Read by QxMD icon Read

Neurogenic tos

Sebastian Povlsen, Bo Povlsen
The diagnosis of thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) has long been a controversial and challenging one. Despite common presentations with pain in the neck and upper extremity, there are a host of presenting patterns that can vary within and between the subdivisions of neurogenic, venous, and arterial TOS. Furthermore, there is a plethora of differential diagnoses, from peripheral compressive neuropathies, to intrinsic shoulder pathologies, to pathologies at the cervical spine. Depending on the subdivision of TOS suspected, diagnostic investigations are currently of varying importance, necessitating high dependence on good history taking and clinical examination...
March 20, 2018: Diagnostics
Kevin T Jubbal, Dmitry Zavlin, Joshua D Harris, Shari R Liberman, Anthony Echo
BACKGROUND: Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a complex entity resulting in neurogenic or vascular manifestations. A wide array of procedures has evolved, each with its own benefits and drawbacks. The authors hypothesized that treatment of TOS with first rib resection (FRR) may lead to increased complication rates. METHODS: A retrospective case control study was performed on the basis of the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database from 2005 to 2014...
March 1, 2018: Hand: Official Journal of the American Association for Hand Surgery
Amgad Hanna, Larry O'Neil Bodden, Gabriel R L Siebiger
Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is caused by compression of the brachial plexus and/or subclavian vessels as they pass through the cervicothoracobrachial region, exiting the chest. There are three main types of TOS: neurogenic TOS, arterial TOS, and venous TOS. Neurogenic TOS accounts for approximately 95% of all cases, and it is usually caused by physical trauma (posttraumatic etiology), chronic repetitive motion (functional etiology), or bone or muscle anomalies (congenital etiology). We present two cases in which neurogenic TOS was elicited by vascular compression of the inferior portion of the brachial plexus...
January 2018: Journal of Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Injury
J Westley Ohman, Ahmmad A Abuirqeba, Senthil N Jayarajan, Joshua Balderman, Robert W Thompson
BACKGROUND: Body weight affects outcomes of surgical treatment for various conditions, but its effects on the treatment of neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (NTOS) are unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of body weight on technical and functional outcomes of surgical treatment for NTOS. METHODS: A retrospective review of prospectively collected data was conducted for 265 patients that underwent supraclavicular decompression for NTOS between January 1, 2014 and March 31, 2016...
February 5, 2018: Annals of Vascular Surgery
Joseph M White, Andrew J Soo Hoo, Scott R Golarz
Background: Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (nTOS) is a relatively common disorder and often affects younger, physically active populations. The modern American military is a population at risk for the development of nTOS given the intense physical training requirements. The purpose of this study is to determine functional recovery in the active duty military population resulting in full, unrestricted return-to-duty status following supraclavicular thoracic outlet decompression with partial first rib resection, partial anterior scalenectomy, and brachial plexus neurolysis...
January 1, 2018: Military Medicine
Robert R Hagan, Joseph A Ricci, Kyle R Eberlin
Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a cause of upper extremity and shoulder dysfunction. TOS can present with a wide range of symptoms due to compression of the brachial plexus or its branches during their passage through the cervicothoracobrachial region or scalene triangle. There are three types of TOS: arterial, venous, and neurogenic. Neurogenic TOS (nTOS) is by far the most frequent type and represents more than 95% of all cases. Historically, surgical intervention for all types of TOS has evolved based on the treatment for a vascular etiology and has typically included a first rib resection...
February 2, 2018: Journal of Reconstructive Microsurgery
G Samoila, C P Twine, I M Williams
Introduction Paget-Schroetter syndrome is a rare effort thrombosis of the axillary-subclavian vein, mainly occurring in young male patients. Current management involves immediate catheter directed thrombolysis, followed by surgical decompression of the subclavian vein. This has been invariably performed using a transaxillary or supraclavicular approach. However, the subclavian vein crosses the first rib anteriorly just behind the manubrium and can also be accessed via an infraclavicular incision. Methods MEDLINE® and Embase™ were searched for all studies on outcomes in patients undergoing infraclavicular first rib resection for treatment of Paget-Schroetter syndrome...
February 2018: Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England
Colin P Ryan, Nicolas J Mouawad, Patrick S Vaccaro, Michael R Go
Controversies in the treatment of venous thoracic outlet syndrome (VTOS) have been discussed for decades, but still persist. Calls for more objective reporting standards have pushed practice towards comprehensive venous evaluations and interventions after first rib resection (FRR) for all patients. In our practice, we have relied on patient-centered, patient-reported outcomes to guide adjunctive treatment and measure success. Thus, we sought to investigate the use of thrombolysis versus anticoagulation alone, timing of FRR following thrombolysis, post-FRR venous intervention, and FRR for McCleery syndrome (MCS) and their impact on patient symptoms and return to function...
January 23, 2018: Diagnostics
Hosseinali Abdolrazaghi, Azade Riyahi, Morteza Taghavi, Pezhman Farshidmehr, Abolfazl Mohammadbeigi
We report a rare case of multiple hereditary exostosis where patient presented with bilateral base of neck exostoses with concurrent compression of brachial plexus and subclavian artery and vein. The patient was a young 26-year-old woman with chief complaints of pain in the left upper extremity, paresthesia in the left ring and little finger, and weakness in hand movement and grip. On referral, history, physical examination, radiological imaging, and electrodiagnostic tests evaluated the patient. Due to severe pain and disability in performing routine activities, surgical intervention was necessary...
January 2018: Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia
Jesse Peek, Cornelis G Vos, Çağdas Ünlü, Michiel A Schreve, Rob H W van de Mortel, Jean-Paul P M de Vries
First rib resection for thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is clinically successful and safe in most patients. However, long-term functional outcomes are still insufficiently known. Long-term functional outcome was assessed using a validated questionnaire. A multicenter retrospective cohort study including all patients who underwent operations for TOS from January 2005 until December 2016. Clinical records were reviewed and the long-term functional outcome was assessed by the 11-item version of the Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (QuickDASH) questionnaire...
January 12, 2018: Diagnostics
Jesus M Matos, Lorena Gonzalez, Elias Kfoury, Angela Echeverria, Carlos F Bechara, Peter H Lin
Objectives Thoracic outlet syndrome, a condition commonly reported in adults, occurs infrequently in the pediatric population. The objective of this study was to assess the outcome of surgical interventions of thoracic outlet syndrome in pediatric patients. Methods Clinical records of all pediatric patients with thoracic outlet syndrome who underwent operative repair from 2002 to 2015 in a tertiary pediatric hospital were reviewed. Pertinent clinical variables and treatment outcomes were analyzed. Results Sixty-eight patients underwent a total of 72 thoracic outlet syndrome operations (mean age 15...
January 1, 2018: Vascular
Henrik Nuutinen, Teemu Riekkinen, Voitto Aittola, Kimmo Mäkinen, Jussi M Kärkkäinen
BACKGROUND: This study assessed the feasibility of fully endoscopic thoracoscopic first rib resection (FRR) in the treatment of neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome by comparing early outcomes of the thoracoscopic technique against the traditional transaxillary FRR. METHODS: Between 2009 and 2016, 60 consecutive FRRs were performed on 47 patients with neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (13 bilateral procedures). The first 30 procedures were performed using the traditional transaxillary technique, and the novel thoracoscopic technique was used in the next 30 operations with the same indications for operative repair...
December 27, 2017: Annals of Thoracic Surgery
J A W Teijink, N Pesser, R van Grinsven, H van Suijlekom, M R H M van Sambeek, B F L van Nuenen
Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (nTOS) is a type of thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) where compression of the brachial plexus is responsible for development of upper-extremity, head and neck symptoms. We present a 16-year-old and a 34-year-old patient with nTOS. Diagnosis in both cases was done by following the recently published reporting standards for (n)TOS. After this multidisciplinary diagnostic work-up we performed a transaxillary thoracic outlet decompression (TOD). Due to lack of literature, difficult nomenclature and complexity of diagnosis and treatment, diagnosis of nTOS is often delayed...
2017: Nederlands Tijdschrift Voor Geneeskunde
Brandon Michael Henry, Jens Vikse, Beatrice Sanna, Dominik Taterra, Martyna Gomulska, Przemysław A Pękala, R Shane Tubbs, Krzysztof A Tomaszewski
BACKGROUND: Cervical ribs (CR) are supernumerary ribs that arise from the seventh cervical vertebra. In the presence of CR, the boundaries of the interscalene triangle can be further constricted and result in neurovascular compression and thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS). The aim of our study was to provide a comprehensive evidence-based assessment of CR prevalence and their association with TOS as well as surgical approach to excision of CR and surgical patients' characteristics. METHODS: A thorough search of major electronic databases was conducted to identify any relevant studies...
February 2018: World Neurosurgery
Jennifer Hong, Jared M Pisapia, Zarina S Ali, Austin J Heuer, Erin Alexander, Gregory G Heuer, Eric L Zager
OBJECTIVE Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (nTOS) is an uncommon compression syndrome of the brachial plexus that presents with pain, sensory changes, and motor weakness in the affected limb. The authors reviewed the clinical presentations and outcomes in their series of pediatric patients with surgically treated nTOS over a 6-year period. METHODS Cases of nTOS in patients age 18 years or younger were extracted for analysis from a prospective database of peripheral nerve operations. Baseline patient characteristics, imaging and neurophysiological data, operative findings, and outcomes and complications were assessed...
November 10, 2017: Journal of Neurosurgery. Pediatrics
Kamran Aghayev, Ozcan Ciklatekerlio
BACKGROUND: There are several surgical treatment options for neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (n-TOS). However, the first rib has been shown to be the common denominator of all TOS forms and the degree of its resection has been shown to correlate with the long-term success. OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate the feasibility of posterior upper rib excision (PURE) and report early outcomes. METHODS: Nine patients presented with signs and symptoms of n-TOS...
July 6, 2017: Operative Neurosurgery (Hagerstown, Md.)
Thibault Lafosse, Malo Le Hanneur, Laurent Lafosse
Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome is caused by a neurologic compression of the brachial plexus before it reaches the arm. Three anatomic areas are common locations for such an entrapment because of their congenital and/or acquired tightness: the interscalene triangle, the costoclavicular space, and the retropectoralis minor space. Because the compression level usually remains unknown, the treatment is still controversial and most teams focus on only one potential site. We propose an all-endoscopic technique of complete brachial plexus neurolysis that can be divided into three parts, one for each entrapment area...
August 2017: Arthroscopy Techniques
William Shutze, Brad Richardson, Ryan Shutze, Kimberly Tran, Allen Dao, Gerald O Ogola, Allan Young, Greg Pearl
BACKGROUND: Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (NTOS) results from compression of the brachial plexus by the clavicle, first rib, and scalene muscles and may develop secondary to repetitive motion of the upper extremity. Athletes routinely perform repetitive motions, and sports requiring significant arm and shoulder use may put the participant at increased risk for NTOS. Competitive athletes who develop NTOS may require first rib resection and scalenectomy (FRRS) for symptomatic relief...
December 2017: Journal of Vascular Surgery
Erion Qaja, Sara Honari, Robert Rhee
Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) was first introduced in literature by Peet et al. in 1956. Since then is has been studied extensively and subcategorized into at least four closely related syndrome. Neurogenic TOS due to the compression of brachial plexus, arterial TOS in cases of compression of the subclavian artery, venous TOS in cases of compression of the subclavian vein, and non-specific type of TOS. Neurogenic TOS is by far the most common consisting of 95% of the cases, followed by venous and lastly arterial...
August 2017: Journal of Surgical Case Reports
Sofoklis Mitsos, Davide Patrini, Sara Velo, Achilleas Antonopoulos, Martin Hayward, Robert S George, David Lawrence, Nikolaos Panagiotopoulos
Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a constellation of signs and symptoms caused by compression of the neurovascular structures in the thoracic outlet. TOS may be classified as either neurogenic TOS (NTOS) or vascular TOS: venous TOS (VTOS) or arterial TOS (ATOS), depending on the specific structure being affected. The basis for the surgical treatment of TOS is resection of the first rib, and it may be combined with scalenectomy or cervical rib resection. Herein, we describe a case of arterial thoracic outlet syndrome which was successfully treated with totally endoscopic video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) first rib resection...
2017: Case Reports in Pulmonology
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"