Read by QxMD icon Read

physical therapy tendon

Cynthia A Kahlenberg, David M Dare, Joshua S Dines
Kukkonen et al.'s "Treatment of Nontraumatic Rotator Cuff Tears: A Randomized Controlled Trial with Two Years of Clinical and Imaging Follow-up" compared the efficacy of physical therapy, acromioplasty, and rotator cuff repair for the treatment of degenerative supraspinatus tendon tears in patients aged over 55. This review examines the authors' findings and their implications on clinical practice. Kukkonen et al. reported no significant difference in clinical outcome among patients treated operatively versus non-operatively for degenerative rotator cuff tears...
October 2016: HSS Journal: the Musculoskeletal Journal of Hospital for Special Surgery
S E Varitimidis, Z H Dailiana, D Christou, K Grafanaki, M G Ioannou, C Stathopoulos, K N Malizos
This study investigates the histological background of torn rotator cuff tendons, evaluates the stability of newly synthesized collagen by measuring the hydro-xyproline content and attempts to correlate these findings with the clinical outcome after reconstruction of the rotator cuff. Sixty-one patients underwent reconstruction for a -rotator cuff tear. They were evaluated preoperatively with the Constant-Murley score, MRI and ultrasound. Biopsy samples were taken from chronic rotator cuff tears and histological analysis was performed...
August 2016: Acta Orthopaedica Belgica
Sherman O Canapp, Debra A Canapp, Victor Ibrahim, Brittany Jean Carr, Catherine Cox, Jennifer G Barrett
OBJECTIVE: To report clinical findings and outcomes for 55 dogs with supraspinatus tendinopathy (ST) treated with adipose-derived progenitor cells and platelet-rich plasma (ADPC-PRP) therapy. METHODS: Medical records of client-owned dogs diagnosed with ST that were treated with ADPC-PRP combination therapy were reviewed from 2006 to 2013. Data collected included signalment, medical history, limb involvement, prior treatments, physical and orthopedic examination, objective temporospatial gait analysis findings, diagnostic imaging results (radiography, magnetic resonance imaging, musculoskeletal ultrasonography), arthroscopy findings, and outcome...
2016: Frontiers in Veterinary Science
Mohammad Taufik Bin Mohamed Shah, Bak Siew Steven Wong
A 30-year-old woman presented with a six-month history of left posterior heel pain. Physical examination revealed a tender, inflamed and indurated posterior heel with a visible bony prominence of the posterosuperior aspect of the calcaneus. Lateral ankle radiography showed a prominent left posterosuperior calcaneal tuberosity and thickening of the distal Achilles tendon outline. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated high-signal inflammatory fluid in the retrocalcaneal bursa, increased signal intensity and thickening of the Achilles tendon, and prominence of the posterior calcaneus tuberosity with reactive marrow oedema...
September 2016: Singapore Medical Journal
Matthew T Provencher, Hannah Kirby, Lucas S McDonald, Petar Golijanin, Daniel Gross, Kevin J Campbell, Lance LeClere, George Sanchez, Shawn Anthony, Anthony A Romeo
BACKGROUND: Pectoralis minor (PM) tightness has been linked to pain and dysfunction of the shoulder joint secondary to anterior tilt and internal rotation of the scapula, thus causing secondary impingement of the subacromial space. PURPOSE: To describe outcomes pertaining to nonoperative and operative treatment via surgical release of the PM tendon for pathologic PM tightness in an active population. STUDY DESIGN: Case series; Level of evidence, 4...
September 9, 2016: American Journal of Sports Medicine
Eric M Padegimas, David M Beck, David I Pedowitz
: The authors present a case of a previously healthy and athletic 17-year-old female who presented with a 3.5-year history of medial left ankle pain after sustaining an inversion injury while playing basketball. Prior to presentation, she had failed prior immobilization and physical therapy for a presumed ankles sprain. Physical examination revealed a dislocated posterior tibial tendon (PTT) that was temporarily reducible, but would spontaneously dislocate immediately after reduction...
September 7, 2016: Foot & Ankle Specialist
Sarah C Sorice, Barry Press, Arash Momeni
Composite upper extremity defects involving muscle-tendon units are amongst the most formidable reconstructive challenges and mandate functional restoration in addition to stable soft-tissue coverage. Here, the authors present a case of a composite defect involving the extensor muscle-tendon units of the forearm resulting from surgical resection of a recurrent Merkel cell cancer. Functional restoration was achieved via multiple tendon transfers followed by soft tissue coverage with a free anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap...
August 31, 2016: Microsurgery
Ahmed Shams, Mohamed El-Sayed, Osama Gamal, Waled Ewes
OBJECTIVE: Rotator cuff tears are one of the most common causes of chronic shoulder pain and disability. They significantly affect the quality of life. Reduced pain and improved function are the goals of conventional therapy, which includes relative rest, pain therapy, physical therapy, corticosteroid injections and surgical intervention. Tendons have a relative avascular nature; hence, their regenerative potential is limited. There is some clinical evidence that the application of autologous platelets may help to revascularize the area of injury in rotator cuff pathologies...
August 20, 2016: European Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery & Traumatology: Orthopédie Traumatologie
J F Rold, B A Rold
In brief: Osteitis pubis is a general term that has been used for several disorders of the pubic symphysis. Pubic stress symphysitis, a more specific term, refers to the painful, nonseptic, inflammatory condition that occurs in runners and other endurance athletes. Septic cases, adductor tendon avulsion injuries, and stress fractures of the pubic rami must be clearly differentiated from pubic stress symphysitis to avoid confusion and misdiagnosis. Pelvic roentgenograms, radionuclide bone scans, laboratory evaluation, and physical findings make differentiation possible...
June 1986: Physician and Sportsmedicine
Zachary Meyer, William M Ricci
Patellar and quadriceps tendon ruptures are relatively common injuries. Rupture of the knee extensor mechanism may occur because of a forceful eccentric contraction of the quadriceps against a resisted flexed knee, though atraumatic cases have also been described. Patients at higher than normal risk for knee extensor mechanism rupture include those with systemic co-morbidities, fluoroquinolone use, and chronic tendinopathy. Early operative treatment and mobilization of acute extensor mechanism ruptures has proven effective, and numerous techniques have been described...
August 2016: Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma
G Hertel, J Götz, J Grifka, J Willers
A superior life expectancy and an increased activity in the population result in an increase in degenerative diseases, such as Achilles tendon ruptures. The medical history and physical examinations are the methods of choice to diagnose Achilles tendon ruptures. Ultrasound and radiography represent reasonable extended diagnostic procedures. In order to decide on the medical indications for the therapy concept, the advantages and disadvantages of conservative and surgical treatment options have to be weighed up on an indivdual basis...
August 2016: Der Orthopäde
Christian N Anderson
Disorders of the iliopsoas can be a significant source of groin pain in the athletic population. Commonly described pathologic conditions include iliopsoas bursitis, tendonitis, impingement, and snapping. The first-line treatment for iliopsoas disorders is typically conservative, including activity modification, physical therapy, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and corticosteroid injections. Surgical treatment can be considered if the patient fails conservative measures and typically involves arthroscopic lengthening of the musculotendinous unit and treatment of concomitant intra-articular abnormality...
July 2016: Clinics in Sports Medicine
Ariel A Williams, Thomas S Stang, Jan Fritz, Derek F Papp
Calcific tendinitis is a relatively rare condition in which calcium is inappropriately deposited in tendons, resulting in a local inflammatory reaction that can cause severe symptoms in certain cases. The cause of this disease process is not completely understood, although repetitive microtrauma likely plays a role in its development. Although the disorder most often involves the rotator cuff, it can affect other structures throughout the body, such as the tendons about the ankle and hip-including the rectus femoris and gluteus maximus...
September 1, 2016: Orthopedics
Simone Cerciello, Silvio Rossi, Enrico Visonà, Katia Corona, Francesco Oliva
BACKGROUND: Vibration therapy (VT) has been proposed as an option to improve physical performance and reduce the negative effects of ageing on bone, muscles and tendons. Several discrepancies exist on the type of applications, frequency and magnitude. These differences reflex on the contradictory clinical results in literature. Aim of the present study is to carry on an exhaustive review to focus on technical options on the market, clinical applications in orthopaedic practice and expected outcomes...
January 2016: Muscles, Ligaments and Tendons Journal
Márcio Almeida Bezerra, Cybelle da Silva Nery, Patrícia Verçoza de Castro Silveira, Gabriel Nunes de Mesquita, Thainá de Gomes Figueiredo, Magno Felipe Holanda Barboza Inácio Teixeira, Silvia Regina Arruda de Moraes
BACKGROUND: the complications caused by diabetes increase fragility in the muscle-tendon system, resulting in degeneration and easier rupture. To avoid this issue, therapies that increase the metabolism of glucose by the body, with physical activity, have been used after the confirmation of diabetes. We evaluate the biomechanical behavior of the calcaneal tendon and the metabolic parameters in rats induced to experimental diabetes and submitted to pre- and post-induction exercise. METHODS: 54-male-Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: Control Group (CG), Swimming Group (SG), Diabetic Group (DG), and Diabetic Swimming Group (DSG)...
January 2016: Muscles, Ligaments and Tendons Journal
Tsung-Hsun Yang, Yu-Chi Huang, Yiu-Chung Lau, Lin-Yi Wang
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy (rESWT) and to determine the posttreatment common extensor tendon stiffness among patients with lateral epicondylosis. DESIGN: Thirty patients with lateral epicondylosis were randomly divided into experimental and control groups. Participants in the experimental group received rESWT plus physical therapy, and those in the control group received sham shock wave plus physical therapy for 3 weeks...
June 17, 2016: American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
N Serviat-Hung, W Carvajal-Veitía, M Medina-Sánchez, Y Gutiérrez-Jorge, A Croas-Fernández
BACKGROUND: Inflammatory and calcifying diseases of the soft tissues are disorders having significant economical and social repercussions. They can be treated with drugs or physical therapy, and if these fail, surgery used to be the last existing therapeutic step. In recent years, a non-surgical alternative is being used to treat them, the application of extracorporeal shock waves. This work aims to verify the capacity of this therapeutic technique to diminish pain and to define its application rules...
September 2015: Acta Ortopédica Mexicana
Marc A Childress, Blair A Becker
Cervical radiculopathy describes pain in one or both of the upper extremities, often in the setting of neck pain, secondary to compression or irritation of nerve roots in the cervical spine. It can be accompanied by motor, sensory, or reflex deficits and is most prevalent in persons 50 to 54 years of age. Cervical radiculopathy most often stems from degenerative disease in the cervical spine. The most common examination findings are painful neck movements and muscle spasm. Diminished deep tendon reflexes, particularly of the triceps, are the most common neurologic finding...
May 1, 2016: American Family Physician
Hannae Jo, Gowun Kim, Sora Baek, Hee-Won Park
We report a case of calcific tendinopathy of the gluteus medius initially misdiagnosed as a lumbar herniated intervertebral disc. It was successfully treated with barbotage under ultrasonographic guidance finally. A 56-year-old woman was referred to interventional pain clinic for right hip pain due to an L5-S1 disc herniation. Serial L5 and S1 spinal nerve root blocks and epidural steroid injections were administered. However, pain relief was sustained only for a very short period. Plain radiography of the right hip revealed a solid calcific nodule at adjacent to the insertion site of the gluteus medius tendon...
April 2016: Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine
Rebecca Mellor, Alison Grimaldi, Henry Wajswelner, Paul Hodges, J Haxby Abbott, Kim Bennell, Bill Vicenzino
BACKGROUND: Lateral hip pain is common, particularly in females aged 40-60 years. The pain can affect sleep and daily activities, and is frequently recalcitrant. The condition is often diagnosed as trochanteric bursitis, however radiological and surgical studies have revealed that the most common pathology is gluteus medius/minimus tendinopathy. Patients are usually offered three treatment options: (a) corticosteroid injection (CSI), (b) physiotherapy, or (c) reassurance and observation...
2016: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"