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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28493011/mri-of-thoracic-outlet-syndrome-in-children
#1
REVIEW
Govind B Chavhan, Vaishnavi Batmanabane, Prakash Muthusami, Alexander J Towbin, Gregory H Borschel
Thoracic outlet syndrome is caused by compression of the neurovascular bundle as it passes from the upper thorax to the axilla. The neurovascular bundle can be compressed by bony structures such as the first rib, cervical ribs or bone tubercles, or from soft-tissue abnormalities like a fibrous band, muscle hypertrophy or space-occupying lesion. Thoracic outlet syndrome commonly affects young adults but can be seen in the pediatric age group, especially in older children. Diagnosis is based on a holistic approach encompassing clinical features, physical examination findings including those triggered by various maneuvers, electromyography, nerve conduction studies and imaging...
May 10, 2017: Pediatric Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28479443/post-operative-pain-management-following-thoracic-outlet-decompression
#2
Mathew Wooster, Dana Reed, Adam Tanious, Karl Illig
BACKGROUND: Thoracic outlet decompression (TOD) is associated with significant post operative pain often leading to hospital length of stay out of proportion to the risk profile of the operation. We seek to describe the improvement in hospital length of stay and patient pain control with an improved multi-agent pain management regimen. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the hospital length of stay, medication regimen/usage, operative details, and operative indications for all patients undergoing TOD from January 2012 through June 2015...
May 4, 2017: Annals of Vascular Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28427870/all-endoscopic-brachial-plexus-complete-neurolysis-for-idiopathic-neurogenic-thoracic-outlet-syndrome-a-prospective-case-series
#3
Thibault Lafosse, Malo Le Hanneur, Laurent Lafosse
PURPOSE: To describe an all-endoscopic technique for infra- and supraclavicular brachial plexus (BP) neurolysis and to assess its functional outcomes for patients suffering from nonspecific neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (NTOS). METHODS: Between January 2010 and January 2013, 36 patients presenting an idiopathic nonspecific NTOS benefited from an endoscopic decompression in our institution. The inclusion criteria were a typical clinical NTOS and failure of a 6-month well-conducted nonsurgical treatment...
April 17, 2017: Arthroscopy: the Journal of Arthroscopic & related Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28303559/-thoracic-outlet-syndrome
#4
Sven Seifert, Pavel Sebesta, Marian Klenske, Mirko Esche
Introduction Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is one of the most extensively discussed diagnoses. There is neither a clear and homogenous clinical presentation nor an accepted definition. The term describes a complex of symptoms and complaints caused by the compression of nerves and vascular structures at one of the three defined constrictions of the upper thoracic aperture. Methods Based on a comprehensive literature review, this article presents the etiology, epidemiology and clinical diagnostics as well as the possibilities and outcomes of surgical treatment...
February 2017: Zentralblatt Für Chirurgie
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28135679/an-unusual-case-of-neurogenic-thoracic-outlet-syndrome
#5
Yash Vaidya, Rajan Vaithianathan
INTRODUCTION: Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (nTOS) is the most common manifestation of thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS), accounting for more than 95% of cases. It is usually caused by cervical ribs, anomalies in the scalene muscle anatomy or post-traumatic inflammatory changes causing compression of the brachial plexus. CASE PRESENTATION: We present an unusual case of nTOS caused by a cystic lymphangioma at the thoracic outlet, with only one case reported previously in the literature...
2017: International Journal of Surgery Case Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28018833/aneurysmal-bone-cyst-arising-from-the-first-rib-a-rare-cause-of-thoracic-outlet-syndrome
#6
Manuel Medina, Subroto Paul
Aneurysmal bone cyst is a rare benign cystic bone lesion with an incidence of only 0.14 per 100,000 individuals and most commonly affects the metaphyses of long bones, spine, and pelvis. We present a very rare case of a 17-year-old boy with a rapidly expanding aneurysmal bone cyst arising from the first rib, resulting in neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome secondary to its compression of the brachial plexus. The patient's symptoms resolved after en bloc resection. To our knowledge there have been no other reports in the literature of thoracic outlet syndrome due to aneurysmal bone cyst arising from the first rib...
December 2016: Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgeon Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28006856/the-thoracic-outlet-syndromes-part-2-the-arterial-venous-neurovascular-and-disputed-thoracic-outlet-syndromes
#7
Mark A Ferrante, Nicole D Ferrante
The thoracic outlet syndromes (TOSs) are a group of etiologically and clinically distinct disorders with 1 feature in common: compression of 1 or more neurovascular elements as they traverse the thoracic outlet. The medical literature reflects 5 TOSs: arterial; venous; traumatic neurovascular; true neurogenic; and disputed. Of these, the first 4 demonstrate all of the features expected of a syndrome, whereas disputed TOS does not, causing many experts to doubt its existence altogether. Thus, some categorize disputed TOSs as cervicoscapular pain syndrome rather than as a type of TOS...
December 22, 2016: Muscle & Nerve
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28006844/the-thoracic-outlet-syndromes-part-1-overview-of-the-thoracic-outlet-syndromes-and-review-of-true-neurogenic-thoracic-outlet-syndrome
#8
Mark A Ferrante, Nicole D Ferrante
The thoracic outlet syndromes (TOSs) are a group of etiologically and clinically distinct disorders with 1 feature in common: compression of 1 or more neurovascular elements as they traverse the thoracic outlet. The medical literature reflects 5 TOSs: arterial; venous; traumatic neurovascular; true neurogenic; and disputed. Of these, the first 4 demonstrate all of the features expected of a syndrome, whereas disputed TOS does not, causing many experts to doubt its existence altogether. Thus, some categorize disputed TOS as a cervicoscapular pain syndrome rather than as a type of TOS...
December 22, 2016: Muscle & Nerve
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28002866/botulinum-toxin-injections-in-musculoskeletal-disorders
#9
Ivan R B Godoy, Dean M Donahue, Martin Torriani
Botulinum toxin (BTX) is used for multiple clinical indications due to its ability to induce temporary chemodenervation and muscle paralysis. This property has supported its application in treating a variety of musculoskeletal conditions, especially those involving muscular hyperactivity and contractures such as cerebral palsy and dystonia. However, off-label use of BTX injection in other musculoskeletal disorders is gaining increased acceptance, such as in neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome, epicondylitis, and shoulder pain after stroke...
November 2016: Seminars in Musculoskeletal Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27989967/modified-interscalene-approach-for-resection-of-symptomatic-cervical-rib-anatomic-review-and-clinical-study
#10
Walid Abdel Ghany, Mohamed A Nada, Ahmed F Toubar, Ahmed E Desoky, Hesham Ibrahim, Marwa A Nassef, Mostafa G Mahran
BACKGROUND: Cervical ribs have been reported to be present in about 0.5% of the general population, 10% of patients with cervical rib who are symptomatic usually have neurogenic symptoms, but some have arterial symptoms. In 1861, Coote was the first to excise a cervical rib through a supraclavicular approach and relieved the symptoms of thoracic outlet syndrome. OBJECTIVE: In this study, we address the efficacy and safety of a modification to the supraclavicular approach for resection of symptomatic cervical ribs...
February 2017: World Neurosurgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27987052/thoracic-outlet-syndrome-wide-literature-for-few-cases-status-of-the-art
#11
REVIEW
Pietro Emiliano Doneddu, Daniele Coraci, Paola De Franco, Ilaria Paolasso, Pietro Caliandro, Luca Padua
Despite its low prevalence and incidence, considerable debate exists in the literature on thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS). From literature analysis on nerve entrapments, we realized that TOS is the second most commonly published entrapment syndrome in the literature (after carpal tunnel syndrome) and that it is even more reported than ulnar neuropathy at elbow, which, instead, is very frequent. Despite the large amount of articles, there is still controversy regarding its classification, clinical picture, diagnostic objective findings, diagnostic modalities, therapeutical strategies and outcomes...
March 2017: Neurological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27979572/a-fourteen-year-experience-with-vascular-anomalies-encountered-during-transaxillary-rib-resection-for-thoracic-outlet-syndrome
#12
Jeniann A Yi, Robert J Johnston, Mark R Nehler, Douglas R Gibula, Kristen Alix, Natalia O Glebova, Charles O Brantigan
BACKGROUND: Transaxillary approach to first rib resection and scalenectomy (TAFRRS) is a well-established technique for treatment of thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS). Although anatomic features encountered during TAFRRS are in general constant, vascular anomalies may be encountered but have not been described to date. Herein we describe vascular abnormalities encountered during TAFRRS. METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of a prospective practice database of 224 operations for TOS performed in 172 patients from March 2000 to March 2014...
December 12, 2016: Annals of Vascular Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27740456/thoracic-outlet-syndromes-the-so-called-neurogenic-types
#13
J Laulan
Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is one of the most controversial pain syndromes of the upper limbs. The controversies revolve around both the diagnosis and treatment of the non-specific or subjective subtypes. Their diagnosis rests on a combination of history, suggestive symptoms and clinical examination. Proximal pain is primarily muscular in origin, while distal symptoms may be the result of intermittent nerve compression and/or myofascial pain syndrome. Stringent clinical criteria are required to confirm the diagnosis of subjective TOS...
June 2016: Hand Surgery and Rehabilitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27694556/thoracic-outlet-syndrome-affecting-high-performance-musicians-playing-bowed-string-instruments
#14
Christopher J Demaree, Kevin Wang, Peter H Lin
Thoracic outlet syndrome, a condition due to neurovascular compression in the upper shoulder region, can be caused by chronic repetitive activity of the upper extremities. Studies have linked upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders to high-performance musicians who play bowed string instruments such as the violin or viola. We report herein a case series of five elite musicians, including three violinists and two violaists, who developed neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome following years of intense practice...
June 2017: Vascular
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27666803/outcome-of-surgical-treatment-for-thoracic-outlet-syndrome-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#15
REVIEW
Jesse Peek, Cornelis G Vos, Çağdaş Ünlü, Henricus D W M van de Pavoordt, Peter J van den Akker, Jean-Paul P M de Vries
BACKGROUND: Many publications report outcomes of surgical treatment for thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS); however, high-quality reviews and meta-analyses are lacking. This systematic review and meta-analysis summarizes and compares the outcomes and major complications of the surgical procedures for the 3 types of TOS: arterial, venous, and neurogenic. METHODS: MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL databases, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched for papers published between January 1980 and February 2015, using the keywords thoracic outlet syndrome, and treatment and surgical...
September 22, 2016: Annals of Vascular Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27664077/exercise-enhanced-ultrasound-guided-anterior-scalene-muscle-pectoralis-minor-muscle-blocks-can-facilitate-the-diagnosis-of-neurogenic-thoracic-outlet-syndrome-in-the-high-performance-overhead-athlete
#16
Michael M Bottros, Jacob D AuBuchon, Lauren N McLaughlin, David W Altchek, Karl A Illig, Robert W Thompson
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2017: American Journal of Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27659601/totally-endoscopic-vats-first-rib-resection-for-thoracic-outlet-syndrome
#17
Robert S George, Richard Milton, Nilanjan Chaudhuri, Emmanuel Kefaloyannis, Kostas Papagiannopoulos
BACKGROUND: Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) causes neurologic symptoms in 95% of cases and vascular symptoms in 5% of cases. Surgical resection is curative. Endoscopic-assisted transaxillary first rib resection has been previously reported. In this study we report a totally endoscopic video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) approach using tailored endoscopic instruments. METHODS: Ten patients (8 women; average age, 32.3 ± 5.6 years) with TOS underwent VATS first rib resection following failure of symptom improvement with physiotherapy...
January 2017: Annals of Thoracic Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27565607/reporting-standards-of-the-society-for-vascular-surgery-for-thoracic-outlet-syndrome
#18
REVIEW
Karl A Illig, Dean Donahue, Audra Duncan, Julie Freischlag, Hugh Gelabert, Kaj Johansen, Sheldon Jordan, Richard Sanders, Robert Thompson
Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a group of disorders all having in common compression at the thoracic outlet. Three structures are at risk: the brachial plexus, the subclavian vein, and the subclavian artery, producing neurogenic (NTOS), venous (VTOS), and arterial (ATOS) thoracic outlet syndromes, respectively. Each of these three are separate entities, though they can coexist and possibly overlap. The treatment of NTOS, in particular, has been hampered by lack of data, which in turn is the result of inconsistent definitions and diagnosis, uncertainty with regard to treatment options, and lack of consistent outcome measures...
September 2016: Journal of Vascular Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27565596/reporting-standards-of-the-society-for-vascular-surgery-for-thoracic-outlet-syndrome-executive-summary
#19
REVIEW
Karl A Illig, Dean Donahue, Audra Duncan, Julie Freischlag, Hugh Gelabert, Kaj Johansen, Sheldon Jordan, Richard Sanders, Robert Thompson
Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a group of disorders all having in common compression at the thoracic outlet. Three structures are at risk: the brachial plexus, the subclavian vein, and the subclavian artery, producing neurogenic (NTOS), venous (VTOS), and arterial (ATOS) thoracic outlet syndromes, respectively. Each of these three are separate entities, though they can coexist and possibly overlap. The treatment of NTOS, in particular, has been hampered by lack of data, which in turn is the result of inconsistent definitions and diagnosis, uncertainty with regard to treatment options, and lack of consistent outcome measures...
September 2016: Journal of Vascular Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27531080/venous-thoracic-outlet-syndrome-as-a-cause-of-intractable-migraines
#20
Veer Chahwala, Jun Tashiro, Xiaoyi Li, Atif Baqai, Jorge Rey, Handel R Robinson
Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) refers to the compression of the neurovascular bundle within the thoracic outlet. Cases are classified by primary etiology-arterial, neurogenic, or venous. In addition to the typical symptoms of arm swelling and paresthesias, headaches have been reported as a potential symptom of TOS. In this report, we describe a patient with debilitating migraines, which were consistently preceded by unilateral arm swelling. Resolution of symptoms occurred only after thoracic outlet decompression...
February 2017: Annals of Vascular Surgery
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