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Prison Reentry

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29890873/reentry-programs-for-adult-male-offender-recidivism-and-reintegration-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#1
Maria Berghuis
The aim of this review is to assess the effectiveness of reentry programs designed to reduce recidivism and ensure successful reintegration among adult, male offenders. Studies were included if they (a) evaluated a reentry program incorporating elements dealing with the transition from prison to community for adult, male offenders; (b) utilized a randomized controlled design; and (c) measured recidivism as a primary outcome. In addition, secondary outcomes measures of reintegration were also included. The systematic search of 8,179 titles revealed nine randomized controlled evaluations that fulfilled eligibility criteria...
June 1, 2018: International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29728898/perceptions-of-health-related-community-reentry-challenges-among-incarcerated-drug-users-in-azerbaijan-kyrgyzstan-and-ukraine
#2
Julia Rozanova, Olga Morozova, Lyuba Azbel, Chethan Bachireddy, Jacob M Izenberg, Tetiana Kiriazova, Sergiy Dvoryak, Frederick L Altice
Facing competing demands with limited resources following release from prison, people who inject drugs (PWID) may neglect health needs, with grave implications including relapse, overdose, and non-continuous care. We examined the relative importance of health-related tasks after release compared to tasks of everyday life among a total sample of 577 drug users incarcerated in Ukraine, Azerbaijan, and Kyrgyzstan. A proxy measure of whether participants identified a task as applicable (easy or hard) versus not applicable was used to determine the importance of each task...
May 4, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29723018/coming-home-from-prison-adapting-military-resilience-training-to-enhance-successful-community-reintegration-for-justice-involved-iraq-afghanistan-veterans
#3
Shoba Sreenivasan, Joel Rosenthal, Daniel E Smee, Keith Wilson, Jim McGuire
We propose a veteran-centric justice model of resilience training developed by the military for assisting service members coming home from war and modify it to assist Iraq/Afghanistan veterans coming home from prison. Incarceration has been identified as a stress aftereffect of the prolonged Iraq and Afghanistan combat deployments. Notably, the rate of Iraq and Afghanistan-era incarcerated veterans increased from 4% to 13% between 2004 and 2012 for all incarcerated veterans. Successful reentry to the community from prison incarceration is difficult, with rearrest and reincarceration a frequent occurrence...
May 2018: Psychological Services
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29721814/pre-incarceration-rates-of-nonmedical-use-of-prescription-drugs-among-black-men-from-urban-counties
#4
Paris Wheeler, Danelle Stevens-Watkins, Joi-Sheree' Knighton, Carlos Mahaffey, Dominiqueca Lewis
There are inconsistent findings regarding the rates of nonmedical prescription drug use (NMPDU) among Black Americans. The majority of previous studies used pharmaceutical names of drugs and relied on national data that excludes incarcerated populations, in which Black men are overrepresented. Therefore, the current study aimed to describe pre-incarceration rates of NMPDU among Black men in prison using culturally relevant alternative drug names. We recruited 208 incarcerated (adult age 18 or older) Black men nearing community reentry to urban counties from four state prisons in Kentucky...
May 2, 2018: Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29697744/the-names-have-been-changed-to-protect-the-humanity-person-first-language-in-correctional-health-epidemiology
#5
Precious S Bedell, Anne C Spaulding, Marvin So, Jennifer C Sarrett
After objections surfaced following a call for papers on "Prisoner Health," the editors of Epidemiologic Reviews decided to rename this year's volume "Incarceration and Health." In this commentary, we trace the origins of person-first language and explain why using appropriate terms in correctional health, including correctional health epidemiology, matters. We discuss the potential consequences of person-first language for justice-involved individuals and how inclusive language might affect the social, emotional, and physical well-being of individuals, families, and communities...
June 1, 2018: American Journal of Epidemiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29680934/making-the-connection-using-videoconferencing-to-increase-linkage-to-care-for-incarcerated-persons-living-with-hiv-post-release
#6
Antoine D Brantley, Karissa M Page, Barry Zack, Kira Radtke Friedrich, Deborah Wendell, William T Robinson, DeAnn Gruber
Incarcerated persons living with HIV (PLWH) have relatively high levels of HIV care engagement and antiretroviral therapy adherence during incarceration, but few are able to maintain these levels upon reentry into the community. In Louisiana, PLWH nearing release from prisons were offered video conferences with case managers housed in community based organizations aimed at facilitating linkage to care in the community. Of the 144 persons who received a video conference during the study period, 74.3% had linked to HIV care in the community within 90 days after release...
April 21, 2018: AIDS and Behavior
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29520740/the-relationship-between-severe-mental-disorders-and-recidivism-in-a-sample-of-women-released-from-prison
#7
Erin A King, Stephen J Tripodi, Christopher A Veeh
Women are one of the fastest growing sectors of the prison population, and have different pathways into prison and differing needs during the reentry process when compared to men (Cloyes et al. J Forensic Nurs; 6:3-14, 2010b; Herrschaft et al. J Offender Rehabil; 48:463-482, 2009). Women report higher levels of mental health problems overall, and report more severe symptomatology (Cloyes et al. J Forensic Nurs; 6:3-14, 2010a; Hyde 2012; Lynch et al. 2014). The current study focuses on the role of severe mental disorders for women released from prison...
March 8, 2018: Psychiatric Quarterly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29500640/systematic-review-of-qualitative-evaluations-of-reentry-programs-addressing-problematic-drug-use-and-mental-health-disorders-amongst-people-transitioning-from-prison-to-communities
#8
Sacha Kendall, Sarah Redshaw, Stephen Ward, Sarah Wayland, Elizabeth Sullivan
BACKGROUND: The paper presents a systematic review and metasynthesis of findings from qualitative evaluations of community reentry programs. The programs sought to engage recently released adult prison inmates with either problematic drug use or a mental health disorder. METHODS: Seven biomedical and social science databases, Cinahl, Pubmed, Scopus, Proquest, Medline, Sociological abstracts and Web of Science and publisher database Taylor and Francis were searched in 2016 resulting in 2373 potential papers...
March 2, 2018: Health & Justice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29295666/life-after-examining-the-relationship-between-sociobehavioral-factors-and-mental-health-among-african-american-ex-offenders
#9
Carlos C Mahaffey, Danelle Stevens-Watkins, Carl Leukefeld
Mental health problems are 3 times higher among prisoners than the general population. After release, reentry barriers and other factors can exacerbate mental problems. This study of 250 African American ex-offenders examines the relationship between sociobehavioral factors and mental health. Independent variables included self-reported health, alcohol use, employment, and history of mental problems before prison. Covariates included the number of immediate family with mental problems and the number of serious conflicts with family members or friends...
January 1, 2018: International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29237313/the-watchful-eye-of-god-the-role-of-religion-in-the-rehabilitation-and-reentry-of-repentant-jewish-prisoners
#10
Michal Morag, Elly Teman
Can participation in a religious rehabilitation program benefit a released prisoner's reentry into the community, and if so, how? Which elements of the religious worldview can be translated into tools for promoting desistance? Using a qualitative approach, we conducted 30 interviews with released prisoners from 3 months to 5 years beyond release who participated in a Jewish faith-based rehabilitation program administered by Israel's Prisoner Rehabilitation Authority. We interviewed participants in the Torah Rehabilitation Program about the role of religion in their lives and in their desistance from crime...
May 2018: International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29217313/characteristics-and-health-needs-of-veterans-in-jails-and-prisons-what-we-know-and-do-not-know-about-incarcerated-women-veterans
#11
Janice D McCall, Jack Tsai
PURPOSE: The majority of U.S. veterans in prisons and local jails are men, but incarcerated women veterans remain an important and understudied group. METHODS: This study reported differences in sociodemographic, health, and criminal justice characteristics using Veterans Affairs (VA) administrative data on a national sample of 30,964 incarcerated veterans (30,440 men and 524 women) who received outreach from the VA Health Care for Reentry Veterans program between 2007 and 2011...
March 2018: Women's Health Issues: Official Publication of the Jacobs Institute of Women's Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29136252/promoting-reentry-well-being-a-novel-assessment-tool-for-individualized-service-assignment-in-prisoner-reentry-programs
#12
Christopher A Veeh, Tanya Renn, Carrie Pettus-Davis
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 1, 2018: Social Work
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29095374/achieving-drug-and-alcohol-abstinence-among-recently-incarcerated-homeless-women-a-randomized-controlled-trial-comparing-dialectical-behavioral-therapy-case-management-with-a-health-promotion-program
#13
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Adeline M Nyamathi, Sanghyuk S Shin, Jolene Smeltzer, Benissa E Salem, Kartik Yadav, Maria L Ekstrand, Susan F Turner, Mark Faucette
BACKGROUND: Homeless female ex-offenders (homeless female offenders) exiting jail and prison are at a critical juncture during reentry and transitioning into the community setting. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the study was to compare the effect of a dialectical behavioral therapy-case management (DBT-CM) program with a health promotion (HP) program on achieving drug and alcohol abstinence among female parolees/probationers residing in the community. METHODS: We conducted a multicenter parallel randomized controlled trial with 130 female parolees/probationers (aged 19-64 years) residing in the community randomly assigned to either DBT-CM (n = 65) or HP (n = 65)...
November 2017: Nursing Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29067864/stress-substance-use-and-yoga-in-the-context-of-community-reentry-following-incarceration
#14
Alexandra S Wimberly, Malitta Engstrom
This field report provides a rationale for the potential of yoga to support reductions in stress and substance use among people returning to the community from jail or prison and describes an agency-based example of yoga classes offered in this context. People who have recently experienced incarceration face a multitude of stressors, which can heighten the risk of substance use and support the need to address stress reduction as a pathway to reduced substance use. One promising intervention is yoga, which has demonstrated significant stress-reduction effects among several populations...
January 2018: Journal of Correctional Health Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28901840/reentry-program-and-social-work-education-training-the-next-generation-of-criminal-justice-social-workers
#15
Nancy D Franke, Dan Treglia, Ram A Cnaan
PURPOSE: Social work plays a marginal role in opposing the trend of mass incarceration and high rates of recidivism, and social work education offers limited opportunities for students to specialize in working with people who are currently or were previously incarcerated. How to train students of social work to work against mass-incarceration is still challenging. METHODS: The authors devised and implemented an in-school social service agency devoted to working with people pre and post release from a prison system...
November 2017: Journal of Evidence-informed Social Work
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28899394/a-two-state-comparative-implementation-of-peer-support-intervention-to-link-veterans-to-health-related-services-after-incarceration-a-study-protocol
#16
COMPARATIVE STUDY
Molly M Simmons, Benjamin G Fincke, Mari-Lynn Drainoni, Bo Kim, Tom Byrne, David Smelson, Kevin Casey, Marsha L Ellison, Christy Visher, Jessica Blue-Howells, D Keith McInnes
BACKGROUND: Approximately 600,000 persons are released from prison annually in the United States. Relatively few receive sufficient re-entry services and are at risk for unemployment, homelessness, poverty, substance abuse relapse and recidivism. Persons leaving prison who have a mental illness and/or a substance use disorder are particularly challenged. This project aims to create a peer mentor program to extend the reach and effectiveness of reentry services provided by the Department of Veterans' Affairs (VA)...
September 12, 2017: BMC Health Services Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28705357/trajectories-of-neighborhood-attainment-after-prison
#17
Keunbok Lee, David J Harding, Jeffrey D Morenoff
A potentially important but understudied aspect of prisoner reentry is the neighborhood environments experienced by formerly incarcerated people. We know that many formerly incarcerated people return to very disadvantaged neighborhood environments and that returning to disadvantaged neighborhoods after prison increases the risk of recidivism and reduces employment. Yet very little is known about the social, economic, and institutional processes that sort formerly incarcerated people into different neighborhoods after release or their trajectories of neighborhood attainment over time...
August 2017: Social Science Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28593579/the-reciprocal-lagged-effects-of-substance-use-and-recidivism-in-a-prisoner-reentry-context
#18
Nathan Wong Link, Leah K Hamilton
BACKGROUND: Much work has investigated the association between substance use, crime, and recidivism, yet little scholarship has examined these associations longitudinally among samples of recently released prisoners. We examine the lagged reciprocal effects of hard substance use and crime, among other covariates, in the context of the prisoner reentry process. METHODS: We rely on data from the Serious and Violent Offender Reentry Initiative (SVORI) evaluation and employ cross-lagged panel models to examine short-term changes in substance use and crime over time among a large sample of high-risk, former prisoners (N = 1697)...
December 2017: Health & Justice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28503968/the-five-stages-of-prisoner-reentry-toward-a-process-theory
#19
Ioan Durnescu
This article is based on an ethnographic study involving 58 Roma and Romanian participants who were released from Jilava Prion in Romania between January and July 2015. The methodology involved interviews, observation, questionnaires, and photovoice. The findings seem to suggest that most of the factors associated with desistance and reentry in the literature are relevant to the ex-prisoner's experiences. The main contribution of this article is the observation that these factors come into play at different times and in different stages of the reentry process...
May 1, 2017: International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28481612/examining-the-bidirectional-association-between-veteran-homelessness-and-incarceration-within-the-context-of-permanent-supportive-housing
#20
Meagan Cusack, Ann Elizabeth Montgomery
Homelessness and incarceration share a bidirectional association: individuals experiencing homelessness are more likely to be incarcerated and former inmates are more likely to become homeless. Permanent supportive housing (PSH) programs have demonstrated positive outcomes for participants with criminal histories, yet participants continue to exit to jail or prison and experience subsequent homelessness. Using data on Veterans participating in a PSH program at 4 locations between 2011 and 2014 (N = 1,060), logistic regression was used to examine the risk factors for exiting PSH because of incarceration and returning to homelessness...
May 2017: Psychological Services
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