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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27914303/a-necessary-evil-residential-placement-of-people-with-intellectual-disability-among-the-palestinian-minority-in-israel
#1
Kareem Nasser, Dalia Sachs, Amalia Sa'ar
Among the Palestinian minority in Israel, residential placement of people with intellectual disabilities [ID] is relatively new and steadily increasing, but poorly studied. A qualitative design was used to explore the process of residential placement decision by 18 parents of people with ID through semi-structured interviews. Sampling was purposive and data was analyzed thematically. Four main themes emerged representing parents' perceptions and experiences along the placement decision-making process, together indicating an experience of deeply 'conflicted parenting': (a) initial resistance to placement and its perception as abandonment and parental failure; (b) attrition following cumulative difficulties and lack of assistance; (c) resignation and reframing of placement as a necessary evil; (d) relief mixed with guilt, pain, and ambivalence following placement...
November 30, 2016: Research in Developmental Disabilities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27914254/glycosaminoglycans-gags-and-gag-mimetics-regulate-the-behavior-of-stem-cell-differentiation
#2
REVIEW
Mengmeng Wang, Xiaoli Liu, Zhonglin Lyu, Hao Gu, Dan Li, Hong Chen
Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are linear sulfated polysaccharides that exist in most mammalian cells. By undergoing conjugation with various proteins, GAGs play important roles in a variety of bioactivities, including promoting stem cell differentiation. However, they have their own intrinsic disadvantages that limit their further applications for cell therapy and tissue engineering. Therefore, more and more GAG-mimetic materials have been studied as natural GAG analogs for emerging applications. This review explains the mechanism of how GAGs regulate stem cell differentiation and elaborates on the current progress of the applications of GAG-based materials on regulating stem cell differentiation...
November 20, 2016: Colloids and Surfaces. B, Biointerfaces
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27912679/three-pillars-for-the-neural-control-of-appetite
#3
Scott M Sternson, Anne-Kathrin Eiselt
The neural control of appetite is important for understanding motivated behavior along with the present rising prevalence of obesity. Over the past several years, new tools for cell type-specific neuron activity monitoring and perturbation have enabled increasingly detailed analyses of the mechanisms underlying appetite-control systems. Three major neural circuits strongly and acutely influence appetite but with notably different characteristics. Although these circuits interact, they have distinct properties and thus appear to contribute to separate but interlinked processes influencing appetite, thereby forming three pillars of appetite control...
November 28, 2016: Annual Review of Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27912247/molecular-evolution-in-insect-societies-an-eco-evo-devo-synthesis
#4
Amy L Toth, Sandra M Rehan
The evolution of eusociality is a perennial issue in evolutionary biology, and genomic advances have fueled steadily growing interest in the genetic changes underlying social evolution. Along with a recent flurry of research on comparative and evolutionary genomics in different eusocial insect groups (bees, ants, wasps, and termites), several mechanistic explanations have emerged to describe the molecular evolution of eusociality from solitary behavior. These include solitary physiological ground plans, genetic toolkits of deeply conserved genes, evolutionary changes in protein-coding genes, cis regulation, and the structure of gene networks, epigenetics, and novel genes...
November 28, 2016: Annual Review of Entomology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27911775/how-constraints-affect-the-hunter-s-decision-to-shoot-a-deer
#5
Florian K Diekert, Andries Richter, Inger Maren Rivrud, Atle Mysterud
Hunting is the predominant way of controlling many wildlife populations devoid of large carnivores. It subjects animals to mortality rates that far exceed natural rates and that differ markedly in which age, sex, or size classes are removed relative to those of natural predators. To explain the emerging selection pattern we develop behavioral microfoundations for a hunting model, emphasizing in particular the constraints given by the formal and informal norms, rules, and regulations that govern the hunter's choice...
November 28, 2016: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27911770/the-right-incentives-enable-ocean-sustainability-successes-and-provide-hope-for-the-future
#6
Jane Lubchenco, Elizabeth B Cerny-Chipman, Jessica N Reimer, Simon A Levin
Healthy ocean ecosystems are needed to sustain people and livelihoods and to achieve the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. Using the ocean sustainably requires overcoming many formidable challenges: overfishing, climate change, ocean acidification, and pollution. Despite gloomy forecasts, there is reason for hope. New tools, practices, and partnerships are beginning to transform local fisheries, biodiversity conservation, and marine spatial planning. The challenge is to bring them to a global scale...
December 2, 2016: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27911751/the-lateral-habenula-circuitry-reward-processing-and-cognitive-control
#7
Phillip M Baker, Thomas Jhou, Bo Li, Masayuki Matsumoto, Sheri J Y Mizumori, Marcus Stephenson-Jones, Aleksandra Vicentic
There has been a growing interest in understanding the role of the lateral habenula (LHb) in reward processing, affect regulation, and goal-directed behaviors. The LHb gets major inputs from the habenula-projecting globus pallidus and the mPFC, sending its efferents to the dopaminergic VTA and SNc, serotonergic dorsal raphe nuclei, and the GABAergic rostromedial tegmental nucleus. Recent studies have made advances in our understanding of the LHb circuit organization, yet the precise mechanisms of its involvement in complex behaviors are largely unknown...
November 9, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27911750/homeostasis-meets-motivation-in-the-battle-to-control-food-intake
#8
Carrie R Ferrario, Gwenaël Labouèbe, Shuai Liu, Edward H Nieh, Vanessa H Routh, Shengjin Xu, Eoin C O'Connor
Signals of energy homeostasis interact closely with neural circuits of motivation to control food intake. An emerging hypothesis is that the transition to maladaptive feeding behavior seen in eating disorders or obesity may arise from dysregulation of these interactions. Focusing on key brain regions involved in the control of food intake (ventral tegmental area, striatum, hypothalamus, and thalamus), we describe how activity of specific cell types embedded within these regions can influence distinct components of motivated feeding behavior...
November 9, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27911741/neural-stem-cells-to-cerebral-cortex-emerging-mechanisms-regulating-progenitor-behavior-and-productivity
#9
Noelle D Dwyer, Bin Chen, Shen-Ju Chou, Simon Hippenmeyer, Laurent Nguyen, H Troy Ghashghaei
This review accompanies a 2016 SFN mini-symposium presenting examples of current studies that address a central question: How do neural stem cells (NSCs) divide in different ways to produce heterogeneous daughter types at the right time and in proper numbers to build a cerebral cortex with the appropriate size and structure? We will focus on four aspects of corticogenesis: cytokinesis events that follow apical mitoses of NSCs; coordinating abscission with delamination from the apical membrane; timing of neurogenesis and its indirect regulation through emergence of intermediate progenitors; and capacity of single NSCs to generate the correct number and laminar fate of cortical neurons...
November 9, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27911678/negative-religious-rhetoric-in-the-lives-of-black-cisgender-queer-emerging-adult-men-a-qualitative-analysis
#10
Ja'Nina J Garrett-Walker, Vanessa M Torres
Given the intersection of racial, religious, and sexual identities for Black queer populations, the current study examines sexuality related religious rhetoric. Twenty Black cisgender queer men were recruited to participate in a qualitative interview. Using thematic analysis, the research team identified four themes: negative religious rhetoric, personal consequences of negative religious rhetoric, social consequences of negative religious rhetoric, and growth from negative religious rhetoric. Participants explained the pervasiveness of negative religious rhetoric within their churches and family structures...
December 2, 2016: Journal of Homosexuality
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27911583/advancing-research-on-structural-stigma-and-sexual-orientation-disparities-in-mental-health-among-youth
#11
Mark L Hatzenbuehler
Psychological research on stigma has focused largely on the perceptions of stigmatized individuals and their interpersonal interactions with the nonstigmatized. This work has been critical in documenting many of the ways in which stigma operates to harm those who are targeted. However, this research has also tended to overlook broader structural forms of stigma, which refer to societal-level conditions, cultural norms, and institutional policies and practices that constrain the lives of the stigmatized. In this article I describe the emerging field of research on structural stigma and review evidence documenting the harmful consequences of structural stigma for the mental/behavioral health of lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth...
December 2, 2016: Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27911551/superconductivity-emerging-from-an-electronic-phase-separation-in-the-charge-ordered-phase-of-rbfe_-2-as_-2
#12
E Civardi, M Moroni, M Babij, Z Bukowski, P Carretta
^{75}As, ^{87}Rb, and ^{85}Rb nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) and ^{87}Rb nuclear magnetic resonance measurements in a RbFe_{2}As_{2} iron-based superconductor are presented. We observe a marked broadening of the ^{75}As NQR spectrum below T_{0}≃140  K which is associated with the onset of a charge order in the FeAs planes. Below T_{0} we observe a power-law decrease in the ^{75}As nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate down to T^{*}≃20  K. Below T^{*} the nuclei start to probe different dynamics owing to the different local electronic configurations induced by the charge order...
November 18, 2016: Physical Review Letters
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27911534/structural-transitions-in-densifying-networks
#13
R Lambiotte, P L Krapivsky, U Bhat, S Redner
We introduce a minimal generative model for densifying networks in which a new node attaches to a randomly selected target node and also to each of its neighbors with probability p. The networks that emerge from this copying mechanism are sparse for p<1/2 and dense (average degree increasing with number of nodes N) for p≥1/2. The behavior in the dense regime is especially rich; for example, individual network realizations that are built by copying are disparate and not self-averaging. Further, there is an infinite sequence of structural anomalies at p=2/3, 3/4, 4/5, etc...
November 18, 2016: Physical Review Letters
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27910972/a-liver-microphysiological-system-of-tumor-cell-dormancy-and-inflammatory-responsiveness-is-affected-by-scaffold-properties
#14
A M Clark, S E Wheeler, C L Young, L Stockdale, J Shepard Neiman, W Zhao, D B Stolz, R Venkataramanan, D Lauffenburger, L Griffith, A Wells
Distant metastasis is the major cause of breast cancer-related mortality, commonly emerging clinically after 5 or more years of seeming 'cure' of the primary tumor, indicating a quiescent dormancy. The lack of relevant accessible model systems for metastasis that recreate this latent stage has hindered our understanding of the molecular basis and the development of therapies against these lethal outgrowths. We previously reported on the development of an all-human 3D ex vivo hepatic microphysiological system that reproduces several features of liver physiology and enables spontaneous dormancy in a subpopulation of breast cancer cells...
December 2, 2016: Lab on a Chip
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27910820/4d-bioprinting-the-next-generation-technology-for-biofabrication-enabled-by-stimuli-responsive-materials
#15
Yi-Chen Li, Yu Shrike Zhang, Ali Akpek, Su Ryon Shin, Ali Khademhosseini
Four-dimensional (4D) bioprinting, encompassing a wide range of disciplines including bioengineering, materials science, chemistry, and computer sciences, is emerging as the next-generation biofabrication technology. By utilizing stimuli-responsive materials and advanced three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting strategies, 4D bioprinting aims to create dynamic 3D patterned biological structures that can transform their shapes or behavior under various stimuli. In this review, we highlight the potential use of various stimuli-responsive materials for 4D printing and their extension into biofabrication...
December 2, 2016: Biofabrication
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27909954/fortifying-the-corrective-nature-of-post-publication-peer-review-identifying-weaknesses-use-of-journal-clubs-and-rewarding-conscientious-behavior
#16
Jaime A Teixeira da Silva, Aceil Al-Khatib, Judit Dobránszki
Most departments in any field of science that have a sound academic basis have discussion groups or journal clubs in which pertinent and relevant literature is frequently discussed, as a group. This paper shows how such discussions could help to fortify the post-publication peer review (PPPR) movement, and could thus fortify the value of traditional peer review, if their content and conclusions were made known to the wider academic community. Recently, there are some tools available for making PPPR viable, either as signed (PubMed Commons) or anonymous comments (PubPeer), or in a hybrid format (Publons)...
December 1, 2016: Science and Engineering Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27909945/individual-differences-in-diurnal-preference-and-time-of-exercise-interact-to-predict-exercise-frequency
#17
Garrett C Hisler, Alison L Phillips, Zlatan Krizan
BACKGROUND: Diurnal preference (and chronotype more generally) has been implicated in exercise behavior, but this relation has not been examined using objective exercise measurements nor have potential psychosocial mediators been examined. Furthermore, time-of-day often moderates diurnal preference's influence on outcomes, and it is unknown whether time-of-exercise may influence the relation between chronotype and exercise frequency. PURPOSE: The current study examined whether individual differences in diurnal preference ("morningness-eveningness") predict unique variance in exercise frequency and if commonly studied psychosocial variables mediate this relation (i...
December 1, 2016: Annals of Behavioral Medicine: a Publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27909841/the-shaping-of-intrinsic-membrane-potential-oscillations-positive-negative-feedback-ionic-resonance-amplification-nonlinearities-and-time-scales
#18
Horacio G Rotstein
The generation of intrinsic subthreshold (membrane potential) oscillations (STOs) in neuronal models requires the interaction between two processes: a relatively fast positive feedback that favors changes in voltage and a slower negative feedback that opposes these changes. These are provided by the so-called resonant and amplifying gating variables associated to the participating ionic currents. We investigate both the biophysical and dynamic mechanisms of generation of STOs and how their attributes (frequency and amplitude) depend on the model parameters for biophysical (conductance-based) models having qualitatively different types of resonant currents (activating and inactivating) and an amplifying current...
December 1, 2016: Journal of Computational Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27909418/risk-and-ambiguity-in-information-seeking-eye-gaze-patterns-reveal-contextual-behavior-in-dealing-with-uncertainty
#19
Peter Wittek, Ying-Hsang Liu, Sándor Darányi, Tom Gedeon, Ik Soo Lim
Information foraging connects optimal foraging theory in ecology with how humans search for information. The theory suggests that, following an information scent, the information seeker must optimize the tradeoff between exploration by repeated steps in the search space vs. exploitation, using the resources encountered. We conjecture that this tradeoff characterizes how a user deals with uncertainty and its two aspects, risk and ambiguity in economic theory. Risk is related to the perceived quality of the actually visited patch of information, and can be reduced by exploiting and understanding the patch to a better extent...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27909399/a-subset-of-autism-associated-genes-regulate-the-structural-stability-of-neurons
#20
REVIEW
Yu-Chih Lin, Jeannine A Frei, Michaela B C Kilander, Wenjuan Shen, Gene J Blatt
Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) comprises a range of neurological conditions that affect individuals' ability to communicate and interact with others. People with ASD often exhibit marked qualitative difficulties in social interaction, communication, and behavior. Alterations in neurite arborization and dendritic spine morphology, including size, shape, and number, are hallmarks of almost all neurological conditions, including ASD. As experimental evidence emerges in recent years, it becomes clear that although there is broad heterogeneity of identified autism risk genes, many of them converge into similar cellular pathways, including those regulating neurite outgrowth, synapse formation and spine stability, and synaptic plasticity...
2016: Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience
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