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Opioid constipation

Dong-Liang Chen, Yu-Hong Li, Zhi-Juan Wang, Ye-Ke Zhu
Gabapentin has been used as an adjuvant for treatment of cancer pain. Previous studies showed that opioids combined with gabapentin for management of cancer pain reduced the dosage of opioids.The objective of this study was to explore the clinical effect and patients' satisfaction of oxycontin combined with gabapentin in treatment of severe cancer pain. After titration of morphine, 60 severe cancer patients with visual analog score (VAS) more than 7 were randomly divided into trial group (n = 30) and control group (n = 30)...
October 2016: Medicine (Baltimore)
Katherine Clark, Lawrence T Lam, Nicholas J Talley, Jane L Phillips, David C Currow
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this work was to investigate whether variables identified as likely to impact the experience of constipation in other clinical settings similarly affected the experiences of constipated palliative care patients. BACKGROUND: The majority of palliative care patients with cancer are likely to be bothered by constipation symptoms at some point in their disease trajectory. Despite this, it remains unclear as to which factors predict more severe problems...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Palliative Medicine
Hiromitsu Kumada, Hiroshi Miyakawa, Taro Muramatsu, Naoki Ando, Takanori Oh, Kenji Takamori, Hidetomo Nakamoto
AIMS: Patients with chronic liver disease sometimes develop cholestasis, which induces severe whole-body pruritus that may disrupt daily activities and sleep. To determine the efficacy of nalfurafine hydrochloride (5 µg), which is a selective κ-opioid receptor agonist, in improving pruritus, we conducted a double-blind placebo-controlled study in patients with chronic liver disease with refractory pruritus. Nalfurafine hydrochloride at 2.5 µg was also used to evaluate the dose-response relationship...
October 18, 2016: Hepatology Research: the Official Journal of the Japan Society of Hepatology
Maria Jenelyn M Alviar, Tom Hale, Monalisa Dungca
BACKGROUND: This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 12, 2011. Phantom limb pain (PLP) is pain that arises in the missing limb after amputation and can be severe, intractable, and disabling. Various medications have been studied in the treatment of phantom pain. There is currently uncertainty in the optimal pharmacologic management of PLP. OBJECTIVES: This review aimed to summarise the evidence of effectiveness of pharmacologic interventions in treating PLP...
October 14, 2016: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Yan J Bao, Wei Hou, Xiang Y Kong, Liping Yang, Jun Xia, Bao J Hua, Roger Knaggs
BACKGROUND: Cancer pain is an important and distressing symptom that tends to increase in frequency and intensity as the cancer advances. For people with advanced cancer, the prevalence of pain can be as high as 90%. It has been estimated that 30% to 50% of people with cancer categorise their pain as moderate to severe, with between 75% and 90% of people with cancer experiencing pain that they describe as having a major impact on their daily life. Epidemiological studies suggest that approximately 15% of people with cancer pain fail to experience acceptable pain relief with conventional management...
October 11, 2016: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Sheena Derry, Cathy Stannard, Peter Cole, Philip J Wiffen, Roger Knaggs, Dominic Aldington, R Andrew Moore
BACKGROUND: Opioid drugs, including fentanyl, are commonly used to treat neuropathic pain, and are considered effective by some professionals. Most reviews have examined all opioids together. This review sought evidence specifically for fentanyl, at any dose, and by any route of administration. Other opioids are considered in separate reviews. OBJECTIVES: To assess the analgesic efficacy of fentanyl for chronic neuropathic pain in adults, and the adverse events associated with its use in clinical trials...
October 11, 2016: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Ioannis A Dimitroulis, Panagiota Stamou, Adamantia Liapikou, Michail Toumbis
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2016: Journal of Thoracic Oncology
Richard Lawson, James Ryan, Frederic King, Jo Wern Goh, Eszter Tichy, Kevin Marsh
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) is the most common adverse effect reported in patients receiving opioids to manage pain. Initial treatment with laxatives provides inadequate response in some patients. Naloxegol is a peripherally acting µ-opioid receptor antagonist used to treat patients with inadequate response to laxative(s) (laxative inadequate responder [LIR]). A cost-effectiveness model was constructed from the UK payer perspective to compare oral naloxegol 25 mg with placebo in non-cancer LIR patients receiving opioids for chronic pain, and a scenario analysis of naloxegol 25 mg with rescue laxatives compared with placebo with rescue laxatives in the same patient population...
September 23, 2016: PharmacoEconomics
Denys T Lau, Lisa L Dwyer, Joseph W Shega
OBJECTIVES: To examine laxative use by individuals in hospice who were taking opioids during the last week of life. DESIGN: Retrospective cross-sectional. SETTING: 2007 National Home and Hospice Care Survey. PARTICIPANTS: Individuals in hospice aged 65 and older who were taking opioids during the last week of life (N = 2,825). MEASUREMENTS: Hospice staff were asked the names of all medications and drugs that participants were taking 7 days before and on the day of death while in hospice, including any standing, routine, or as-needed medications...
September 19, 2016: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
P Cuny, M Houot, S Ginisty, S Horowicz, F Plassart, H Mentec, P Eftekhari
INTRODUCTION: The aim of this paper is to underline the need for systematic monitoring of patients treated with anticholinergic antipsychotic drugs. We present the clinical history of a 34-year-old adult, treated with quetiapine in combination with other drugs with anticholinergic effects. CASE REPORT: A 34-year-old male adult had been suffering from bipolar disorder since 2001. He was treated with risperidone, but he was not compliant due to adverse effects, including decreased libido and erectile dysfunction...
September 13, 2016: L'Encéphale
Masanori Mori, Yongli Ji, Santosh Kumar, Takamaru Ashikaga, Steven Ades
BACKGROUND: Methylnaltrexone is a peripherally acting mu-opioid receptor antagonist that has been shown to relieve severe opioid-induced constipation (OIC) in patients with advanced disease receiving palliative care. Its efficacy remains unknown in cancer patients who are not terminally ill. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of methylnaltrexone over 48 h in cancer patients who were not terminally ill. METHODS: In this single-dose phase II trial, cancer patients with a prognosis of ≥3 months and OIC with <3 laxations during the preceding week were eligible...
September 15, 2016: International Journal of Clinical Oncology
Gian Maria Pacifici
Morphine is an agonist of the µ and k receptors, whose activation results in analgesia. Morphine-like agonists act through the µ opioid receptors to cause pain relief, sedation, euphoria and respiratory depression. Morphine is glucuronidated and sulfated at positions 3 and 6; the plasma concentration ratios correlate positively with birth weight, which probably reflects increased liver weight with increasing birth weight. Moreover, morphine clearance correlates positively with gestational age and birth weight...
August 2016: Clinics
Ancilla W Fernandes, David M Kern, Catherine Datto, Yen-Wen Chen, Charles McLeskey, Ozgur Tunceli
BACKGROUND: Opioids are widely accepted as treatment for moderate to severe pain, and opioid-induced constipation is one of the most common side effects of opioids. This side effect negatively affects pain management and patients' quality of life, which could result in increased healthcare utilization and costs. OBJECTIVE: To assess healthcare utilization and costs (all-cause, constipation-related, and pain-related) for individuals with and without opioid-induced constipation during the 12 months after initiation of opioid therapy for noncancer pain...
May 2016: American Health & Drug Benefits
Fabio Lugoboni, Antonio Mirijello, Chiara Resentera, Lorenzo Zamboni, Marco Faccini, Rebecca Casari, Anthony Cossari, Gessica Musi, Giorgia Bissoli, Antonio Gasbarrini, Gianluca Quaglio, Giovanni Addolorato
OBJECTIVES: To evaluate prevalence and severity of constipation and quality of life (QoL) in a cohort of opioid-addicted patients treated with opioid substitution treatments. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Multicenter observational study. A total of 1057 heroin-dependent patients treated with methadone or buprenorphine were enrolled. Constipation was assessed by Wexner Constipation Scoring System, QoL by General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). RESULTS: 38...
September 7, 2016: Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy
Wojciech Leppert, Jaroslaw Woron
Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) and other gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction (OIBD) significantly deteriorate patients' quality of life and may lead to noncompliance with opioid schedule and undertreatment of pain. Although traditional oral laxatives are the first-line treatment of OIC, they do not address OIBD pathophysiology, and display numerous adverse effects. OIC treatment includes prokinetics (lubiprostone), opioid switch, and changing route of opioid administration...
September 2016: Therapeutic Advances in Gastroenterology
F Janku, L K Johnson, D D Karp, J T Atkins, P A Singleton, J Moss
BACKGROUND: Methylnaltrexone (MNTX), a peripherally acting μ-opioid receptor (MOR) antagonist, is FDA-approved for treatment of opioid-induced constipation (OIC). Preclinical data suggest that MOR activation can play a role in cancer progression and can be a target for anticancer therapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Pooled data from advanced end-stage cancer patients with OIC, despite laxatives, treated in two randomized (phase III and IV), placebo-controlled trials with MNTX were analyzed for overall survival (OS) in an unplanned post hoc analysis...
August 29, 2016: Annals of Oncology: Official Journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology
András Váradi, Gina F Marrone, Travis C Palmer, Ankita Narayan, Márton R Szabó, Valerie Le Rouzic, Steven G Grinnell, Joan J Subrath, Evelyn Warner, Sanjay Kalra, Amanda Hunkele, Jeremy Pagirsky, Shainnel O Eans, Jessica M Medina, Jin Xu, Ying-Xian Pan, Attila Borics, Gavril W Pasternak, Jay P McLaughlin, Susruta Majumdar
Natural products found in Mitragyna speciosa, commonly known as kratom, represent diverse scaffolds (indole, indolenine, and spiro pseudoindoxyl) with opioid activity, providing opportunities to better understand opioid pharmacology. Herein, we report the pharmacology and SAR studies both in vitro and in vivo of mitragynine pseudoindoxyl (3), an oxidative rearrangement product of the corynanthe alkaloid mitragynine. 3 and its corresponding corynantheidine analogs show promise as potent analgesics with a mechanism of action that includes mu opioid receptor agonism/delta opioid receptor antagonism...
September 22, 2016: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry
Johannes Oppermann, Jan Bredow, Christian K Spies, Julia Lemken, Frank Unglaub, Christoph K Boese, Jens Dargel, Peer Eysel, Jan Zöllner
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of postoperative prolonged release oxycodone/naloxone (OXN) in comparison to other opioids (control group) on the early postoperative rehabilitation outcome after total knee replacement. METHODS: In a prospective, noninterventional, nonrandomized clinical trial, 80 patients were assigned to either the OXN group or a control group. Postoperative outcome and pain level at days 3, 6, 21, 35, and 6months were evaluated using the Bowel Function Index, Brief Pain Inventory Short Form questionnaire, the Hospital for Special Surgery score, modified Larson score, and the ability to attend physiotherapy...
September 2016: Journal of Clinical Anesthesia
Lene Jarlbæk, Berit Johnsen, Ole Bo Hansen, Birte Hedal
The evidence for treatment of constipation in palliative care patients is poor. The condition of these patients is often complex, and results from studies performed in other patient groups cannot be extrapolated unconditionally. However, macrogol (polyethylene glycol), lactulose and sodium picosulphate seem to be well tolerated, and methylnaltrexone could be used in opioid-induced constipation, if the patients are not at risk from gastrointestinal perforation. The patients should be offered quiet and private surroundings, and attention should be payed to securing an optimal body position for defecation...
August 15, 2016: Ugeskrift for Laeger
Stefan Wirz, Steffen Simon, Thomas Frieling, Claudia Bausewein, Raymond Voltz, Anne Pralong, Stefan Mönig, Markus Follmann, Martin Holtmann, Gerhild Becker
According to the German S3-guideline 'Palliative Medicine' which has been supported by the German Guideline Program in Oncology, constipation in palliative patients requires a consistent prophylaxis and therapy. Constipation is caused by immobilisation, poor health, exsiccosis, a low-fiber diet or a preexisting functional constipation. Further important causes are substances with constipating side effects, such as opioids or anticholinergic drugs. Pragmatically, constipation should be assessed by subjective parameters such as the feeling of incomplete evacuation, straining, or other complaints...
August 2016: Deutsche Medizinische Wochenschrift
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