Read by QxMD icon Read


Vivek Sagar, Thorsten Kahnt
Memorable positive and negative experiences produce different profiles of gene expression in brain areas associated with long-term memory.
March 21, 2018: ELife
Jun Yin, Man Chen, Xiaoting Wang, Xiaowei Ding
The chasing action, in which an actor chases a target, is a fundamental activity for the evolutionary shaping of social abilities. Where previous research has emphasized the chaser's role, the current study explored whether the fleeing responsivity of a chased target influences the cognitive representation of the chasing action. We investigated this with a change-detection task, in which a set of chasing actions, either exhibiting or not exhibiting fleeing behavior, were memorized in sequence, and it was tested whether a memorized action reappeared after altering an object's appearance...
March 19, 2018: Attention, Perception & Psychophysics
Harmen B Gudde, Debra Griffiths, Kenny R Coventry
The memory game paradigm is a behavioral procedure to explore the relationship between language, spatial memory, and object knowledge. Using two different versions of the paradigm, spatial language use and memory for object location are tested under different, experimentally manipulated conditions. This allows us to tease apart proposed models explaining the influence of object knowledge on spatial language (e.g., spatial demonstratives), and spatial memory, as well as understanding the parameters that affect demonstrative choice and spatial memory more broadly...
February 19, 2018: Journal of Visualized Experiments: JoVE
Camillo Lamanna
Narrative medicine explores the stories that patients tell; this paper, conversely, looks at some of the stories that patients are told. The paper starts by examining the 'story' told by the Shambaa people of Tanzania to explain the bubonic plague and contrasts this with the stories told by Ghanaian communities to explain lymphatic filariasis. By harnessing insights from memory studies, these stories' memorability is claimed to be due to their use mnemonic devices woven into stories. The paper suggests that stories can be unpatronising, informative, and appropriate vehicles for communicating medical information to all age groups across all cultures...
March 19, 2018: Journal of Medical Humanities
Erik M Benau, Laura C DeLoretta, Stephen T Moelter
In the present study, healthy undergraduates were asked to identify if a visual stimulus appeared on screen for the same duration as a memorized target (2 s) while event-related potentials (ERP) were recorded. Trials consisted of very short (1.25 s), short (1.6 s), target (2 s), long (2.5 s) or very long (3.125 s) durations, and a yes or no response was required on each trial. We examined behavioral response as signal detection (d') and response bias via a Generalized Accuracy Coefficient (GAC)...
March 15, 2018: Brain and Cognition
Ziv Bell, Tiffany Shader, Carolyn Webster-Stratton, M Jamila Reid, Theodore P Beauchaine
Abnormal patterns of sympathetic- and parasympathetic- linked cardiac activity and reactivity are observed among externalizing children, and mark deficiencies in central nervous system regulation of behavior and emotion. Although changes in these biomarkers have been observed following treatment, mechanisms remain unexplored. We used MEMORE-a new approach to analyzing intervening variable effects-to evaluate improvements in parenting as mediators of changes in SNS- and PNS-linked cardiac activity and reactivity among 99 preschoolers with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder who were treated using an empirically supported intervention...
2018: Clinical Psychological Science
Erin L Beatty, Alexandra Muller-Gass, Dorothy Wojtarowicz, Marie-Eve Jobidon, Ingrid Smith, Quan Lam, Oshin Vartanian
Humans rely on topographical memory to encode information about spatial aspects of environments. However, even though people adopt different strategies when learning new maps, little is known about the impact of those strategies on topographical memory, and their neural correlates. To examine that issue, we presented participants with 40 unfamiliar maps, each of which displayed one major route and three landmarks. Half were instructed to memorize the maps by focusing on the route, whereas the other half memorized the maps by focusing on the landmarks...
March 14, 2018: Neuroreport
Lotte F van Dillen, Henk van Steenbergen
The present research examined whether cognitive load modulates the neural processing of appetitive, high-calorie food stimuli. In a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, participants quickly categorized high-calorie and low-calorie food pictures versus object pictures as edible or inedible while they concurrently performed a digit-span task that varied between low and high cognitive load (memorizing six digits vs. one digit). In line with predictions, the digit-span task engaged the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) when cognitive load was high compared to low...
March 14, 2018: Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience
Urvish Joshi, Sheetal Vyas
Background and Objectives: Current programs in medical education technology concentrate mainly upon "how-to-teach." The focus is needed on learner's memory retention too. An innovative strategy like concept mapping might be a way forward. The study was carried out to assess its effectiveness and to know students' perceptions. Materials and Methods: During community medicine classes, a student-group was sensitized on how to make and use concept maps out of taught contents...
January 2018: Indian Journal of Community Medicine
Dale Hancock, Nicole Hare, Paul Denny, Gareth Denyer
Disciplines such as Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, which involve concepts not included in the high-school curriculum, are very challenging for many first year university students. These subjects are particularly difficult for students accustomed to surface learning strategies involving memorization and recall of facts, as a deeper understanding of the relationship between concepts is needed for successful transfer to related areas and subsequent study. In this article, we explore an activity in a very large first year Molecular Biology course, in which students create multiple-choice questions related to targeted learning outcomes, and then answer and evaluate one another's questions...
March 12, 2018: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education
Angelina J Mosley, E Rachel Roberts, Hazel Partington, Katharina Gaertner, Peter Fisher, A L B Lex Rutten, Robert T Mathie, Steven J Cartwright, Alison Fixsen, Maria Olga Kokornaczyk, Anezka Marie Sokol, Alexander L Tournier
The third international conference on "Cutting Edge Research in Homeopathy" organised by the Homeopathy Research Institute (HRI) was held on the inspiring and historic island of Malta from 9th to 11th of June, 2017. One hundred and two abstracts underwent peer review by the HRI Scientific Advisory Committee and external experts to produce the programme of 36 oral presentations and 37 posters, presented by researchers from 19 countries. The 2.5-day programme covered a diverse range of topics, including quantitative and qualitative clinical research, basic research, veterinary research, and provings...
February 2018: Homeopathy: the Journal of the Faculty of Homeopathy
Xin Zhao, Jinyu Liu, Shijun Yang, Dandan Song, Chen Wang, Chen Chen, Chengcheng Wang, Feifei Pu, Runmei Yang, Xiaoya Li, Qiuting Wang, Shasha Ge, Yulin Lin, Xiuhua Liu, Dayong Cai
Vascular dementia (VaD) is the common cognitive disorder derived mainly from lacunar stroke. The neurovascular coupling (NVC) dysfunction involves in its pathogenesis. VaD lacks suitable animal models for developing preventive therapies. This study aimed to confirm a model for preventing VaD via maintaing NVC sensitivity in rats. The model was replicated with autologous microthrombi against the background of hypercholesterolemia. A phosphodiesterase inhibitor (pentoxyfylline) was preventively administrated to confirm the role of NVC sensitivity...
March 8, 2018: European Journal of Pharmacology
Clément Belletier, Valérie Camos
Recent studies suggest that social presence undermines performance in difficult tasks because the presence of others would automatically capture the attention needed to achieve these tasks. Here, we tested whether this attentional capture (caused by the experimenter presence) affects working memory. Several models suggest that maintenance in working memory relies on an attentional mechanism. Besides this mechanism, another nonattentional verbal rehearsal could also maintain verbal information. In experiment 1, we varied the presence of the experimenter while participants had to memorize letters during a short retention interval...
March 10, 2018: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Michael P Bogenschutz, Samantha K Podrebarac, Jessie H Duane, Sean S Amegadzie, Tara C Malone, Lindsey T Owens, Stephen Ross, Sarah E Mennenga
After a hiatus of some 40 years, clinical research has resumed on the use of classic hallucinogens to treat addiction. Following completion of a small open-label feasibility study, we are currently conducting a double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial of psilocybin-assisted treatment of alcohol use disorder. Although treatment effects cannot be analyzed until the study is complete, descriptive case studies provide a useful window into the therapeutic process of psychedelic-assisted treatment of addiction...
2018: Frontiers in Pharmacology
Chawki Jebali, Lotfi Boukadida, Ali Ousgi, Wael Chaabene, Borhen Shili, Mohamed Amin Naggara, Riadh Boukef
INTRODUCTION: Inhaled nitrous oxide (MEOPA) ensures short-term analgesia of a patient in spontaneous ventilation through a mask. It ensures analgesic coverage during the painful gesture while saving to the patient the phenomena of memorization. AIM: To study the efficacy and safety of the use of MEOPA during the make stitches. METHODS: Randomized double blind prospective study including any patient aged > 16 years admitted to the emergency for make stitches during a period of 3 months...
June 2017: La Tunisie Médicale
Tomer J Czaczkes, Birgit Brandstetter, Isabella di Stefano, Jürgen Heinze
Expending effort is generally considered to be undesirable. However, both humans and vertebrates will work for a reward they could also get for free. Moreover, cues associated with high-effort rewards are preferred to low-effort associated cues. Many explanations for these counterintuitive findings have been suggested, including cognitive dissonance (self-justification) or a greater contrast in state (e.g., energy or frustration level) before and after an effort-linked reward. Here, we test whether effort expenditure also increases perceived value in ants, using both classical cue-association methods and pheromone deposition, which correlates with perceived value...
March 5, 2018: Journal of Comparative Psychology
Keisuke Tani, Yoshihide Shiraki, Shinji Yamamoto, Yasushi Kodaka, Keisuke Kushiro
In our day-to-day life, we can accurately reach for an object in our gravitational environment without any effort. This can be achieved even when the body is tilted relative to gravity. This is accomplished by the central nervous system (CNS) compensation for gravitational forces and torque acting on the upper limbs, based on the magnitude of body tilt. The present study investigated how performance of upper limb movements was influenced by the alteration of body orientation relative to gravity. We observed the spatial trajectory of the index finger while the upper limb reached for a memorized target with the body tilted in roll plane...
2018: Frontiers in Psychology
R Rodney Howell
Mike, a memorable young patient with untreated phenylketonuria, as well as others affected by genetic disorders that could be treated if diagnosed in infancy, launched my six-decade career. This autobiographical article reflects on my childhood, early research, and professional experiences in pediatric genetics. My laboratory research focused on inborn errors of metabolism, including the glycogen storage diseases. My effort to organize newborn screening through the recommended uniform screening panel shaped and standardized newborn screening nationwide...
March 1, 2018: Annual Review of Genomics and Human Genetics
M Wierzba, M Riegel, M Wypych, K Jednoróg, A Grabowska, A Marchewka
It is widely accepted that people differ in memory performance. The ability to control one's memory depends on multiple factors, including the emotional properties of the memorized material. While it was widely demonstrated that emotion can facilitate memory, it is unclear how emotion modifies our ability to suppress memory. One of the reasons for the lack of consensus among researchers is that individual differences in memory performance were largely neglected in previous studies. We used the directed forgetting paradigm in an fMRI study, in which subjects viewed neutral and emotional words, which they were instructed to remember or to forget...
February 28, 2018: Scientific Reports
Jan-Willem Thielen, Donghyun Hong, Seyedmorteza Rohani Rankouhi, Jens Wiltfang, Guillén Fernández, David G Norris, Indira Tendolkar
The classical model of the declarative memory system describes the hippocampus and its interactions with representational brain areas in posterior neocortex as being essential for the formation of long-term episodic memories. However, new evidence suggests an extension of this classical model by assigning the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) a specific, yet not fully defined role in episodic memory. In this study, we utilized 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analysis to lend further support for the idea of a mnemonic role of the mPFC in humans...
February 27, 2018: Human Brain Mapping
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"