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High flow nasal oxygen

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28203744/acute-postoperative-hypoxemic-respiratory-failure-as-a-result-of-chilaiditi-s-syndrome-contribution-of-high-flow-oxygen-through-nasal-cannula
#1
S Poignant, J Moënne-Loccoz, B Cohen, M Laffon
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 1, 2017: British Journal of Anaesthesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28196293/developing-a-better-and-practical-definition-of-bronchopulmonary-dysplasia
#2
Sascha Meyer, Axel R Franz, Johannes Bay, Ludwig Gortner
The synopsis by Hines et al reports various definitions of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) (1). We agree there is a need to harmonise the definition of BPD and our definition (2) was adapted from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development network definition by Jobe and Bancalari (3) It incorporates important aspects that have evolved over time, such as the use of high-flow nasal cannulas, and takes into account differences between clinical centres, including different target oxygen saturations...
February 14, 2017: Acta Paediatrica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28174331/humidity-and-inspired-oxygen-concentration-during-high-flow-nasal-cannula-therapy-in-neonatal-and-infant-lung-models
#3
Yusuke Chikata, Saki Ohnishi, Masaji Nishimura
BACKGROUND: High-flow nasal cannula therapy (HFNC) for neonate/infants can deliver up to 10 L/min of heated and humidified gas, and FIO2 can be adjusted to between 0.21 and 1.0. With adults, humidification and actual FIO2 are known to vary according to inspiratory and HFNC gas flow, tidal volume (VT), and ambient temperature. There have been few studies focused on humidification and FIO2 in HFNC settings for neonates/infants, so we performed a bench study to investigate the influence of gas flow, ambient temperature, and respiratory parameters on humidification and actual FIO2 in a neonate/infant simulation...
February 7, 2017: Respiratory Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28161016/high-flow-warm-humidified-oxygen-versus-standard-low-flow-nasal-cannula-oxygen-for-moderate-bronchiolitis-hfwho-rct-an-open-phase-4-randomised-controlled-trial
#4
Elizabeth Kepreotes, Bruce Whitehead, John Attia, Christopher Oldmeadow, Adam Collison, Andrew Searles, Bernadette Goddard, Jodi Hilton, Mark Lee, Joerg Mattes
BACKGROUND: Bronchiolitis is the most common lung infection in infants and treatment focuses on management of respiratory distress and hypoxia. High-flow warm humidified oxygen (HFWHO) is increasingly used, but has not been rigorously studied in randomised trials. We aimed to examine whether HFWHO provided enhanced respiratory support, thereby shortening time to weaning off oxygen. METHODS: In this open, phase 4, randomised controlled trial, we recruited children aged less than 24 months with moderate bronchiolitis attending the emergency department of the John Hunter Hospital or the medical unit of the John Hunter Children's Hospital in New South Wales, Australia...
February 1, 2017: Lancet
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28157810/bayes-to-the-rescue-continuous-positive-airway-pressure-has-less-mortality-than-high-flow-oxygen
#5
Vicent Modesto I Alapont, Robinder G Khemani, Alberto Medina, Pablo Del Villar Guerra, Alfred Molina Cambra
OBJECTIVES: The merits of high-flow nasal cannula oxygen versus bubble continuous positive airway pressure are debated in children with pneumonia, with suggestions that randomized controlled trials are needed. In light of a previous randomized controlled trial showing a trend for lower mortality with bubble continuous positive airway pressure, we sought to determine the probability that a new randomized controlled trial would find high-flow nasal cannula oxygen superior to bubble continuous positive airway pressure through a "robust" Bayesian analysis...
February 2017: Pediatric Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28149597/nasal-high-flow-oxygen-therapy-after-extubation-the-road-is-open-but-don-t-drive-too-fast
#6
EDITORIAL
Antoine Rabbat, Kim Blanc, Aurélie Lefebvre, Christine Lorut
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2016: Journal of Thoracic Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28149541/high-flow-nasal-cannula-in-extubated-patients-is-it-advantageous-over-conventional-oxygen-therapy
#7
EDITORIAL
Jian-Jun Zhang, Bing Dai
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2016: Journal of Thoracic Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28124736/high-flow-nasal-cannula-hfnc-versus-nasal-continuous-positive-airway-pressure-ncpap-for-the-initial-respiratory-management-of-acute-viral-bronchiolitis-in-young-infants-a-multicenter-randomized-controlled-trial-tramontane-study
#8
Christophe Milési, Sandrine Essouri, Robin Pouyau, Jean-Michel Liet, Mickael Afanetti, Aurélie Portefaix, Julien Baleine, Sabine Durand, Clémentine Combes, Aymeric Douillard, Gilles Cambonie
PURPOSE: Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) is currently the gold standard for respiratory support for moderate to severe acute viral bronchiolitis (AVB). Although oxygen delivery via high flow nasal cannula (HFNC) is increasingly used, evidence of its efficacy and safety is lacking in infants. METHODS: A randomized controlled trial was performed in five pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) to compare 7 cmH2O nCPAP with 2 L/kg/min oxygen therapy administered with HFNC in infants up to 6 months old with moderate to severe AVB...
February 2017: Intensive Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28123947/nasal-high-flow-therapy-for-type-ii-respiratory-failure-in-copd-a-report-of-four-cases
#9
Ivan Pavlov, Patrice Plamondon, Stéphane Delisle
Herein we present a report of four cases of severe type II respiratory failure that had contraindications both to conventional non-invasive ventilation and to endotracheal intubation. In all four cases, we successfully used a high-flow nasal oxygen device as a rescue device, with very reassuring outcomes.
2017: Respiratory Medicine Case Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28110612/efficacy-of-high-flow-nasal-cannula-therapy-in-intensive-care-units
#10
Timothy N Liesching, Yuxiu Lei
PURPOSE: We conducted a meta-analysis to compare the physiological and clinical outcomes of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) with standard oxygen (O2) or conventional noninvasive ventilation (NIV) in intensive care units (ICUs). PROCEDURES: We selected the full-text prospective studies comparing HFNC with standard O2 or NIV in ICU. The continuous variables were analyzed with sample size-adjusted pooled t test. The categorical variables were extracted and combined for recalculating odds ratio...
January 1, 2017: Journal of Intensive Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28096239/skin-to-skin-care-in-preterm-infants-receiving-respiratory-support-does-not-lead-to-physiological-instability
#11
Laila Lorenz, Jennifer A Dawson, Hannah Jones, Susan E Jacobs, Jeanie L Cheong, Susan M Donath, Peter G Davis, C Omar F Kamlin
OBJECTIVE: Providing skin-to-skin care (SSC) to preterm infants is standard practice in many neonatal intensive care units. There are conflicting reports on the stability of oxygen saturation (SpO2) during SSC, which may create a barrier to a wider implementation of SSC to infants receiving respiratory support. Regional cerebral oxygenation (rcO2) measured using near-infrared spectroscopy can serve as a surrogate parameter for cerebral oxygen delivery and consumption. We hypothesised that rcO2 during SSC would be similar to standard care in preterm infants receiving respiratory support...
January 17, 2017: Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal Edition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28095826/non-invasive-respiratory-support-for-infants-with-bronchiolitis-a-national-survey-of-practice
#12
H Turnham, R S Agbeko, J Furness, J Pappachan, A G Sutcliffe, P Ramnarayan
BACKGROUND: Bronchiolitis is a common respiratory illness of early childhood. For most children it is a mild self-limiting disease but a small number of children develop respiratory failure. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) has traditionally been used to provide non-invasive respiratory support in these children, but there is little clinical trial evidence to support its use. More recently, high-flow nasal cannula therapy (HFNC) has emerged as a novel respiratory support modality...
January 17, 2017: BMC Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28089816/can-high-flow-nasal-cannula-reduce-the-rate-of-endotracheal-intubation-in-adult-patients-with-acute-respiratory-failure-compared-with-conventional-oxygen-therapy-and-noninvasive-positive-pressure-ventilation-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#13
Yue-Nan Ni, Jian Luo, He Yu, Dan Liu, Ni Zhong, Jiangli Cheng, Bin-Miao Liang, Zong-An Liang
BACKGROUND: The effects of high flow nasal cannula (HFNC) on adult patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF) are controversial. We aimed to further determine the effectiveness of HFNC in reducing the rate of endotracheal intubation in adult patients with ARF by comparison to noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) and conventional oxygen therapy (COT). METHODS: The Pubmed, Embase, Medline, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) as well as the Information Sciences Institute (ISI) Web of Science were searched for all the controlled studies that compared HFNC with NIPPV and COT in adult patients having ARF...
January 13, 2017: Chest
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28089165/high-flow-nasal-cannula-oxygen-for-reverting-severe-acute-exacerbation-of-chronic-obstructive-pulmonary-disease-a-case-report
#14
G Plotnikow, A W Thille, D Vasquez, R Pratto, P Desmery
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 11, 2017: Medicina Intensiva
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28072940/elective-use-of-veno-venous-extracorporeal-membrane-oxygenation-and-high-flow-nasal-oxygen-for-resection-of-subtotal-malignant-distal-airway-obstruction
#15
Rkf Fung, J Stellios, P G Bannon, A Ananda, P Forrest
We describe the use of peripheral veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV ECMO) and high-flow nasal oxygen as procedural support in a patient undergoing debulking of a malignant tumour of the lower airway. Due to the significant risk of complete airway obstruction upon induction of anaesthesia, ECMO was established while the patient was awake, and was maintained without systemic anticoagulation to minimise the risk of intraoperative bleeding. This case illustrates that ECMO support with high-flow nasal oxygen can be considered as part of the algorithm for airway management during surgery for subtotal lower airway obstruction, as it may be the only viable option for maintaining adequate gas exchange...
January 2017: Anaesthesia and Intensive Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28058020/high-flow-nasal-oxygen-availability-for-sedation-decreases-the-use-of-general-anesthesia-during-endoscopic-retrograde-cholangiopancreatography-and-endoscopic-ultrasound
#16
Roman Schumann, Nikola S Natov, Klifford A Rocuts-Martinez, Matthew D Finkelman, Tom V Phan, Sanjay R Hegde, Robert M Knapp
AIM: To examine whether high-flow nasal oxygen (HFNO) availability influences the use of general anesthesia (GA) in patients undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and associated outcomes. METHODS: In this retrospective study, patients were stratified into 3 eras between October 1, 2013 and June 30, 2014 based on HFNO availability for deep sedation at the time of their endoscopy. During the first and last 3-mo eras (era 1 and 3), no HFNO was available, whereas it was an option during the second 3-mo era (era 2)...
December 21, 2016: World Journal of Gastroenterology: WJG
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28054235/heated-humidified-high-flow-nasal-cannula-for-prevention-of-extubation-failure-in-preterm-infants
#17
Sasivimon Soonsawad, Buranee Swatesutipun, Anchalee Limrungsikul, Pracha Nuntnarumit
OBJECTIVES: To compare extubation failure rate between the heated humidified high-flow nasal cannula (HHHFNC) and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) groups. METHODS: Intubated infants with gestational age (GA) <32 wk, who were ready to extubate, were randomized to receive respiratory support with either CPAP or HHHFNC after extubation. In CPAP group, nasal mask CPAP with preset pressure and fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) equal to positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and FiO2 of ventilator before extubation was applied...
January 5, 2017: Indian Journal of Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28009154/high-flow-nasal-cannula-oxygen-therapy-work-in-progress-in-respiratory-critical-care
#18
Annia Schreiber, Fabiano DI Marco, Fulvio Braido, Paolo Solidoro
After a planned extubation, the re-occurrence of acute respiratory distress needing the restoration of invasive mechanical support is a severe phenomenon associated with several important consequences, including increased morbidity, Intensive Care Unit mortality, and an enormous financial burden. So far, the most commonly used techniques to ameliorate gas exchange in the postextubation period were low-flow oxygen therapy and non-invasive ventilation (NIV). High flows through nasal cannulae (HFNC) is a system which allows increased CO2 wash-out of anatomical dead space, positive nasopharyngeal pressure, a relatively constant FiO2, and an improvement of mucociliary function...
December 2016: Minerva Medica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28003694/the-all-india-difficult-airway-association-2016-guidelines-for-tracheal-intubation-in-the-intensive-care-unit
#19
Sheila Nainan Myatra, Syed Moied Ahmed, Pankaj Kundra, Rakesh Garg, Venkateswaran Ramkumar, Apeksh Patwa, Amit Shah, Ubaradka S Raveendra, Sumalatha Radhakrishna Shetty, Jeson Rajan Doctor, Dilip K Pawar, Singaravelu Ramesh, Sabyasachi Das, Jigeeshu Vasishtha Divatia
Tracheal intubation (TI) is a routine procedure in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and is often life-saving. In contrast to the controlled conditions in the operating room, critically ill patients with respiratory failure and shock are physiologically unstable. These factors, along with a suboptimal evaluation of the airway and limited oxygen reserves despite adequate pre-oxygenation, are responsible for a high incidence of life-threatening complications such as severe hypoxaemia and cardiovascular collapse during TI in the ICU...
December 2016: Indian Journal of Anaesthesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28003556/a-comparison-of-different-techniques-for-interfacing-capnography-with-adult-and-pediatric-supplemental-oxygen-masks
#20
Justin S Phillips, Lance P Pangilinan, Earl R E Mangalindan, Joseph L Booze, Richard H Kallet
BACKGROUND: Accurately measuring the partial pressure of end-tidal CO2 (PETCO2 ) in non-intubated patients is problematic due to dilution of expired CO2 at high O2 flows and mask designs that may either cause CO2 rebreathing or inadequately capture expired CO2. We evaluated the performance of 2 capnographic O2 masks (Cap-ONE and OxyMask) against a clinically expedient method using a standard O2 mask with a flow-directed nasal cannula used for capnography (CapnoLine) in a spontaneous breathing model of an adult and child under conditions of normal ventilation, hypoventilation, and hyperventilation...
January 2017: Respiratory Care
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