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Work engagement

Suzanne Grant, Bruce Guthrie
Patient safety is an increasing concern for health systems internationally. The majority of administrative work in UK general practice takes place in the context of organisational routines such as repeat prescribing and test results handling, where high workloads and increased clinician dependency on administrative staff have been identified as an emerging safety issue. Despite this trend, most research to date has focused on the redistribution of the clinical workload between doctors, nurses and allied health professionals within individual care settings...
March 2, 2018: Social Science & Medicine
Melanie Birks, John Smithson, Janene Antney, Lin Zhao, Camilla Burkot
BACKGROUND: Universities' responsibility to ensure academic integrity is frustrated by software and communication tools that facilitate content reuse coupled with a growing international essay writing economy. A wide range of behaviours constitute academic dishonesty and while a complex phenomenon to examine, existing evidence suggests that there is sufficient proliferation (both in volume and variety) of these behaviours among Australian university students to warrant concern. This proliferation presents faculty and staff with new challenges in ensuring academic integrity...
March 2, 2018: Nurse Education Today
Ganbold Lundeg, Amanda Baric, David C Pescod, Keith Pescod
Anesthesia in Mongolia has undergone a period of major development over the past 17 years, thanks to the work of the Mongolian Society of Anesthesiologists (MSA) and the support of the World Federation of Societies of Anaesthesiologists and the Australian Society of Anaesthetists. The specialty has made major advances in training and in its standing among medical specialties in Mongolia. The MSA has produced members who are leaders in the development of anesthesia as well as emergency medicine and critical care...
April 2018: Anesthesia and Analgesia
Somogy Varga
Often drawing on the phenomenological tradition, a number of philosophers and cognitive scientists working in the field of "embodied cognition" subscribe to the general view that cognition is grounded in aspects of its sensorimotor embodiment and should be comprehended as the result of a dynamic interaction of nonneural and neural processes. After a brief introduction, the paper critically engages Lakoff and Johnson's "conceptual metaphor theory" (CMT), and provides a review of recent empirical evidence that appears to support it...
March 13, 2018: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy
Fiona M Nea, L Kirsty Pourshahidi, John M Kearney, M Barbara E Livingstone, Carolina Bassul, Clare A Corish
Background: Approximately 17% of the European workforce is engaged in shift work. How the experience of shift work impacts on the dietary and lifestyle practices of workers is unclear. Methods: Overall, 15 focus groups were conducted by two researchers, with 109 participants. The initial focus group was carried out with both researchers present, to ensure consistency in facilitation. Both researchers thematically analysed all data collected. Results: Shift work was described as affecting many areas of workers' lives...
March 13, 2018: Journal of Public Health
Lorenza Tulli, Francesca Cattaneo, Juliette Vinot, Cosima T Baldari, Ugo D'Oro
Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a key role in the activation of innate immune cells, in which their engagement leads to production of cytokines and co-stimulatory molecules. TLRs signaling requires recruitment of toll/IL-1R (TIR) domain-containing adaptors, such as MyD88 and/or TRIF, and leads to activation of several transcription factors, such as NF-κB, the AP1 complex, and various members of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family, which in turn results in triggering of several cellular functions associated with these receptors...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
Nikki Kiyimba, Michelle O'Reilly, Jessica Nina Lester
The National Health Service (UK) offers initial screening appointments for children referred to child and adolescent mental health services to determine clinical need and assess risk. Conversation analysis was utilized on 28 video recordings of these assessments, lasting approximately 90 minutes each with a multidisciplinary team. This article focuses on the agenda setting strategies used to establish relevant goals with children and adolescents; specifically, the technique of offering 'three wishes'. For example, ' if you had three wishes, what would you like to make happen?' In cases where children initially volunteered an assessment-relevant wish, they tended not to articulate further wishes...
January 1, 2018: Journal of Child Health Care: for Professionals Working with Children in the Hospital and Community
Tarisai Chiyaka, Phillis Mushati, Bernadette Hensen, Sungai Chabata, James R Hargreaves, Sian Floyd, Isolde J Birdthistle, Frances M Cowan, Joanna R Busza
Young women (aged 15-24) who exchange sex for money or other support are among the highest risk groups for HIV acquisition, particularly in high prevalence settings. To prepare for introduction and evaluation of the DREAMS programme in Zimbabwe, which provides biomedical and social interventions to reduce adolescent girls' and young women's HIV vulnerability, we conducted a rapid needs assessment in 6 towns using a "social mapping" approach. In each site, we talked to adult sex workers and other key informants to identify locations where young women sell sex, followed by direct observation, group discussions and interviews...
2018: PloS One
Paulina Duckic, Robert B Hayes
Buildup factors are dimensionless multiplicative factors required by the point kernel method to account for scattered radiation through a shielding material. The accuracy of the point kernel method is strongly affected by the correspondence of analyzed parameters to experimental configurations, which is attempted to be simplified here. The point kernel method has not been found to have widespread practical use for neutron shielding calculations due to the complex neutron transport behavior through shielding materials (i...
March 14, 2018: Health Physics
Dávid Szamosvári, Sina Rütschlin, Thomas Böttcher
Bacteria engage in numerous collaborative and competitive interactions, which are often mediated by small molecule metabolites. Bacterial competition involves for example the production of compounds that effectively kill or inhibit growth of their neighbours but also the secretion of siderophores that allow securing the essential and fiercely embattled resource of ferric iron. Yet, the enormous diversity of metabolites produced has remained puzzling in many cases. We here present examples of both types of competition from our recent work...
March 15, 2018: Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry
Ann L Coker
This response to Katz's commentary is based on our team's experiences and findings in bystander intervention design and evaluation among male and female adolescents in several high school settings. Three themes emerged in reflecting on "what worked" in our large evaluation in light of Katz's commentary. First, our field needs data from multiple rigorous bystander intervention evaluations. Second, bystander interventions must be acceptable to the population receiving the intervention. Third, engaging all adolescent and young adults in prevention independent of sex or sexual orientation is essential to reduce sexual violence including harassment and bullying...
March 1, 2018: Violence Against Women
Pooja Tripathi, Ramachandra Kamath, Rajnarayan Tiwari
Background: Fisherwomen are informal sector workers involved in post-harvest operations and are mostly engaged in peeling, trading, and processing of fish. High degree of wage disparity and gender inequalities results in different socioeconomic status of fisherwomen and fishermen. This study aimed to identify gender issues and their effect on the health status of fisherwomen. Materials and Methods: The present cross-sectional included 171 fishermen and fisherwomen...
May 2017: Indian Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Arun Gupta, Pratima Murthy, Shobini Rao
Chronic use of mind altering substances can lead to a wide variety of neuropsychological deficits, affecting the domains of attention, learning, memory, reasoning. Executive functions such as working memory, cognitive flexibility and inhibitory control may specifically be impaired. These deficits can impact engagement in effective psychosocial interventions. Mild to moderate cognitive dysfunction may not be picked up in routine clinical examination or through commonly used tests like the mini-mental state examination (MMSE)...
February 2018: Indian Journal of Psychiatry
J Stansfield, J South
This article examines the development and impact of a national knowledge translation project aimed at improving access to evidence and learning on community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing. Structural changes in the English health system meant that knowledge on community engagement was becoming lost and a fragmented evidence base was seen to impact negatively on policy and practice. A partnership started between Public Health England, NHS England and Leeds Beckett University in 2014 to address these issues...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Public Health
Sarah Jane Holcombe
Unsafe abortion is one of the three leading causes of maternal mortality in low-income countries; however, few countries have reformed their laws to permit safer, legal abortion, and professional medical associations have not tended to spearhead this type of reform. Support from a professional association typically carries more weight than does that from an individual medical professional. However, theory predicts and the empirical record largely reveals that medical associations shy from engagement in conflictual policymaking such as on abortion, except when professional autonomy or income is at stake...
March 12, 2018: Health Policy and Planning
Akhilesh S Pathipati, Christine K Cassel
Although they enter school with enthusiasm for a career in medicine, medical students in the United States subsequently report high levels of burnout and disillusionment. As medical school leaders consider how to address this problem, they can look to business schools as one source of inspiration. In this Commentary, the authors argue-based on their collective experience in both medical and business education-that medical schools can draw three lessons from business schools that can help reinvigorate students...
March 13, 2018: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
Katrina E Donahue, Alfred Reid, Elizabeth G Baxley, Charles Carter, Peter J Carek, Mark Robinson, Warren P Newton
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The I3 POP Collaborative sought to improve health of patients attending North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia primary care teaching practices using the triple aim framework of better quality, appropriate utilization, and enhanced patient experience. We examined change in triple aim measures over 3 years, and identified correlates of improvement. METHODS: Twenty-nine teaching practices representing 23 residency programs participated...
March 2018: Family Medicine
Stephen T Casper
OBJECTIVE: To review the intellectual history of concussion from the mid-19th century to the opening decade of the 21st century. BACKGROUND: Head injuries (HI) and their acute and long-term effects have been investigated for centuries, with major reviews of the topic appearing by 1870. Thus, while it has long been acknowledged that chronic traumatic encephalopathy was first described by Harrison Martland in 1928, an examination of the history of concussion research up to Martland's seminal report places his studies in a deeper historical context...
March 14, 2018: Headache
Jeanne M Ferrante, Eric K Shaw, Jennifer E Bayly, Jenna Howard, M Nell Quest, Elizabeth C Clark, Connie Pascal
BACKGROUND: Many primary care practices participating in patient-centered medical home (PCMH) transformation initiatives are expanding the work roles of their medical assistants (MAs). Little is known about attitudes of MAs or barriers and facilitators to these role changes. METHODS: Secondary data analysis of qualitative cross-case comparison study of 15 New Jersey primary care practices participating in a PCMH project during 2012 to 2013. Observation field notes and in-depth and key informant interviews (with physicians, office managers, staff and care coordinators) were iteratively analyzed using grounded theory...
March 2018: Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine: JABFM
Deirdre M Twomey, Conal Wrigley, Caroline Ahearne, Raegan Murphy, Michelle De Haan, Neil Marlow, Deirdre M Murray
OBJECTIVE: To explore the feasibility of using a touch screen assessment tool to measure cognitive capacity in toddlers. DESIGN: 112 typically developing children with a median age of 31 months (IQR: 26-34) interacted with a touch screen cognitive assessment tool. We examined the sensitivity of the tool to age-related changes in cognition by comparing the number of items completed, speed of task completion and accuracy in two age groups; 24-29 months versus 30-36 months...
March 13, 2018: Archives of Disease in Childhood
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