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High flow nasal oxygen

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28870355/mechanical-ventilation-state-of-the-art
#1
REVIEW
Tài Pham, Laurent J Brochard, Arthur S Slutsky
Mechanical ventilation is the most used short-term life support technique worldwide and is applied daily for a diverse spectrum of indications, from scheduled surgical procedures to acute organ failure. This state-of-the-art review provides an update on the basic physiology of respiratory mechanics, the working principles, and the main ventilatory settings, as well as the potential complications of mechanical ventilation. Specific ventilatory approaches in particular situations such as acute respiratory distress syndrome and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are detailed along with protective ventilation in patients with normal lungs...
September 2017: Mayo Clinic Proceedings
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28870157/ten-important-articles-on-noninvasive-ventilation-in-critically-ill-patients-and-insights-for-the-future-a-report-of-expert-opinions
#2
A Cortegiani, V Russotto, M Antonelli, E Azoulay, A Carlucci, G Conti, A Demoule, M Ferrer, N S Hill, S Jaber, P Navalesi, P Pelosi, R Scala, C Gregoretti
BACKGROUND: Noninvasive ventilation is used worldwide in many settings. Its effectiveness has been proven for common clinical conditions in critical care such as cardiogenic pulmonary edema and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations. Since the first pioneering studies of noninvasive ventilation in critical care in the late 1980s, thousands of studies and articles have been published on this topic. Interestingly, some aspects remain controversial (e.g. its use in de-novo hypoxemic respiratory failure, role of sedation, self-induced lung injury)...
September 4, 2017: BMC Anesthesiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28858552/nitrous-oxide-inhalation-sedation-through-a-nasal-high-flow-system-the-possibility-of-a-new-technique-in-dental-sedation
#3
Takuro Sanuki, Gaku Mishima, Kensuke Kiriishi, Shinji Kurata, Ichiro Okaysu, Mari Kawai, Toshihiro Watanabe, Mizuki Tachi, Nobuyasu Komasawa, Takao Ayuse
High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) systems are increasingly used for patients with both acute and chronic respiratory failure because of the clinical effectiveness and patient comfort associated with their use. Recently, HFNC has been used not only as a respiratory support device, but also as a drug delivery system. HFNC is designed to administer heated and humidified inspiratory oxygen flows (100% relative humidity at 37°C). Therefore, HFNC can provide high flows (up to 60 L/min) without discomfort. Moreover, HFNC improves oxygenation by exerting physiologic effects such as (a) dead-space washout and (b) moderate positive airway pressure...
2017: Anesthesia Progress
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28857852/effects-of-high-flow-nasal-cannula-on-the-work-of-breathing-in-patients-recovering-from-acute-respiratory-failure
#4
Mathieu Delorme, Pierre-Alexandre Bouchard, Mathieu Simon, Serge Simard, François Lellouche
OBJECTIVES: High-flow nasal cannula is increasingly used in the management of respiratory failure. However, little is known about its impact on respiratory effort, which could explain part of the benefits in terms of comfort and efficiency. This study was designed to assess the effects of high-flow nasal cannula on indexes of respiratory effort (i.e., esophageal pressure variations, esophageal pressure-time product/min, and work of breathing/min) in adults. DESIGN: A randomized controlled crossover study was conducted in 12 patients with moderate respiratory distress (i...
August 28, 2017: Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28830913/risk-factors-for-respiratory-decompensation-among-healthy-infants-with-bronchiolitis
#5
Nina M Dadlez, Nora Esteban-Cruciani, Asama Khan, Lindsey C Douglas, Yi Shi, William N Southern
BACKGROUND: Although most children with bronchiolitis only require supportive care, some decompensate and require ventilatory support. We examined predictors of respiratory decompensation among hospitalized children to identify which patients may benefit from expectant monitoring. METHODS: We examined children ≤24 months old with bronchiolitis admitted to the general infant and toddler floor. Children with pneumonia or comorbidities were excluded. Demographic and clinical characteristics were abstracted from a clinical database and medical records...
August 22, 2017: Hospital Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28828372/high-flow-nasal-oxygen-therapy-and-noninvasive-ventilation-in-the-management-of-acute-hypoxemic-respiratory-failure
#6
REVIEW
Jean-Pierre Frat, Rémi Coudroy, Nicolas Marjanovic, Arnaud W Thille
High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen therapy is a recent technique delivering a high flow of heated and humidified gas. HFNC is simpler to use and apply than noninvasive ventilation (NIV) and appears to be a good alternative treatment for hypoxemic acute respiratory failure (ARF). HFNC is better tolerated than NIV, delivers high fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2), generates a low level of positive pressure and provides washout of dead space in the upper airways, thereby improving mechanical pulmonary properties and unloading inspiratory muscles during ARF...
July 2017: Annals of Translational Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28818509/the-use-of-high-flow-nasal-cannula-in-the-pediatric-emergency-department
#7
REVIEW
Katherine N Slain, Steven L Shein, Alexandre T Rotta
OBJECTIVES: To summarize the current literature describing high-flow nasal cannula use in children, the components and mechanisms of action of a high-flow nasal cannula system, the appropriate clinical applications, and its role in the pediatric emergency department. SOURCES: A computer-based search of PubMed/MEDLINE and Google Scholar for literature on high-flow nasal cannula use in children was performed. DATA SUMMARY: High-flow nasal cannula, a non-invasive respiratory support modality, provides heated and fully humidified gas mixtures to patients via a nasal cannula interface...
August 15, 2017: Jornal de Pediatria
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28814254/bronchiolitis-care-in-the-hospital
#8
Jennifer Orr Vincent, Huay-Ying Lo, Susan Wu
BACKGROUND: Viral bronchiolitis is a common cause of hospitalization in young children, but despite a variety of therapeutic options, the mainstay of treatment remains supportive care. OBJECTIVE: To examine the most recent evidence for supportive care measures and pharmacologic options in the treatment of bronchiolitis in the hospital setting Methods: MEDLINE search with expert medical librarian for publications on management and therapies for bronchiolitis Results: Evidence does not support the use of bronchodilators, racemic epinephrine, deep suctioning, systemic corticosteroids, or antibiotics in the absence of a concomitant bacterial infection, as these treatments do not change the course of illness or shorten length of stay (LOS)...
August 16, 2017: Reviews on Recent Clinical Trials
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28794144/nasal-high-flow-therapy-a-novel-treatment-rather-than-a-more-expensive-oxygen-device
#9
REVIEW
Eleni Ischaki, Ioannis Pantazopoulos, Spyros Zakynthinos
Nasal high flow is a promising novel oxygen delivery device, whose mechanisms of action offer some beneficial effects over conventional oxygen systems. The administration of a high flow of heated and humidified gas mixture promotes higher and more stable inspiratory oxygen fraction values, decreases anatomical dead space and generates a positive airway pressure that can reduce the work of breathing and enhance patient comfort and tolerance. Nasal high flow has been used as a prophylactic tool or as a treatment device mostly in patients with acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure, with the majority of studies showing positive results...
September 30, 2017: European Respiratory Review: An Official Journal of the European Respiratory Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28780231/the-effect-of-high-flow-nasal-cannula-in-reducing-the-mortality-and-the-rate-of-endotracheal-intubation-when-used-before-mechanical-ventilation-compared-with-conventional-oxygen-therapy-and-noninvasive-positive-pressure-ventilation-a-systematic-review-and-meta
#10
Yue-Nan Ni, Jian Luo, He Yu, Dan Liu, Bin-Miao Liang, Zong-An Liang
BACKGROUND: The effects of high flow nasal cannula (HFNC) on adult patients when used before mechanical ventilation (MV) are unclear. We aimed to determine the effectiveness of HFNC when used before MV by comparison to conventional oxygen therapy (COT) and noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV). METHODS: The Pubmed, Embase, Medline, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) as well as the Information Sciences Institute (ISI) Web of Science were searched for all the controlled studies that compared HFNC with NIPPV and COT when used before MV in adult patients...
July 28, 2017: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28767471/high-flow-nasal-oxygen-in-patient-with-obstructive-sleep-apnea-undergoing-awake-craniotomy-a-case-report
#11
Jaclyn W M Wong, Amy H S Kong, Sau Yee Lam, Peter Y M Woo
Patients with obstructive sleep apnea are frequently considered unsuitable candidates for awake craniotomy due to anticipated problems with oxygenation, ventilation, and a potentially difficult airway. At present, only a handful of such accounts exist in the literature. Our report describes the novel use of high-flow nasal oxygen therapy for a patient with moderate obstructive sleep apnea who underwent an awake craniotomy under deep sedation. The intraoperative application of high-flow nasal oxygen therapy achieved satisfactory oxygenation, maintained the partial carbon dioxide pressure within a reasonable range even during periods of deep sedation, permitted responsive patient monitoring during mapping, and provided excellent patient and surgeon satisfaction...
August 1, 2017: A & A Case Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28766977/surgical-management-of-supraglottic-stenosis-using-intubationless-optiflow
#12
Kenric Tam, Caroline Jeffery, C Kwang Sung
OBJECTIVE: Airway management during endoscopic surgical treatment of supraglottic and pharyngeal stenosis is often challenging and can be accomplished by various means, including tracheostomy, jet ventilation, or direct laryngoscopy. We describe CO2 laser excision of supraglottic-pharyngeal stenosis using intubationless Optiflow high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC). METHODS: A 55-year-old male presented with dyspnea and dysphagia secondary to severe supraglottic-pharyngeal stenosis in the setting of previous chemoradiation for a T0N2aM0 squamous cell carcinoma...
September 2017: Annals of Otology, Rhinology, and Laryngology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28762180/optimum-support-by-high-flow-nasal-cannula-in-acute-hypoxemic-respiratory-failure-effects-of-increasing-flow-rates
#13
Tommaso Mauri, Laura Alban, Cecilia Turrini, Barbara Cambiaghi, Eleonora Carlesso, Paolo Taccone, Nicola Bottino, Alfredo Lissoni, Savino Spadaro, Carlo Alberto Volta, Luciano Gattinoni, Antonio Pesenti, Giacomo Grasselli
PURPOSE: Limited data exist on the correlation between higher flow rates of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) and its physiologic effects in patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (AHRF). We assessed the effects of HFNC delivered at increasing flow rate on inspiratory effort, work of breathing, minute ventilation, lung volumes, dynamic compliance and oxygenation in AHRF patients. METHODS: A prospective randomized cross-over study was performed in non-intubated patients with patients AHRF and a PaO2/FiO2 (arterial partial pressure of oxygen/fraction of inspired oxygen) ratio of ≤300 mmHg...
July 31, 2017: Intensive Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28750686/carbon-dioxide-narcosis-due-to-inappropriate-oxygen-delivery-a-case-report
#14
Thomas Herren, Eva Achermann, Thomas Hegi, Adrian Reber, Max Stäubli
BACKGROUND: Oxygen delivery to patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may be challenging because of their potential hypoxic ventilatory drive. However, some oxygen delivery systems such as non-rebreathing face masks with an oxygen reservoir bag require high oxygen flow for adequate oxygenation and to avoid carbon dioxide rebreathing. CASE PRESENTATION: A 72-year-old Caucasian man with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was admitted to the emergency department because of worsening dyspnea and an oxygen saturation of 81% measured by pulse oximetry...
July 28, 2017: Journal of Medical Case Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28737600/an-interprofessional-quality-improvement-initiative-to-standardize-pediatric-extubation-readiness-assessment
#15
Samer Abu-Sultaneh, Acrista J Hole, Alvaro J Tori, Brain D Benneyworth, Riad Lutfi, Christopher W Mastropietro
OBJECTIVES: Establishing protocols to wean mechanical ventilation and assess readiness for extubation, with the goal of minimizing morbidity associated with extubation failure and prolonged mechanical ventilation, have become increasingly important in contemporary PICUs. The aim of this quality improvement initiative is to establish a respiratory therapist-led daily spontaneous breathing trial protocol to standardize extubation readiness assessment and documentation in our PICU. DESIGN: A quality improvement project...
July 21, 2017: Pediatric Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28736002/high-flow-nasal-cannula-versus-noninvasive-ventilation-for-treatment-of-acute-hypoxemic-respiratory-failure-in-renal-transplant-recipients
#16
G Tu, H He, K Yin, M Ju, Y Zheng, D Zhu, Z Luo
OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the outcomes of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen therapy compared with noninvasive ventilation (NIV) for the treatment of acute hypoxemic respiratory failure in renal transplant recipients. METHODS: Data were retrospectively collected from a tertiary intensive care unit (ICU) from July 1, 2011, to September 31, 2015. All renal recipients who had acute respiratory failure at that period of time were classified into the HFNC or NIV group depending on the initial form of respiratory support...
July 2017: Transplantation Proceedings
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28728621/high-flow-heated-humidified-air-via-nasal-cannula-treats-cpap-intolerant-children-with-obstructive-sleep-apnea
#17
Stephen Hawkins, Stephanie Huston, Kristen Campbell, Ann Halbower
STUDY OBJECTIVES: Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is effective but challenging for children with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). High-flow air via open nasal cannula (HFNC) as treatment in children remains controversial. We report the efficacy of HFNC in children with OSA and CPAP intolerance, a titration protocol, and a discussion of potential mechanisms. METHODS: Patients aged 1 to 18 years with OSA (defined by obstructive apnea-hypopnea index [OAHI] greater than 1 event/h) and CPAP intolerance were enrolled...
August 15, 2017: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine: JCSM: Official Publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28711371/extubation-to-high-flow-nasal-cannula-in-critically-ill-surgical-patients
#18
Navpreet K Dhillon, Eric J T Smith, Ara Ko, Megan Y Harada, Danielle Polevoi, Richard Liang, Galinos Barmparas, Eric J Ley
BACKGROUND: High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) is increasingly used to reduce reintubations in patients with respiratory failure. Benefits include providing positive end expiratory pressure, reducing anatomical dead space, and decreasing work of breathing. We sought to compare outcomes of critically ill surgical patients extubated to HFNC versus conventional therapy. METHODS: A retrospective review was conducted in the surgical intensive care unit of an academic center during August 2015 to February 2016...
July 12, 2017: Journal of Surgical Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28701227/high-flow-nasal-cannula-oxygen-therapy-is-superior-to-conventional-oxygen-therapy-but-not-to-noninvasive-mechanical-ventilation-on-intubation-rate-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#19
Huiying Zhao, Huixia Wang, Feng Sun, Shan Lyu, Youzhong An
BACKGROUND: High-flow nasal cannula oxygen (HFNC) is a relatively new therapy used in adults with respiratory failure. Whether it is superior to conventional oxygen therapy (COT) or to noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether HFNC was superior to either COT or NIV in adult acute respiratory failure patients. METHODS: A review of the literature was conducted from the electronic databases from inception up to 20 October 2016...
July 12, 2017: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28700565/nasal-continuous-positive-airway-pressure-influences-bottle-feeding-in-preterm-lambs
#20
Nathalie Samson, Audrey Michaud, Rahmeh Othman, Charlène Nadeau, Stéphanie Nault, Danny Cantin, Michaël Sage, Céline Catelin, Jean-Paul Praud
BACKGROUND: In preterm infants, the time from initiation to full oral feeding can take weeks, which represents a very worrisome problem in neonatal medicine. Although current knowledge suggests that oral feeding should be introduced early, this is often delayed due to the need for prolonged nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP). Indeed, most caregivers fear that nCPAP could disrupt sucking-swallowing-breathing coordination and induce tracheal aspiration. The goal of the present study was to assess the impact of nCPAP delivered by the Infant Flow System on the physiology of sucking-swallowing-breathing coordination during bottle-feeding in preterm lambs over 24 h...
July 12, 2017: Pediatric Research
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