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effect of angiotensin 2 on the kidneys

Min Shi, Liang Ma, Li Zhou, Ping Fu
Aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN) is a progressive kidney disease caused by a Chinese herb containing aristolochic acid. Excessive death of renal tubular epithelial cells (RTECs) characterized the acute phase of AAN. Therapies for acute AAN were limited, such as steroids and angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARBs)/angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs). It was interesting that, in acute AAN, female patients showed relative slower progression to renal failure than males. In a previous study, female hormone 17β-estradiol (E2) was found to attenuate renal ischemia-reperfusion injury...
October 18, 2016: Molecules: a Journal of Synthetic Chemistry and Natural Product Chemistry
Petra Rust, Cem Ekmekcioglu
Excessive dietary salt (sodium chloride) intake is associated with an increased risk for hypertension, which in turn is especially a major risk factor for stroke and other cardiovascular pathologies, but also kidney diseases. Besides, high salt intake or preference for salty food is discussed to be positive associated with stomach cancer, and according to recent studies probably also obesity risk. On the other hand a reduction of dietary salt intake leads to a considerable reduction in blood pressure, especially in hypertensive patients but to a lesser extent also in normotensives as several meta-analyses of interventional studies have shown...
October 19, 2016: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
James Scholey
The classical view of the RAS is a linear signaling pathway beginning with the conversion of angiotensinogen to ANG I by renin, an enzyme secreted by the kidney. ANG I is converted to ANG II by angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) ANG II binds to the G-protein coupled angiotensin II receptor type 1. The RAS is a circulating system but we now know that the RAS is also locally expressed in a number of tissues, including the kidneys and the heart. ANG II exerts adverse hemodynamic and non-hemodynamic effects on renal cells...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Zhiming Zhu
Management of hypertension in diabetes is critical for reducing cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Dietary approaches for controlling high blood pressure have historically focused on sodium. Thus, many guidelines recommend that patients with type 2 diabetes reduce high sodium intake. Nonetheless, the potential benefits of sodium reduction are debatable. The kidney has a crucial role in glucose filtration and reabsorption in addition to its regulation of fluid and electrolyte homeostasis. A key factor linking sodium uptake and glucose transport is the sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) in renal proximal tubular cells...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
David Harrison
Hypertension remains an enormous health care burden that affects one third of the population. Despite its prevalence the cause of most cases of hypertension remains unknown. Our laboratory has defined a novel mechanism for hypertension involving adaptive immunity. We found that mice lacking lymphocytes (RAG-1 mice) develop blunted hypertensive responses to a variety of stimuli including chronic angiotensin II infusion, DOCA-salt challenge and norepinephrine infusion. Adoptive transfer of T cells, but not B cells, restores the hypertensive responses to these stimuli...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Toshifumi Yamauchi, Masaki Mogi, Hirotomo Nakaoka, Kana Tsukuda, Masanori Kukida, Akinori Higaki, Hui-Yu Bai, Bao-Shuai Shan, Li-Juan Min, Jun Iwanami, Masatugu Horiuchi
OBJECTIVE: Fetal growth restriction (FGR) is one of the risks of cardiovascular problems in adulthood. We previously reported that the vascular injury enhanced vascular remodeling in FGR mice, but the mechanisms are still unclear. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) is relatively highly expressed in fetal mice but not in adult mice. Therefore, we investigated the effects of AT2R in FGR mice, using AT2R knockout (AT2KO) mice. DESIGN AND METHOD: Dams (C57BL/6J strain (WT) mice and AT2KO mice) were fed an isocaloric diet containing 20% protein (normal protein; NP) or 8% protein (low protein; LP) from 10 weeks of age until delivery...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Daniel W Jones
Hypertension and Chronic Kidney Disease are both common. The vast majority of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have hypertension. Hypertension can be both a cause and a result of CKD. Many patients with CKD, both diabetic and non-diabetic have overt proteinuria (>300 mg/day). Patients with proteinuria are at higher risk for progression of kidney disease and for atherosclerosis. Because patients with CKD are often excluded from hypertension trials with hard outcomes, there has been until recently less data than ideal to consider in making decisions...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Lin Shi
According to the seventh report of Joint National Committee (JNC 7), hypertensive emergency (HE), a kind of hypertensive crisis, is defined as a sudden and abrupt elevation in blood pressure so as to cause acute target organ dysfunctions, including central nervous system, cardiovascular system or kidneys. Patients with HE require immediate reduction in markedly elevated blood pressure. Currently, there are no international guidelines for children HE, so the JNC definition is commonly used. Hypertensive emergency in children is rare but a life-threatening emergency...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Shokei Kim-Mitsuyama
There is accumulating evidence that RAS inhibitors not only reduce blood pressure, but also exert pleiotropic effects, including a renoprotective effect, amelioration of insulin resistance, reduction in onset of diabetes, and suppression of cardiovascular remodelling,. However, the definite benefit of RAS inhibition in treatment of hypertension with CKD or DM is not conclusive. We previously performed the OlmeSartan and Calcium Antagonists Randomized (OSCAR) study comparing the preventive effect of high-dose ARB therapy versus ARB plus CCB combination therapy on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in 1164 Japanese elderly hypertensive patients with baseline type 2 diabetes and/or CVD (Am J Med (2012))...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Suzanne Oparil
Heart disease, stroke, and kidney failure are leading causes of death worldwide, and hypertension is a significant risk factor for each. Hypertension is less common in women, compared to men, in those younger than 45 years of age. This trend is reversed in those 65 years and older. In the US between 2011-2014, the prevalence of hypertension in women and men by age group was 6% vs 8% (18-39 years), 30% vs 35% (40-59 years), and 67% vs 63% (60 years and over). Awareness, treatment, and control rates differ between genders with women being more aware of their diagnosis (85% vs 80%), more likely to take their medications (81% vs 71%) and more frequently having controlled hypertension (55% vs 49%)...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Matthew Weir, George L Bakris, Coleman Gross, Martha R Mayo, Dahlia Garza, Jinwei Yuan, Lance Berman, Gordon H Williams
OBJECTIVE: Elevated serum aldosterone can be vasculotoxic and facilitates cardiorenal damage. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone inhibitors (RAASi) reduce serum aldosterone levels and/or block its effects but can cause hyperkalemia (HK). Patiromer, a nonabsorbed potassium binder, decreases serum potassium (K) in CKD patients on RAASi. We examined the effect of patiromer on serum aldosterone levels, plasma renin activity (PRA), systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) in CKD patients on RAASi with HK (serum K 5...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
David John Webb
Treatment-resistant hypertension (TRH) is defined as the failure to achieve an office BP target of <140/90 mmHg (<130/80 mmHg in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) or diabetes) in patients with hypertension (HT), despite adherence to at least 3 antihypertensive medications at optimal tolerated doses, ideally including a diuretic (Calhoun et al., Circulation 2008). TRH identifies patients with hard-to-treat HT, who might benefit from specialist investigation and treatment. Although some studies put the prevalence of TRH as >10%, these levels may be inflated by white-coat hypertension and poor adherence...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Alberto Zanchetti
The question of BP targets of antihypertensive treatment has been debated in recent guidelines, and reopened by publication of SPRINT. Although interpretation of SPRINT is made difficult by a preferential effect of more intense BP lowering on heart failure rather than stroke and myocardial infarction, and by a different method of BP measurement, recent meta-analyses by my group have shown SBP reduction <130 mmHg can reduce risk of cardiovascular (CV) outcomes further, but absolute benefit is smaller than that achieved across the 140 mmHg cutoff, and treatment discontinuations for adverse events become greater...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Yuhei Kawano
The relationship between salt and hypertension is well established, and salt restriction is widely recommended in the management of hypertension. However, people living in northeast Asia have consumed large amount of salt, and the prevalence of hypertension and the incidence of stroke have been high in that area. Mechanisms of salt-induced hypertension may be complex, but volume expansion in the presence of impaired natriuretic capacity of the kidney and action on the central nervous system and neurohormoral pathways seem to be important...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Vasilios Tsimihodimos, Theodosios D Filippatos, Sebastian Fillippas-Ntekouan, Moses S Elisaf
Sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors (SGLT-2) inhibitors) represent a new class of antidiabetic drugs that act through the inhibition of glucose and sodium reabsorption at proximal tubules. It has been shown that tThese substances may exhibit renonephroprotective properties, since they expressed clinically as a prevention of the deterioration of the glomerular filtration rate and a reductionreduce in the degree of albuminuria in patients with established diabetes-associated kidney disease. In this review we present in detail the pathophysiologic mechanisms that have been recently implicated in the rennephroprotective properties of SGLT-2 inhibitors...
October 7, 2016: Current Vascular Pharmacology
Guang-Tong Chen, Min Yang, Bing-Bing Chen, Yan Song, Wei Zhang, Yan Zhang
2,3,5,4'-Tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-d-glucoside (TSG), an active component from the functional and medicinal herb Polygonum multiflorum Thunb, has the capacity of blocking angiotensin II (ANG II) signaling, a pathway within the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) which plays a critical role in the development of diabetic nephropathy (DN), and blockade of the RAS is currently used for the treatment of DN. Here we investigated the beneficial effect of TSG therapy on renal damage in the streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes model...
October 17, 2016: Food & Function
You-Lin Tain, Wei-Chia Lee, Kay L H Wu, Steve Leu, Julie Y H Chan
Hypertension can be programmed in response to nutritional insults in early life. Maternal high-fructose (HF) intake induced programmed hypertension in adult male offspring, which is associated with renal programming and arachidonic acid metabolism pathway. We examined whether early treatment with a soluble epoxide hydrolase (SEH) inhibitor, 12-(3-adamantan-1-yl-ureido)-dodecanoic acid (AUDA) or 15-Deoxy-Δ(12,14)-prostagandin J2 (15dPGJ2) can prevent HF-induced programmed hypertension. Pregnant Sprague Dawley rats received regular chow or chow supplemented with fructose (60% diet by weight) during the whole period of pregnancy and lactation...
September 7, 2016: Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry
Yimin Yao, Gerard Davis, Joanne C Harrison, Robert J Walker, Ivan A Sammut
Renal innervation operates in conjunction with the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) to control tubular reabsorption of sodium and water. This relationship remains unexplored in diabetic nephropathy. This study investigates the effects of acute RAS inhibition and chronic renal denervation on renal function in diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced in mRen-2 rats prior to conducting chronic bilateral denervation in diabetic and normoglycaemic animals. At 12-weeks post-diabetic induction, renal haemodynamics and tubular handling of sodium and water were measured before and after acute captopril infusion...
October 3, 2016: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic & Clinical
Elisabeth M Hodson, Sophia C Wong, Narelle S Willis, Jonathan C Craig
BACKGROUND: The majority of children who present with their first episode of nephrotic syndrome achieve remission with corticosteroid therapy. Children who fail to respond may be treated with immunosuppressive agents including calcineurin inhibitors (cyclosporin or tacrolimus) and with non-immunosuppressive agents such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi). Optimal combinations of these agents with the least toxicity remain to be determined. This is an update of a review first published in 2004 and updated in 2006 and 2010...
October 11, 2016: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Fatemeh Moslemi, Pegah Taheri, Mahdis Azimipoor, Sina Ramtin, Mostafa Hashemianfar, Ali Momeni-Ashjerdi, Fatemeh Eshraghi-Jazi, Ardeshir Talebi, Hamid Nasri, Mehdi Nematbakhsh
BACKGROUND: Renal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury may be related to activity of reninangiotensin system (RAS), which is gender-related. In this study, it was attempted to compare the effect of angiotensin II (Ang II) receptor type 1 (AT1R) blockade; losartan in I/R injury in male and female rats. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Male and female Wistar rats were assigned as sham surgery, control I/R groups treated with vehicle, and case I/R groups treated with losartan (30 mg/kg)...
2016: Journal of Renal Injury Prevention
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