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Ertugrul Kılıc, Barış Demiriz, Nurgül Isıkay, Abdullah E Yıldırım, Selman Can, Cem Basmacı
OBJECTIVES: To observe the effects of both propofol/alfentanil and propofol/ketamine on sedation during upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy in morbidly obese patients (UGSEMOP). METHODS: In a prospective, double-blinded, randomized clinical study, 52 patients scheduled for UGSEMOP were assigned to either group A (n=26; 10 µg/kg intravenous [IV] alfentanil) or group K (n=26; 0.5 mg/kg IV ketamine). Each patient was administered 0.7 mg/kg propofol for induction...
November 2016: Saudi Medical Journal
Hamid Reza Bahrami, Shokouhsadat Hamedi, Roshanak Salari, Mohammadreza Noras
Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a chronic digestive disorder, which is characterized by abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea and constipation periods. The etiology is unknown. Based on the different mechanisms in the etiology, treatment focuses on controlling symptoms. Due to the longtime of syndrome, inadequacy of current treatments, financial burden for patients and pharmacologic effects, several patients have turned to the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Complementary and alternative treatments for IBS include hypnosis, acupuncture, cognitive behavior therapy, yoga, and herbal medicine...
August 2016: Electronic Physician
Youngsin Jung, Erik K St Louis
REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a common parasomnia disorder affecting between 1 and 7 % of community-dwelling adults, most frequently older adults. RBD is characterized by nocturnal complex motor behavior and polysomnographic REM sleep without atonia. RBD is strongly associated with synucleinopathy neurodegeneration. The approach to RBD management is currently twofold: symptomatic treatment to prevent injury and prognostic counseling and longitudinal follow-up surveillance for phenoconversion toward overt neurodegenerative disorders...
November 2016: Current Treatment Options in Neurology
Ulrike Halsband, Thomas Gerhard Wolf
Visiting the dentist is often accompanied by apprehension or anxiety. People, who suffer from specific dental phobia, a disproportional fear of dental procedures show psychological and physiological symptoms which make dental treatments difficult or impossible. For such purposes, hypnosis is often used in dental practice as an alternative for a number of treatments adjuvant or instead of sedation or general anesthetic, as medication is often associated with risks and side effects. This is the first study to address the effects of a brief dental hypnosis on the fear processing structures of the brain in dental phobics using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)...
October 6, 2016: Journal of Physiology, Paris
Q Deeley
In the 19th century it was recognized that neurologic symptoms could be caused by "morbid ideation" as well as organic lesions. The subsequent observation that hysteric (now called "functional") symptoms could be produced and removed by hypnotic suggestion led Charcot to hypothesize that suggestion mediated the effects of ideas on hysteric symptoms through as yet unknown effects on brain activity. The advent of neuroimaging 100 years later revealed strikingly similar neural correlates in experiments matching functional symptoms with clinical analogs created by suggestion...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
Q Deeley
Suggestion in hypnosis has been applied to the treatment of functional neurologic symptoms since the earliest descriptions of hypnosis in the 19th century. Suggestion in this sense refers to an intentional communication of beliefs or ideas, whether verbally or nonverbally, to produce subjectively convincing changes in experience and behavior. The recognition of suggestion as a psychologic process with therapeutic applications was closely linked to the derivation of hypnosis from earlier healing practices. Animal magnetism, the immediate precursor of hypnosis, arrived at a psychologic concept of suggestion along with other ideas and practices which were then incorporated into hypnosis...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
Isabelle Merckaert, Florence Lewis, France Delevallez, Sophie Herman, Marie Caillier, Nicole Delvaux, Yves Libert, Aurore Liénard, Jean-Marie Nogaret, David Ogez, Pierre Scalliet, Jean-Louis Slachmuylder, Paul Van Houtte, Darius Razavi
OBJECTIVE: To compare in a multicenter randomized controlled trial the benefits in terms of anxiety regulation of a 15-session single-component group intervention (SGI) based on support with those of a 15-session multi-component structured manualized group intervention (MGI) combining support with cognitive-behavioral and hypnosis components. METHODS: Patients with non-metastatic breast cancer were randomly assigned at the beginning of the survivorship period to the SGI (n = 83) or MGI (n = 87)...
October 8, 2016: Psycho-oncology
Jose M Remes-Troche
Chest pain that is not explained by reflux disease or cardiac, musculoskeletal, mucosal, or motor esophageal abnormalities is classified as functional chest pain (FCP). Although several mechanisms are involved, esophageal hypersensitivity plays a major role and it could be considered a biomarker for FCP. Psychologic comorbidity such as anxiety, neuroticism, depression, and somatization is common. When the diagnosis of FCP is suspected, patients should undergo evaluation with esophageal motility testing, endoscopy, 24-h esophageal pH monitoring, and in some cases, sensory tests...
October 5, 2016: Current Treatment Options in Gastroenterology
Teodora Surdea-Blaga, Adriana Baban, Laurentiu Nedelcu, Dan L Dumitrascu
Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients often present psychoform symptoms or psychiatric disorders. Among the psychological factors studied in IBS patients, two seem to influence mostly its severity: catastrophizing and somatization. Somatization is an independent risk factor for IBS. In addition, somatization more than the severity of IBS influences the way the patients perceive their illness, the outcome and the efficacy of treatment. Irritable bowel syndrome patients demonstrate greater catastrophizing scores than controls, and pain catastrophizing is a significant predictor of gastrointestinal symptoms related to pain...
September 2016: Journal of Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases: JGLD
Jocelyn M Elliott, Rochelle E Cox, Amanda J Barnier
Fregoli delusion involves the belief that strangers are known people in disguise. We aimed to model aspects of this delusion for the first time using hypnosis. We informed hypnotised subjects that someone would enter the room (a confederate) and they would believe this person was someone they knew in disguise. After testing their reaction to the confederate, we challenged their delusion by directly contradicting their belief and then asking them to focus on the confederate's voice and gait. Finally, we indexed whether they could identify photographs of the confederate...
September 24, 2016: Consciousness and Cognition
Evaldas Pipinis, Sigita Melynyte, Thomas Koenig, Lina Jarutyte, Klaus Linkenkaer-Hansen, Osvaldas Ruksenas, Inga Griskova-Bulanova
There is a gap in understanding on how physiologically observed activity is related to the subjective, internally oriented experience during resting state. Microstate analysis is a frequent approach to evaluate resting-state EEG. But the relationship of commonly observed resting-state microstates to psychological domains of resting is not clear. The Amsterdam Resting-State Questionnaire (ARSQ) was recently introduced, offering an effective way to quantify subjective states after a period of resting and associate these quantifiers to psychological and physiological variables...
September 19, 2016: Brain Topography
G Chabridon, N Nekrouf, A Bioy
Hypnosis is very fashionable as an entertainment through TV shows searching for new sensational experiences. What about its practice in the medical world? The aim of this article is to answer to this question. Therefore, we contacted every French University Hospital of each region to find out if hypnosis was practiced for the care of pain (hypnoanalgesia), for chirurgical procedures (hypnosedation) and in adult psychiatry care units (hypnotherapy). For this last practice, we also questioned the type of indications...
September 16, 2016: L'Encéphale
Cedrick Zaouter, Thomas M Hemmerling, Romain Lanchon, Emanuela Valoti, Alain Remy, Sébastien Leuillet, Alexandre Ouattara
BACKGROUND: In this pilot study, we tested a novel automatic anesthesia system for closed-loop administration of IV anesthesia drugs for cardiac surgical procedures with cardiopulmonary bypass. This anesthesia drug delivery robot integrates all 3 components of general anesthesia: hypnosis, analgesia, and muscle relaxation. METHODS: Twenty patients scheduled for elective cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass were enrolled. Propofol, remifentanil, and rocuronium were administered using closed-loop feedback control...
October 2016: Anesthesia and Analgesia
Meiyun Zhang, Lihua Huang, Zhixian Fen, Lewen Sha, Lixia Chen
INTRODUCTION: Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has been shown to be effective in mitigating various psychosocial impacts from breast cancer. Long-term studies have yielded mixed findings on the outcome of CBT in breast cancer settings, especially with respect to quality of life (QOL) and the quantified degree of stress (QDS). EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: Medline, Cochrane, Embase, and Google Scholar databases were searched and randomized controlled trials relevant to the use of CBT and its variants in breast cancer patients were selected, and their pooled results meta-analyzed...
September 16, 2016: Minerva Medica
Arnaud Potié, Fabienne Roelants, Audrey Pospiech, Mona Momeni, Christine Watremez
The aim of this review is to summarize data published on the use of perioperative hypnosis in patients undergoing breast cancer surgery (BCS). Indeed, the majority of BCS patients experience stress, anxiety, nausea, vomiting, and pain. Correct management of the perioperative period and surgical removal of the primary tumor are clearly essential but can affect patients on different levels and hence have a negative impact on oncological outcomes. This review examines the effect of clinical hypnosis performed during the perioperative period...
2016: Anesthesiology Research and Practice
Jean-Rémy Martin, Jérôme Sackur, Hernan Anlló, Peter Naish, Zoltan Dienes
The way we experience and estimate time - subjective time - does not systematically correspond to objective time (the physical duration of an event). Many factors can influence subjective time and lead to mental dilation or compression of objective time. The emotional valence of stimuli or the levels of attention or expectancy are known to modulate subjective time even though objective time is constant. Hypnosis too is known to alter people's perception of time. However, it is not known whether hypnotic time distortions are intrinsic perceptual effects, based for example on the changing rate of an internal clock, or rather the result of a response to demand characteristics...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
Neda Eskandari, Z Jane Wang, Guy A Dumont
With the motivation of providing safety for a patient under anesthesia, this paper suggests conditions for evaluating the correctness of an available user interface for systems under shared control based on observability and predictability requirements. Situation awareness is necessary for the user to make correct decisions about the inputs. In this article, we develop a technique to investigate the conditions under which an anesthetists can attain situation awareness about a limited but important aspect of anesthesia, namely depth of hypnosis (DOH)...
September 2, 2016: Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing
Stephen Krystek, V K Kumar
Groups of participants (N = 164) were randomly assigned to three conditions: Group 1 received a trance induction, Group 2 received task-motivational instructions, and Group 3-"cold start" control-was simply told, "We will begin the hypnosis procedure now." All participants received the Creative Imagination Scale suggestions and then completed the Creative Imagination Scale and Inventory Scale of Hypnotic Depth. The three conditions did not differ significantly either on the Creative Imagination Scale or in reported hypnotic depth...
October 2016: American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis
Arreed Barabasz, Marianne Barabasz
The hypnotic induction is intended to induce hypnosis. This implies that what is sought is intended to go beyond what might be wrought by mere suggestion, expectancy, and social influence. The experimentally controlled research showing that the induction makes a difference and how small changes in wording of suggestions can produce orthogonal responses is briefly reviewed. This article explains the principles of induction and three critical phases of hypnotic induction in detail. An arm levitation scripted protocol demonstrating how to respond to the patient using the three phases to maximize responses to hypnotic suggestions is presented...
October 2016: American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis
Richard P Kluft
In clinical practice, the process of induction may prove more complex and nuanced than its presentation in workshop training would suggest. The relatively straightforward cognitive and instrumental educational domains address defining the concept of induction and instructing workshop participants about how inductions can be performed. However, in work with patients, factors relevant to the attitudinal domain of education become increasingly salient and speak to the importance of how the person inducing hypnosis relates to the person in whom hypnosis is to be induced and how that person goes about crafting a constructive rather than formulaic approach to the induction of hypnosis for a unique individual...
October 2016: American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis
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