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Non invasive ventilation neonates

Keren Mandelzweig, Aleksandra Leligdowicz, Srinivas Murthy, Rejani Lalitha, Robert A Fowler, Neill K J Adhikari
PURPOSE: We systematically reviewed the effects of NIV for acute respiratory failure (ARF) in low- and low-middle income countries. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, CENTRAL, and EMBASE (to January 2016) for observational studies and trials of NIV for ARF or in the peri-extubation period in adults and post-neonatal children. We abstracted outcomes data and assessed quality. Meta-analyses used random-effect models. RESULTS: Fifty-four studies (ten pediatric/n=1099; 44 adult/n=2904), mostly South Asian, were included...
January 12, 2018: Journal of Critical Care
Rohini Venkataraman, Majeeda Kamaluddeen, Harish Amin, Abhay Lodha
In utero sensory stimuli and interaction with the environment strongly influence early phases of fetal and infant development. Extremely premature infants are subjected to noxious procedures and routine monitoring, in addition to exposure to excessive light and noise, which disturb the natural sleep cycle and induce stress. Non-invasive ventilation, measures to prevent sepsis, and human milk feeding improve short-term and long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes in premature infants. To preserve brain function, and to improve quality of life and long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes, the focus now is on the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) environment and its impact on the infant during hospital stay...
January 15, 2018: Indian Pediatrics
Christian F Poets, Laila Lorenz
Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is one of the most frequent complications in extremely low gestational age neonates, but has remained largely unchanged in rate. We reviewed data on BPD prevention focusing on recent meta-analyses. Interventions with proven effectiveness in reducing BPD include the primary use of non-invasive respiratory support, the application of surfactant without endotracheal ventilation and the use of volume-targeted ventilation in infants requiring endotracheal intubation. Following extubation, synchronised nasal ventilation is more effective than continuous positive airway pressure in reducing BPD...
January 23, 2018: Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal Edition
Carmen Rey-Santano, Victoria E Mielgo, Miguel Angel Gomez-Solaetxe, Francesca Ricci, Federico Bianco, Fabrizio Salomone, Begoña Loureiro, Jon López de Heredia Y Goya
BACKGROUND: Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) and nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV), forms of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) for respiratory support, are increasingly being chosen as the initial treatment for neonates with surfactant (SF) deficiency. Our objective was to compare NCPAP with NIPPV with or without SF administration as a primary mode of ventilation. METHODS: Twenty-four newborn piglets with SF-deficient lung injury produced by repetitive bronchoalveolar lavages were randomly assigned to NCPAP or NIPPV, with or without SF administration (InSurE method)...
January 10, 2018: Pediatric Research
Antonio Di Mauro, Manuela Capozza, Sergio Cotugno, Silvio Tafuri, Francesco Paolo Bianchi, Federico Schettini, Raffaella Panza, Nicola Laforgia
BACKGROUND: Pulmonary disorders and respiratory failure represent one of the most common morbidities of preterm newborns admitted to neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). The use of nasal high-flow therapy (nHFT) has been more recently introduced into the NICUs as a non-invasive respiratory (NIV) support. METHODS: We performed a retrospective study to evaluate safety and effectiveness of nHFT as primary support for infants born < 29 weeks of gestation and/or VLBW presenting with mild Respiratory Distress Syndrome (RDS)...
December 28, 2017: Italian Journal of Pediatrics
Daniel Klotz, Hendryk Schneider, Stefan Schumann, Benjamin Mayer, Hans Fuchs
OBJECTIVE: Non-invasive high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (nHFOV) has recently been described as a novel mode of respiratory support for premature infants. This study was designed to determine whether nHFOV decreases CO2 partial pressure (pCO2 ) in premature infants more effectively than non-invasive continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP). DESIGN: Non-blinded prospective randomised controlled cross-over study. SETTING: University Medical Center tertiary neonatal intensive care unit...
September 16, 2017: Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal Edition
Calum T Roberts, Kate A Hodgson
Nasal High Flow (HF) is a mode of 'non-invasive' respiratory support for preterm infants, with several potential modes of action, including generation of distending airway pressure, washout of the nasopharyngeal dead space, reduction of work of breathing, and heating and humidification of inspired gas. HF has several potential advantages over continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), the most commonly applied form of non-invasive support, such as reduced nasal trauma, ease of use, and infant comfort, which has led to its rapid adoption into neonatal care...
2017: Maternal Health, Neonatology and Perinatology
Tim L Ullrich, Christoph Czernik, Christoph Bührer, Gerd Schmalisch, Hendrik S Fischer
OBJECTIVE: Nasal high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (nHFOV) is a novel mode of non-invasive ventilation used in neonates. However, upper airway obstructions due to viscous secretions have been described as specific adverse effects. We hypothesized that high-frequency oscillations reduce air humidity in the oropharynx, resulting in upper airway desiccation. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the effects of nHFOV ventilatory settings on oropharyngeal gas conditions. METHODS: NHFOV or nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) was applied, along with heated humidification, to a previously established neonatal bench model that simulates oropharyngeal gas conditions during spontaneous breathing through an open mouth...
November 2017: Pediatric Pulmonology
Arezu Charsizadeh, Hossein Mirhendi, Bahram Nikmanesh, Hamid Eshaghi, Koichi Makimura
Invasive candidiasis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children. However, limited data are available on the epidemiology of this infection in paediatric settings in Iran. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, microbial epidemiology, risk factors and clinical outcomes associated with candidaemia in intensive care units at the Children's Medical Center, Tehran, Iran. All blood and other normally sterile specimen cultures positive for Candida species were included. Isolates were identified by morphological and molecular methods...
January 2018: Mycoses
Wilfredo De Jesus Rojas, Cheryl L Samuels, Traci R Gonzales, Katrina E McBeth, Aravind Yadav, James M Stark, Cindy Jon, Ricardo A Mosquera
BACKGROUND: Nasal non-invasive-ventilation (Nasal NIV) is a mode of ventilatory support providing positive pressure to patients via a nasal interface. The RAM Cannula is an oxygen delivery device that can be used as an alternative approach to deliver positive pressure. Together they have been successfully used to provide respiratory support in neonatal in-patient settings. OBJECTIVE: To describe the outpatient use of Nasal NIV/RAM Cannula as a feasible alternative for home respiratory support in children with chronic respiratory failure...
2017: Open Respiratory Medicine Journal
Vasantha H S Kumar
Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a form of chronic lung disease in premature infants following respiratory distress at birth. With increasing survival of extremely low birth weight infants, alveolar simplification is the defining lung characteristic of infants with BPD, and along with pulmonary hypertension, increasingly contributes to both respiratory morbidity and mortality in these infants. Growth restricted infants, infants born to mothers with oligohydramnios or following prolonged preterm rupture of membranes are at particular risk for early onset pulmonary hypertension...
August 24, 2017: Children
Christophe Milési, Julien Baleine, Thibault Mura, Fernando Benito-Castro, Félicie Ferragu, Gérard Thiriez, Pierre Thévenot, Clémentine Combes, Ricardo Carbajal, Gilles Cambonie
OBJECTIVE: To compare the effectiveness of sedation by intranasal administration of midazolam (nMDZ) or ketamine (nKTM) for neonatal intubation. DESIGN: A multicentre, prospective, randomised, double-blind study. SETTING: Delivery rooms at four tertiary perinatal centres in France. PATIENTS: Preterm neonates with respiratory distress requiring non-emergent endotracheal intubation for surfactant instillation. INTERVENTIONS: Treatment was randomly allocated, with each neonate receiving a bolus of 0...
August 17, 2017: Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal Edition
Christopher McPherson, Terrie Inder
Optimal obstetric and neonatal care requires the provision of adequate analgesia for painful procedures. However, anesthetic and analgesic agents have the potential to adversely impact the developing fetal/neonatal brain. In this setting, clinicians must assess the risks and benefits of pharmacologic anesthesia and analgesia for specific indications in this population. General anesthesia is required for non-obstetric surgery and cesarean section in the absence of neuraxial anesthesia for the health of the mother and fetus...
October 2017: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
Vincenzo Salvo, Gianluca Lista, Enrica Lupo, Alberto Ricotti, Luc J I Zimmermann, Antonio W D Gavilanes, Eloisa Gitto, Micaela Colivicchi, Valeria Ferraù, Diego Gazzolo
BACKGROUND: Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) significantly changed the management of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in preterm infants. Further perspectives for neonatologists regard the assessment of different NIV strategies in terms of availability, effectiveness, and failure. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effectiveness of three different NIV strategies: nasal continuous positive airway pressure (N-CPAP), nasal synchronized intermittent positive pressure ventilation (N-SIPPV), and nasal bilevel-CPAP (BiPAP), as first intention treatment for RDS in very low birth-weight infants (VLBW)...
August 1, 2017: Journal of Maternal-fetal & Neonatal Medicine
Brett J Manley, Calum T Roberts, Gaston R B Arnolda, Ian M R Wright, Louise S Owen, Kim M Dalziel, Jann P Foster, Peter G Davis, Adam G Buckmaster
INTRODUCTION: Nasal high-flow (nHF) therapy is a popular mode of respiratory support for newborn infants. Evidence for nHF use is predominantly from neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). There are no randomised trials of nHF use in non-tertiary special care nurseries (SCNs). We hypothesise that nHF is non-inferior to nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) as primary support for newborn infants with respiratory distress, in the population cared for in non-tertiary SCNs. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The HUNTER trial is an unblinded Australian multicentre, randomised, non-inferiority trial...
June 23, 2017: BMJ Open
E E Foglia, E A Jensen, H Kirpalani
Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is the most common chronic respiratory complication of preterm birth. Preterm infants are at risk for acute lung injury immediately after birth, which predisposes to BPD. In this article, we review the current evidence for interventions applied during neonatal transition (delivery room and first postnatal hours of life) to prevent BPD in extremely preterm infants: continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), sustained lung inflation, supplemental oxygen use during neonatal resuscitation, and surfactant therapy including less-invasive surfactant administration...
November 2017: Journal of Perinatology: Official Journal of the California Perinatal Association
Rodrigo Dias Nunes, Flávia Duarte Schutz, Jefferson Luiz Traebert
PURPOSE: Cerebral palsy is often associated with prematurity and magnesium sulfate (MgSO 4 ) has been used as a neuroprotector, with favorable results. However, its mechanism of action has not been fully elucidated. This study aimed to evaluate the association between MgSO 4 at the imminent premature delivery and neonatal hemodynamic effects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study involving 94 newborns (NB) between 24 and 32 weeks at a Brazilian hospital was performed...
June 2, 2017: Journal of Maternal-fetal & Neonatal Medicine
Manoj Biniwale, Fiona Wertheimer
BACKGROUND: The literature supports minimizing duration of invasive ventilation to decrease lung injury in premature infants. Neonatal Resuscitation Program recommended use of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in delivery room for infants requiring prolonged respiratory support. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of implementation of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) using nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) for resuscitation in very low birth infants...
July 2017: Resuscitation
Sindhu Sivanandan, Ramesh Agarwal, Amanpreet Sethi
Most neonatal deaths worldwide occur in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Respiratory distress is an important cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. The epidemiology of respiratory distress among term neonates who constitute the vast majority of births is under reported. The scarcely available data from LMICs suggest an incidence of 1.2% to 7.2% among term live births and greater morbidity compared to that in high-income countries. Pneumonia and meconium aspiration syndrome are the predominant causes among outborn neonates, but next only to transient tachypnea among inborn neonates...
August 2017: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
Nermin Ramy, Mohamed Hashim, Heba Abou Hussein, Happy Sawires, Maha Gaafar, Ayat El Maghraby
Background: The aim of the study was to assess the effect of early-onset neutropenia (EON) on the development of candidemia in premature infants and evaluate other risk factors. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was carried out in a neonatal intensive care unit of Cairo University Hospital. Fifty neutropenic premature infants were matched to 50 non-neutropenics. Subjects were then regrouped into candidemics and non-candidemics to study other risk factors such as central venous catheters, mechanical ventilation, parenteral nutrition, drugs as corticosteroids and others...
April 24, 2017: Journal of Tropical Pediatrics
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