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Giant cell tumor of bone

Alireza Eajazi, Arvin Kheterpal, Susan Kattapuram, Gunnlaugur Petur Nielsen, Daniel Ira Rosenthal
We describe a patient with a history of giant cell tumor who over the course of 18 years developed multiple fat containing osseous lesions in the pelvis and spine. Two of these lesions subsequently evolved into biopsy proven giant cell tumor of bone. To our knowledge, this phenomenon of giant cell tumors evolving from fat containing lesions has not been described.
October 22, 2016: Skeletal Radiology
Nevzat Dabak, Hasan Göçer, Alper Çıraklı
BACKGROUND: Giant Cell Tumor is considered a benign, local and aggressive tumor. Although considered a benign bone tumor, it is still the subject of discussion and research because of the associated local bone destruction, as well as high rates of recurrence and distant metastases. Options are being developed for both surgical techniques and adjuvant therapies. AIMS: The present study evaluated the administration of cryotherapy via a pressurized-spray technique in giant cell tumors of the bone...
September 2016: Balkan Medical Journal
Mohammad-Ali Yazdani Abyaneh, Peter Engel, Andrzej Slominski, Bruce Ragsdale, Richard Agag, Daniel Cramer, J Andrew Carlson
BACKGROUND: Giant basal cell carcinomas (GBCCs), (BCC ≥ 5 cm), are often painless, destructive tumors resulting from poorly understood patient neglect. OBJECTIVES: To elucidate etiopathogenic factors distinguishing GBCC from basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and identify predictors for disease-specific death (DSD). METHODS: Case-control study examining clinicopathologic and neuroactive factors (β-endorphin, met-enkephalin, serotonin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and neurofilament expression) in GBCC and BCC...
October 18, 2016: American Journal of Dermatopathology
Bharat Rekhi, Vivek Verma, Ashish Gulia, Nirmala A Jambhekar, Subhash Desai, Shashikant L Juvekar, Jyoti Bajpai, Ajay Puri
Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is mostly a benign tumor, but associated with recurrences and metastasis. Lately, denosumab is being utilized in the treatment of certain GCTBs. Twenty-seven tumors, analyzed in the present study, occurred in 16 males and 11 females (M: F = 1.45:1), in the age-range of 16 to 47 years (mean = 29.5, median = 29). Most tumors were identified in the tibia(6) and femur(6), followed by the humerus(3), radius(3), pelvis(3), fibula(3), sacrum(1), metacarpal(1) and metatarsal(1) bones...
October 8, 2016: Pathology Oncology Research: POR
Matthias Benndorf, Jakob Neubauer, Mathias Langer, Elmar Kotter
PURPOSE: In the diagnostic process of primary bone tumors, patient age, tumor localization and to a lesser extent sex affect the differential diagnosis. We therefore aim to develop a pretest probability calculator for primary malignant bone tumors based on population data taking these variables into account. METHODS: We access the SEER (Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Program of the National Cancer Institute, 2015 release) database and analyze data of all primary malignant bone tumors diagnosed between 1973 and 2012...
October 8, 2016: International Journal of Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery
Achmad Fauzi Kamal, Agus Waryudi, Zuhri Effendi, Evelina Kodrat
INTRODUCTION: Prevalence of giant cell tumor (GCT) at atypical locations like bones of the feet are rare, seen in <1% of cases. GCT may have aggressive features, including cortical expansion or destruction with a soft-tissue component. Difficult diagnosis most often followed with complicated management and high recurrence rate remains a challenge that is rarely reported. PRESENTATION OF CASE: We presented a case of forty-six-year-old male patient with giant cell tumor of the right calcaneus Campanacci 3 with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC)...
September 28, 2016: International Journal of Surgery Case Reports
O B Pattanashetty, Dayanand B B, Arravind Pillai, Preetish Endigeri
INTRODUCTION: Dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma (DDCS) is a rare and malignant form of primary bone tumor refractive to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. It accounts for 1-2% of all primary bone tumors. Surgical resection, limb-salvage surgeries and amputation remain the mainstay of treatment. The prognosis of dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma is poor. CASE REPORT: We report a case of a 51-year-old male having a swelling and an ulcer distal to the left knee later diagnosed with dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma of proximal tibial and fibular metaphysis...
April 2016: Journal of Orthopaedic Case Reports
Czar Louie Gaston, Robert J Grimer, Michael Parry, Silvia Stacchiotti, Angelo Paolo Dei Tos, Hans Gelderblom, Stefano Ferrari, Giacomo G Baldi, Robin L Jones, Sant Chawla, Paolo Casali, Axel LeCesne, Jean-Yves Blay, Sander P D Dijkstra, David M Thomas, Piotr Rutkowski
Denosumab is a monoclonal antibody to RANK ligand approved for use in giant cell tumour (GCT) of bone. Due to its efficacy, Denosumab is recommended as the first option in inoperable or metastatic GCT. Denosumab has also been used pre-operatively to downstage tumours with large soft tissue extension to allow for less morbid surgery. The role of Denosumab for conventional limb GCT of bone is yet to be defined. Further studies are required to determine whether local recurrence rates will be decreased with the adjuvant use of Denosumab along with surgery...
2016: Clinical Sarcoma Research
Debajyoti Chatterjee, Kirti Gupta, Navneet Singla, Ankur Kapoor
While giant cell tumor is commonly a tumor of long bones, involvement of sphenoid bone is very rare. Clinically and radiologically, it mimics other neoplasms of this site. Endochondral ossification of this bone during development explains its curious preferential involvement in comparison to the rest of the skull bones. We describe an example of such a tumor arising in the sphenoid bone in a young woman and discuss the differential diagnosis. Recognizing its characteristic features is important for correct interpretation...
September 19, 2016: Clinical Neuropathology
Colin Burke, Thomas Link, Richard J O'Donnell, Soo-Jin Cho, Daria Motamedi
The exact location of origin for giant cell tumors of bone (GCTB) remains controversial, as lesions are not routinely imaged early but rather late when the tumor is large and clinically symptomatic. At the time of diagnosis, GCTB are classically described as lucent, eccentric lesions with nonsclerotic margins, located within the epiphysis to a greater extent than the metaphysis. Here we present a case of a biopsy proven GCTB initially incidentally seen on MRI as a small strictly metaphyseal lesion, which over the course of several years expanded across a closed physis to involve the epiphysis and abut the articular surface/subchondral bone plate...
2016: Case Reports in Radiology
Samuel C R Pallapati, Binu Prathap Thomas, George A Anderson
PURPOSE: Benign aggressive expansile osteolytic lesions such as giant cell tumors and aneurysmal bone cysts involving the metacarpal head pose problems in management. Unacceptably high rates of recurrence are reported after curettage and bone grafting. An en bloc excision of such tumors ideally requires osteoarticular replacement of the excised metacarpal heads to retain mobility and function. We used nonvascularized metatarsal head and shaft harvested from the foot to replace the metacarpal defect after en bloc resection to retain movement and function of metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint...
September 7, 2016: Journal of Hand Surgery
Deirdre Kelly, Sarah Mc Erlean, Danielle Byrne, Peter Mac Mahon, John Mc Caffrey
Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is a rare condition with distinct radiological features that aid diagnosis. We present the case of an adult female patient, with locally invasive GCTB and review important radiological and management principles. Specific radiological features include locally aggressive, lytic radiolucent lesions, which can demonstrate cortical thinning and expansile remodeling of bone and typically involve the epiphysis and metaphysis. Management is primarily surgical, and denosumab has a role in the advanced setting...
September 2016: Radiology case reports
A F Kamal, E L Simbolon, Y Prabowo, E U Hutagalung
PURPOSE: To determine the association between type of surgery (wide resection versus curettage with adjuvant therapy) and outcome in patients with giant cell tumour (GCT) of bone. METHODS: Records of 30 male and 52 female consecutive patients aged 10 to 62 years who underwent wide resection (n=57) or curettage with adjuvant therapy (n=25) for primary GCT of bone were reviewed. The surgical decision was based on patient age, tumour location, functional demand, and patient preference...
August 2016: Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery
Daniel Branstetter, Kathy Rohrbach, Li-Ya Huang, Rosalia Soriano, Mark Tometsko, Michelle Blake, Allison P Jacob, William C Dougall
Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) is an essential mediator of osteoclast formation, function and survival. In patients with solid tumor metastasis to the bone, targeting the bone microenvironment by inhibition of RANKL using denosumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody (mAb) specific to RANKL, has been demonstrated to prevent tumor-induced osteolysis and subsequent skeletal complications. Recently, a prominent functional role for the RANKL pathway has emerged in the primary bone tumor giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB)...
September 2015: Journal of Bone Oncology
Frankie K Wong, Zachary S Zumsteg, Claude-Jean Langevin, Nabilah Ali, Shawn Maclary, Bonnie L Balzer, Allen S Ho
Primary mucinous adenocarcinomas of the salivary gland are rare malignancies defined by aggregates of epithelial cells suspended in large pools of extracellular mucin. We report a case of a giant mucinous adenocarcinoma of salivary gland origin, with low-grade cytoarchitectural features and neuroendocrine differentiation arising in the submental region. Grossly, the tumor measured 12.5 × 13.4 × 8.2 cm and replaced the bone and soft tissues of the anterior oral cavity. Microscopically, the neoplasm was composed of large extracellular pools of mucin, which contained papillary and acinar aggregates, and small nodules of ductal type epithelium with minimal nuclear enlargement, powdery chromatin and little pleomorphism...
August 17, 2016: Head and Neck Pathology
Alyaa Al-Ibraheemi, Carrie Y Inwards, Riyam T Zreik, Doris E Wenger, Sarah M Jenkins, Jodi M Carter, Jennifer M Boland, Peter S Rose, Long Jin, Andre M Oliveira, Karen J Fritchie
Although the majority of giant cell tumors (GCTs) of the bone occur in adult patients, occasionally they arise in the pediatric population. In this setting they may be mistaken for tumors more commonly seen in this age group, including osteosarcoma, aneurysmal bone cyst, and chondroblastoma. All cases of primary GCT of the bone arising in patients 18 years and below were retrieved from our institutional archives and examined with emphasis on the evaluation of various morphologic patterns. Clinical/radiologic records were reviewed when available...
August 11, 2016: American Journal of Surgical Pathology
Roberto Clayton Lima Oliveira Júnior, Marcelo Glauber da Silva Pereira, Pedro Braga Linhares Garcia, Patrícia Albuquerque Dos Santos, Amanda Dos Santos Cavalcanti, Walter Meohas
OBJECTIVE: Giant cell tumors are benign bone neoplasms that are relatively rare in adults and their biological behavior is still unpredictable. The incidence of local recurrence has presented variation between 0% and 65% in studies conducted worldwide, but few data are available on this complication in the Brazilian population. METHODS: Information on 155 patients with confirmed histological diagnoses of giant cell tumor who were treated in our institution's orthopedic oncology service between January 2000 and July 2014 was gathered...
July 2016: Revista Brasileira de Ortopedia
Ai Mitsui, Hisashi Saji, Masatomo Doi, Masahiro Hoshikawa, Akinobu Hayashi, Haruhiko Nakamura
Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) usually appears as a benign tumor. We describe an extremely rare case of a metastatic pleural tumor arising from a benign GCTB. The patient had undergone radial resection of a GCTB in his left wrist. After 6 years, he was sent to us for diagnosis of a large mass detected upon routine radiographic screening. We resected the tumor, which was found to be a solitary pleural metastasis of GCTB and had evidently spread arterially. To our knowledge, this is the first report of its kind...
May 2016: Respirology Case Reports
Iulian Daniel Vîlcioiu, Dragoş George Zamfirescu, Ioan Cristescu, Andrei Ursache, Şerban Arghir Popescu, Cosmin Antoniu Creangă, Ioan Lascăr
Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) represents one of the commonest bone tumors encountered by an orthopedic surgeon. The giant-cell tumor is generally classified as benign but the fast growing rhythm and the aggressive soft-tissue invasion may in some cases demonstrate a malign potential of the tumor. We present the case of an aggressive giant cell tumor in a young patient that was first diagnosed in our emergency department with a fracture of the distal femur after a low energy trauma. With further examinations, we discovered that the tumor was invading the both femoral condyles and was vascularized by three major arterial pedicles...
2016: Romanian Journal of Morphology and Embryology, Revue Roumaine de Morphologie et Embryologie
Raju Vaishya, Chirag Kapoor, Paresh Golwala, Amit Kumar Agarwal, Vipul Vijay
Giant Cell Tumour (GCT) of the distal fibula is extremely rare and poses challenges in the surgical management. Wide excision or intralesional curettage, along with adjuvant chemical cauterisation can prevent the recurrence of GCT. The excised bone gap needs reconstruction using tricortical iliac autograft and supportive plate fixation. In addition to wide excision, preservation of ankle mortise is advisable in locally aggressive and large lesions of the distal fibula. We report a GCT of the distal fibula in a young female patient...
2016: Curēus
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