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pneumothorax peep

Lingchen Kong, Jianzhong Li, Peng Wu, Jianhua Xu, Honglei Li, Haifei Long, Pan Liu, Fangfang Wei, Wenhong Peng
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the curative effect of lateral position ventilation combined with vibration sputum drainage on the patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). METHODS: A prospective randomized controlled trial was conducted. The patients with ARDS undergoing mechanical ventilation (MV) admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) of Linyi Central Hospital from January 2013 to June 2017 were enrolled, and they were divided into simple ventilation group and combined treatment group according to random number table...
March 2018: Zhonghua Wei Zhong Bing Ji Jiu Yi Xue
Beatriz Lobo, Cecilia Hermosa, Ana Abella, Federico Gordo
Continuous assessment of respiratory status is one of the cornerstones of modern intensive care unit (ICU) monitoring systems. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT), although with some constraints, may play the lead as a new diagnostic and guiding tool for an adequate optimization of mechanical ventilation in critically ill patients. EIT may assist in defining mechanical ventilation settings, assess distribution of tidal volume and of end-expiratory lung volume (EELV) and contribute to titrate positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP)/tidal volume combinations...
January 2018: Annals of Translational Medicine
Ratchada Kitsommart, Kittaya Nakornchai, Buranee Yangthara, Ratchada Jiraprasertwong, Bosco Paes
BACKGROUND: There is limited evidence of the effect of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) during resuscitation soon after birth. Premature neonates may experience respiratory distress from surfactant insufficiency and providing PEEP after the very first breath, may improve outcomes following appropriate resuscitation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the short term respiratory outcomes after positive pressure ventilation (PPV) with PEEP in preterm infants at birth. METHODS: A prospective randomized-controlled, pilot trial was conducted...
December 9, 2017: Pediatrics and Neonatology
Lee S Nguyen, Messaouda Merzoug, Philippe Estagnasie, Alain Brusset, Jean-Dominique Law Koune, Stephane Aubert, Thierry Waldmann, Jean-Michel Grinda, Hadrien Gibert, Pierre Squara
BACKGROUND: Postoperative pulmonary complications are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality after cardiac surgery. There are no recommendations on mechanical ventilation associated with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) during surgery and anesthesiologists perform either no ventilation (noV) at all during CPB or maintain low tidal volume (LTV) ventilation. Indirect evidence points towards better pulmonary outcomes when LTV is performed but no large-scale prospective trial has yet been published in cardiac surgery...
December 2, 2017: Trials
Alexandre Biasi Cavalcanti, Érica Aranha Suzumura, Ligia Nasi Laranjeira, Denise de Moraes Paisani, Lucas Petri Damiani, Helio Penna Guimarães, Edson Renato Romano, Marisa de Moraes Regenga, Luzia Noriko Takahashi Taniguchi, Cassiano Teixeira, Roselaine Pinheiro de Oliveira, Flavia Ribeiro Machado, Fredi Alexander Diaz-Quijano, Meton Soares de Alencar Filho, Israel Silva Maia, Eliana Bernardete Caser, Wilson de Oliveira Filho, Marcos de Carvalho Borges, Priscilla de Aquino Martins, Mirna Matsui, Gustavo Adolfo Ospina-Tascón, Thiago Simões Giancursi, Nelson Dario Giraldo-Ramirez, Silvia Regina Rios Vieira, Maria da Graça Pasquotto de Lima Assef, Mohd Shahnaz Hasan, Wojciech Szczeklik, Fernando Rios, Marcelo Britto Passos Amato, Otávio Berwanger, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro de Carvalho
Importance: The effects of recruitment maneuvers and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) titration on clinical outcomes in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remain uncertain. Objective: To determine if lung recruitment associated with PEEP titration according to the best respiratory-system compliance decreases 28-day mortality of patients with moderate to severe ARDS compared with a conventional low-PEEP strategy. Design, Setting, and Participants: Multicenter, randomized trial conducted at 120 intensive care units (ICUs) from 9 countries from November 17, 2011, through April 25, 2017, enrolling adults with moderate to severe ARDS...
October 10, 2017: JAMA: the Journal of the American Medical Association
Florian Schmid, Dirk Manfred Olbertz, Manfred Ballmann
BACKGROUND: High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC)1 is a technique of oxygen supply, initially being used as a potentially less-invasive alternative to nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP)2 for premature infants/neonates, which nowadays crosses the border of neonatal care. HFNC builds up a positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP)3 but lacks the opportunity for continuous monitoring. Therefore, pressure-depending complications are a risk. Our goal was to evaluate the current use of HFNC in Germany regarding indications, techniques of application and complications experienced...
October 2017: Respiratory Medicine
Toru Kotani, Shinshu Katayama, Yuya Miyazaki, Satoshi Fukuda, Yoko Sato, Koichi Ohsugi
BACKGROUND: The risk factors for the mortality rate of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) who required mechanical ventilation (MV) remained unknown. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was performed of all PCP patients admitted to our intensive care unit and treated for acute hypoxemic respiratory failure to assess the risk factors for the high mortality. RESULTS: Twenty patients without human immunodeficiency virus infection required mechanical ventilation; 19 received noninvasive ventilation; and 11 were intubated...
2017: BioMed Research International
Amanda Corley, Claire M Rickard, Leanne M Aitken, Amy Johnston, Adrian Barnett, John F Fraser, Sharon R Lewis, Andrew F Smith
BACKGROUND: High-flow nasal cannulae (HFNC) deliver high flows of blended humidified air and oxygen via wide-bore nasal cannulae and may be useful in providing respiratory support for adult patients experiencing acute respiratory failure in the intensive care unit (ICU). OBJECTIVES: We evaluated studies that included participants 16 years of age and older who were admitted to the ICU and required treatment with HFNC. We assessed the safety and efficacy of HFNC compared with comparator interventions in terms of treatment failure, mortality, adverse events, duration of respiratory support, hospital and ICU length of stay, respiratory effects, patient-reported outcomes, and costs of treatment...
May 30, 2017: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Patricio González-Pizarro, Javier García-Fernández, Susana Canfrán, Fernando Gilsanz
BACKGROUND: Causing pneumothorax is one of the main concerns of lung recruitment maneuvers in pediatric patients, especially newborns. Therefore, these maneuvers are not performed routinely during anesthesia. Our objective was to determine the pressures that cause pneumothorax in healthy newborns by a prospective experimental study of 10 newborn piglets (<48 h old) with healthy lungs under general anesthesia. METHODS: The primary outcome was peak inspiratory pressure (PIP) causing pneumothorax...
February 2016: Respiratory Care
Marco Giani, Vittorio Scaravilli, Sebastiano Maria Colombo, Andrea Confalonieri, Rosambra Leo, Elena Maggioni, Leonello Avalli, Alessia Vargiolu, Giuseppe Citerio
PURPOSE: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of an apnea test (AT) technique that combines the application of positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) with subsequent pulmonary recruitment in a large cohort of brain-dead patients. METHODS: This study was a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data on brain-dead patients admitted to our institution (Hospital San Gerardo, Monza, Italy) between January 2010 and December 2014. The rate of aborted apnea tests (ATs), occurrence of complications (i...
January 2016: Intensive Care Medicine
Sundeep R Bhat, David A Johnson, Jessica E Pierog, Brita E Zaia, Sarah R Williams, Laleh Gharahbaghian
INTRODUCTION: In the United States, there are limited studies regarding use of prehospital ultrasound (US) by emergency medical service (EMS) providers. Field diagnosis of life-threatening conditions using US could be of great utility. This study assesses the ability of EMS providers and students to accurately interpret heart and lung US images. METHODS: We tested certified emergency medical technicians (EMT-B) and paramedics (EMT-P) as well as EMT-B and EMT-P students enrolled in prehospital training programs within two California counties...
July 2015: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
Nissar Shaikh, Abdel Salam Saif, Mohammed Nayeemuddin, Ousama Kokash
Patent foramen ovale (PFO) is defined as a valve-like opening at the level of foramen ovale or between septum primum and secundum without evidence of the anatomical defect. Paradoxical embolism (PDE) is an embolus passing through a defect PFO leading to end-organ dysfunction. PDE in septic shock is not yet reported in the literature. A 49-year male presented to the emergency department with shortness of breath since one day and pain in the left side of the chest. Chest x0 -ray revealed middle-left lobe pneumonia with pleural effusion; he was started on Co-amoxiclav, and admitted to the ward...
January 2012: Anesthesia, Essays and Researches
John T Denny, Andrew Burr, James Tse, Julia E Denny, Darrick Chyu, Shaul Cohen, Arpit N Patel
Prompted by our experience with complications occurring with apnea testing (AT), we discuss complications reported in the literature. AT is an integral part of brain death assessment. Many complications of AT have been described, including hypoxemia, arterial hypotension, tension pneumothorax and cardiac arrest. We conclude that a commonly used technique in conducting AT can create auto-positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) and contributes to many complications. The mechanism of occult auto-PEEP in AT is discussed...
June 2015: Journal of Clinical Neuroscience: Official Journal of the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia
Linda E Sousse, David N Herndon, Clark R Andersen, Arham Ali, Nicole C Benjamin, Thomas Granchi, Oscar E Suman, Ronald P Mlcak
BACKGROUND: Inhalation injury, which is among the causes of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), continues to represent a significant source of mortality in burned patients. Inhalation injury often requires mechanical ventilation, but the ideal tidal volume strategy is not clearly defined in burned pediatric patients. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of low and high tidal volume on the number of ventilator days, ventilation pressures, and incidence of atelectasis, pneumonia, and ARDS in pediatric burned patients with inhalation injury within 1 year post burn injury...
April 2015: Journal of the American College of Surgeons
Satoshi Ideno, Eiki Hatori, Junzo Takeda, Hiroshi Morisaki
The Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is a rare set of disorders characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, bleeding diathesis, and pulmonary fibrosis, with the latter 2 conditions presenting major challenges in anesthetic management. We report a 53-year-old woman with pulmonary fibrosis secondary to HPS who underwent video-assisted bullectomy to treat recurrent pneumothorax. Preoperative bleeding time and platelet count were within normal limits, but the surgeons had difficulty with continuous oozing from the incision site; the surgical blood loss was 270 mL, which was a relatively large amount for this surgery...
May 2015: Journal of Clinical Anesthesia
Pierpaolo Terragni, Vito Marco Ranieri, Luca Brazzi
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To discuss the mechanisms of ventilator-induced lung injury and the pro and cons of the different approaches proposed by literature to minimize its impact in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. RECENT FINDINGS: Mechanical ventilation is indispensable to manage respiratory failure. The evolution of knowledge of the physiological principles and of the clinical implementation of mechanical ventilation is characterized by the shift of interest from its capability to restore 'normal gas exchange' to its capability of causing further lung damage and multisystem organ failure...
February 2015: Current Opinion in Critical Care
Walter James, Lisa Brath, Orlando Debesa
SESSION TITLE: Infectious Disease Cases IISESSION TYPE: Affiliate Case Report SlidePRESENTED ON: Wednesday, October 29, 2014 at 11:00 AM - 12:15 PMINTRODUCTION: Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is a disease with significant morbidity, mortality and cost. Pulmonary tuberculosis(TB) causing ARDS is rare. This case report describes a unique case of ARDS secondary to Pulmonary TB that was successfully managed with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). CASE PRESENTATION: A 31 year-old Liberian male was transferred with progressive respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation...
October 1, 2014: Chest
Canan Bor, Kubilay Demirağ, Mehmet Uyar, Ilkin Cankayalı, Ali Reşat Moral
The pregnant patients are prone to influenza A (H1N1) virus infection, which may rapidly progress to lower respiratory tract infection and subsequent respiratory failure and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Pneumothorax might develop in ARDS under mechanical ventilation. But post-ARDS pneumothorax in spontaneously breathing patient has not been reported in the literature. We report a 31-year old pregnant woman infected with influenza A (H1N1) virus and progressed to ARDS. Mechanical ventilation with high PEEP improved patient's gas exchange parameters within 3 weeks...
March 2013: Balkan Medical Journal
Benjamin Kasenda, Willi Sauerbrei, Patrick Royston, Matthias Briel
BACKGROUND: Categorizing an inherently continuous predictor in prognostic analyses raises several critical methodological issues: dependence of the statistical significance on the number and position of the chosen cut-point(s), loss of statistical power, and faulty interpretation of the results if a non-linear association is incorrectly assumed to be linear. This also applies to a therapeutic context where investigators of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) are interested in interactions between treatment assignment and one or more continuous predictors...
May 20, 2014: Systematic Reviews
Pritish Bawa, Kultida Soontarapornchai, Agnes Perenyi, Rachelle Goldfisher, John Amodio
Pulmonary interstitial emphysema (PIE) is not an uncommon finding in premature infants with respiratory distress who need respiratory support by mechanical ventilation. PIE has been reported in a few cases of neonates in whom either no treatment other than room air was given or they were given continuous positive end-expiratory pressure (CPAP) support. We present a case of a premature neonate who presented with respiratory distress, in whom PIE and spontaneous pneumothorax (PTX) developed while on CPAP therapy only...
2014: Case Reports in Pediatrics
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