal-virosphere
#8
REVIEW
David Prangishvili, Dennis H Bamford, Patrick Forterre, Jaime Iranzo, Eugene V Koonin, Mart Krupovic
One of the most prominent features of archaea is the extraordinary diversity of their DNA viruses. Many archaeal viruses differ substantially in morphology from bacterial and eukaryotic viruses and represent unique virus families. The distinct nature of archaeal viruses also extends to the gene composition and architectures of their genomes and the properties of the proteins that they encode. Environmental research has revealed prominent roles of archaeal viruses in influencing microbial communities in ocean ecosystems, and recent metagenomic studies have uncovered new groups of archaeal viruses that infect extremophiles and mesophiles in diverse habitats...
November 10, 2017: Nature Reviews. Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29103997/metagenomics-reshapes-the-concepts-of-rna-virus-evolution-by-revealing-extensive-horizontal-virus-transfer
#9
REVIEW
Valerian V Dolja, Eugene V Koonin
Virus metagenomics is a young research filed but it has already transformed our understanding of virus diversity and evolution, and illuminated at a new level the connections between virus evolution and the evolution and ecology of the hosts. In this review article, we examine the new picture of the evolution of RNA viruses, the dominant component of the eukaryotic virome, that is emerging from metagenomic data analysis. The major expansion of many groups of RNA viruses through metagenomics allowed the construction of substantially improved phylogenetic trees for the conserved virus genes, primarily, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp)...
November 8, 2017: Virus Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29037253/asxl-gain-of-function-truncation-mutants-defective-and-dysregulated-forms-of-a-natural-ribosomal-frameshifting-product
#10
Adam M Dinan, John F Atkins, Andrew E Firth
BACKGROUND: Programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF) is a gene expression mechanism which enables the translation of two N-terminally coincident, C-terminally distinct protein products from a single mRNA. Many viruses utilize PRF to control or regulate gene expression, but very few phylogenetically conserved examples are known in vertebrate genes. Additional sex combs-like (ASXL) genes 1 and 2 encode important epigenetic and transcriptional regulatory proteins that control the expression of homeotic genes during key developmental stages...
October 16, 2017: Biology Direct
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28985292/extreme-deviations-from-expected-evolutionary-rates-in-archaeal-protein-families
#11
Celine Petitjean, Kira S Makarova, Yuri I Wolf, Eugene V Koonin
Origin of new biological functions is a complex phenomenon ranging from single-nucleotide substitutions to the gain of new genes via horizontal gene transfer or duplication. Neofunctionalization and subfunctionalization of proteins is often attributed to the emergence of paralogs that are subject to relaxed purifying selection or positive selection and thus evolve at accelerated rates. Such phenomena potentially could be detected as anomalies in the phylogenies of the respective gene families. We developed a computational pipeline to search for such anomalies in 1,834 orthologous clusters of archaeal genes, focusing on lineage-specific subfamilies that significantly deviate from the expected rate of evolution...
October 1, 2017: Genome Biology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28985291/mobile-genetic-elements-and-evolution-of-crispr-cas-systems-all-the-way-there-and-back
#12
Eugene V Koonin, Kira S Makarova
The Clustered Regularly Interspaced Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated proteins (Cas) systems of bacterial and archaeal adaptive immunity show multifaceted evolutionary relationships with at least five classes of mobile genetic elements (MGE). First, the adaptation module of CRISPR-Cas that is responsible for the formation of the immune memory apparently evolved from a Casposon, a self-synthesizing transposon that employs the Cas1 protein as the integrase and might have brought additional cas genes to the emerging immunity loci...
October 1, 2017: Genome Biology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28969666/why-we-don-t-want-another-synthesis
#13
Arlin Stoltzfus
High-level debates in evolutionary biology often treat the Modern Synthesis as a framework of population genetics, or as an intellectual lineage with a changing distribution of beliefs. Unfortunately, these flexible notions, used to negotiate decades of innovations, are now thoroughly detached from their historical roots in the original Modern Synthesis (OMS), a falsifiable scientific theory. The OMS held that evolution can be adequately understood as a process of smooth adaptive change by shifting the frequencies of small-effect alleles at many loci simultaneously, without the direct involvement of new mutations...
October 2, 2017: Biology Direct
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28968633/microbial-genome-analysis-the-cog-approach
#14
Michael Y Galperin, David M Kristensen, Kira S Makarova, Yuri I Wolf, Eugene V Koonin
For the past 20 years, the Clusters of Orthologous Genes (COG) database had been a popular tool for microbial genome annotation and comparative genomics. Initially created for the purpose of evolutionary classification of protein families, the COG have been used, apart from straightforward functional annotation of sequenced genomes, for such tasks as (i) unification of genome annotation in groups of related organisms; (ii) identification of missing and/or undetected genes in complete microbial genomes; (iii) analysis of genomic neighborhoods, in many cases allowing prediction of novel functional systems; (iv) analysis of metabolic pathways and prediction of alternative forms of enzymes; (v) comparison of organisms by COG functional categories; and (vi) prioritization of targets for structural and functional characterization...
September 14, 2017: Briefings in Bioinformatics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28963504/selection-on-start-codons-in-prokaryotes-and-potential-compensatory-nucleotide-substitutions
#15
Frida Belinky, Igor B Rogozin, Eugene V Koonin
Reconstruction of the evolution of start codons in 36 groups of closely related bacterial and archaeal genomes reveals purifying selection affecting AUG codons. The AUG starts are replaced by GUG and especially UUG significantly less frequently than expected under the neutral expectation derived from the frequencies of the respective nucleotide triplet substitutions in non-coding regions and in 4-fold degenerate sites. Thus, AUG is the optimal start codon that is actively maintained by purifying selection. However, purifying selection on start codons is significantly weaker than the selection on the same codons in coding sequences, although the switches between the codons result in conservative amino acid substitutions...
September 29, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28937734/discovery-of-oligonucleotide-signaling-mediated-by-crispr-associated-polymerases-solves-two-puzzles-but-leaves-an-enigma
#16
Eugene V Koonin, Kira S Makarova
The signature component of type III CRISPR-Cas systems is the Cas10 protein that consists of two Palm domains homologous to those of DNA and RNA polymerases, and nucleotide cyclases, and an HD nuclease domain. However, until very recently, the activity of the Palm domains and their role in CRISPR function have not been experimentally established. Most of the type III CRISPR-Cas systems and some type I systems also encompass proteins containing the CARF (CRISPR-associated Rossmann fold) domain that has been predicted to regulate CRISPR functions via nucleotide binding but its function in CRISPR-Cas remained obscure...
September 22, 2017: ACS Chemical Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28928211/the-crispr-spacer-space-is-dominated-by-sequences-from-species-specific-mobilomes
#17
Sergey A Shmakov, Vassilii Sitnik, Kira S Makarova, Yuri I Wolf, Konstantin V Severinov, Eugene V Koonin
Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats and CRISPR-associated protein (CRISPR-Cas) systems store the memory of past encounters with foreign DNA in unique spacers that are inserted between direct repeats in CRISPR arrays. For only a small fraction of the spacers, homologous sequences, called protospacers, are detectable in viral, plasmid, and microbial genomes. The rest of the spacers remain the CRISPR "dark matter." We performed a comprehensive analysis of the spacers from all CRISPR-cas loci identified in bacterial and archaeal genomes, and we found that, depending on the CRISPR-Cas subtype and the prokaryotic phylum, protospacers were detectable for 1% to about 19% of the spacers (~7% global average)...
September 19, 2017: MBio
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28853922/origin-and-evolution-of-the-universal-genetic-code
#18
Eugene V Koonin, Artem S Novozhilov
The standard genetic code (SGC) is virtually universal among extant life forms. Although many deviations from the universal code exist, particularly in organelles and prokaryotes with small genomes, they are limited in scope and obviously secondary. The universality of the code likely results from the combination of a frozen accident, i.e., the deleterious effect of codon reassignment in the SGC, and the inhibitory effect of changes in the code on horizontal gene transfer. The structure of the SGC is nonrandom and ensures high robustness of the code to mutational and translational errors...
November 27, 2017: Annual Review of Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28851439/on-the-global-crispr-array-behavior-in-class-i-systems
#19
Alice Toms, Rodolphe Barrangou
BACKGROUND: Much effort is underway to build and upgrade databases and tools related to occurrence, diversity, and characterization of CRISPR-Cas systems. As microbial communities and their genome complements are unearthed, much emphasis has been placed on details of individual strains and model systems within the CRISPR-Cas classification, and that collection of information as a whole affords the opportunity to analyze CRISPR-Cas systems from a quantitative perspective to gain insight into distribution of CRISPR array sizes across the different classes, types and subtypes...
August 29, 2017: Biology Direct
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28811374/recruitment-of-crispr-cas-systems-by-tn7-like-transposons
#20
Joseph E Peters, Kira S Makarova, Sergey Shmakov, Eugene V Koonin
A survey of bacterial and archaeal genomes shows that many Tn7-like transposons contain minimal type I-F CRISPR-Cas systems that consist of fused cas8f and cas5f, cas7f, and cas6f genes and a short CRISPR array. Several small groups of Tn7-like transposons encompass similarly truncated type I-B CRISPR-Cas. This minimal gene complement of the transposon-associated CRISPR-Cas systems implies that they are competent for pre-CRISPR RNA (precrRNA) processing yielding mature crRNAs and target binding but not target cleavage that is required for interference...
August 29, 2017: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
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