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Abducens Nerve

Preeti Patil-Chhablani, Krishnapriya Kothamasu, Ramesh Kekunnaya, Virender Sachdeva, Vivek Warkad
PURPOSE: To evaluate the surgical outcome of augmented superior rectus transposition (SRT) and medial rectus recession (MRc) in patients with abducens nerve palsy. METHODS: The medical records of consecutive patients with abducens nerve palsy who underwent unilateral or bilateral simultaneous SRT with MRc from January 2012 to December 2014. Patients with previous strabismus surgery or botulinum toxin injection were excluded. Primary outcome measures were esotropia in primary position and abduction deficit...
October 7, 2016: Journal of AAPOS: the Official Publication of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus
Pravin Salunke, Karthigeyan Madhivanan, Nasib Kamali, Ravi Garg
Bilateral abducens and facial palsy following head injury are extremely rare. We present a patient with post-traumatic bilateral facial and abducens palsy. There were bitemporal fractures that did not correspond with the facial canal. Despite complete facial palsy with axonal degeneration and > 90% facial muscle degenervation, conservative management helped. This report highlights the importance of conservative management in post-traumatic complete facial palsy especially when the fracture line does not correspond with the facial canal...
October 2016: Asian Journal of Neurosurgery
Cora H Brown, Alexander J Feng, Ilya Igolnikov, Ernesto Cruz
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: PM & R: the Journal of Injury, Function, and Rehabilitation
Murat Ulutas, Suat Boyacı, Akın Akakın, Türker Kılıç, Kaya Aksoy
BACKGROUND: Tumors of the middle fossa or cavernous sinus (CS), or intraorbital tumors, can penetrate each other through the superior orbital fissure (SOF) or neighboring tissue. These complicated pathologies are often treated with highly invasive surgical procedures. In this article, we demonstrate surgical anatomic dissections of the CS, SOF, orbital apex (OA), and dura mater extending to the periorbita from the middle fossa, by performing an epidural dissection via a lateral orbitotomy approach, and discuss findings that may provide guidance during surgery in these regions...
November 2016: Acta Neurochirurgica
Misako Kaido, Yoshihito Yuasa, Tameyoshi Yamamoto, Satoru Munakata, Naohiro Tagawa, Keiko Tanaka
We report the case of a patient who had developed multiple cranial nerve palsies in the course of possible paraneoplastic neurological syndrome (PNS) associated with gallbladder cancer. Twelve days prior to visiting our hospital, a 69-year-old man began experiencing neurological symptoms, beginning with diplopia and progressing to ptosis of the left palpebra and subsequent complete closure of the eye within 8 days. Results of the initial medical examination indicated paresis of left oculomotor (III) and abducens (VI) nerves...
September 29, 2016: Rinshō Shinkeigaku, Clinical Neurology
Shinichiro Maeshima, Tetsuya Tsunoda, Sayaka Okamoto, Yasunori Ozeki, Shigeru Sonoda
A 62-year-old right-handed man was diagnosed with a cerebral infarction in the ventromedial region of the left lower pons. He showed left abducens nerve palsy, left-sided supranuclear palsy of the lower part of the face and right hemiparesis. We hypothesized that the mechanism underlying the patient's ipsilateral supranuclear facial palsy involved the corticofacial fibers after they crossed the midline.
2016: Internal Medicine
Ma Jun, Su Shaobo, Yue Shuyuan, Zhao Yan, Li Yonggang, Chen Xiaochen, Ma Hui
AIM: The present study aimed to visualize CN using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with special parameters. It also involved the evaluation of preoperative estimates and intraoperative confirmation of the relationship between nerves and tumor by verifying the accuracy of visualization. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 3T magnetic resonance imaging scans including 3D-FSPGR, FIESTA, and DTI were used to collect information from 18 patients with skull base tumor. DTI data were integrated into the 3D slicer for fiber tracking and overlapped anatomic images to determine course of nerves...
April 16, 2015: Turkish Neurosurgery
Jonathan C P Roos, Bijan Beigi
PURPOSE: We report a very good outcome in a 44-year-old woman in whom cancer was missed as the cause of nasolacrimal duct obstruction and dacryocystitis and which was deemed inoperable after spreading to the cavernous sinus. CASE REPORT: The patient was referred to our unit 12 months following uneventful right dacryocystorhinostomy for nasolacrimal duct obstruction. This had been complicated by the formation of a significant canthal swelling 6 months later, which had been excised at that time...
January 2016: Case Reports in Ophthalmology
Fatma Yulek, Joseph L Demer
BACKGROUND: Progressive strabismus initially considered idiopathic may be caused by isolated schwannomas of motor nerves to extraocular muscles, detectable only on careful imaging. This study reviewed clinical experience of a referral practice in identifying schwannomas on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). METHODS: We reviewed 647 cases imaged for strabismus to identify presumed cranial nerve schwannomas, identified by gadodiamide-enhanced, high-resolution surface coil orbital MRI and thin-section cranial MRI...
August 2016: Journal of AAPOS: the Official Publication of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus
Luiz Henrique Dias Sandon, Gun Choi, EunSoo Park, Hyung-Chang Lee
BACKGROUND: Thoracic disc surgeries make up only a small number of all spine surgeries performed, but they can have a considerable number of postoperative complications. Numerous approaches have been developed and studied in an attempt to reduce the morbidity associated with the procedure; however, we still encounter cases that develop serious and unexpected outcomes. CASE PRESENTATION: This case report presents a patient with abducens nerve palsy after minimally invasive surgery for thoracic disc herniation with an intraoperative spinal fluid fistula...
2016: BMC Surgery
Jae-Yeon Hwang, Hye-Kyung Yoon, Jeong Hyun Lee, Hee Mang Yoon, Ah Young Jung, Young Ah Cho, Jin Seong Lee, Chong Hyun Yoon
Cranial nerve disorders are uncommon disease conditions encountered in pediatric patients, and can be categorized as congenital, inflammatory, traumatic, or tumorous conditions that involve the cranial nerve itself or propagation of the disorder from adjacent organs. However, determination of the normal course, as well as abnormalities, of cranial nerves in pediatric patients is challenging because of the small caliber of the cranial nerve, as well as the small intracranial and skull base structures. With the help of recently developed magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques that provide higher spatial resolution and fast imaging techniques including three-dimensional MR images with or without the use of gadolinium contrast agent, radiologists can more easily diagnose disease conditions that involve the small cranial nerves, such as the oculomotor, abducens, facial, and hypoglossal nerves, as well as normal radiologic anatomy, even in very young children...
July 2016: Radiographics: a Review Publication of the Radiological Society of North America, Inc
Natsuyo Yoshida-Hata, Naomichi Katai, Toshiyuki Oshitari
Purpose. To report the ocular findings in patients with hematopoietic malignancy with optic nerve involvement and abducens nerve palsy. Methods. The medical records of all cases of hematopoietic cancer with ophthalmic involvements seen in the Department of Ophthalmology of the National Center for Global Health and Medicine between 2009 and 2014 were reviewed. Results. Eight patients with hematopoietic cancer with optic nerve invasion or abducens nerve palsy were studied. The primary diseases were 3 cases of multiple myeloma, 1 case of acute lymphocytic leukemia, 1 case of follicular lymphoma, and 3 cases of AIDS-related lymphoma...
2016: Case Reports in Ophthalmological Medicine
Barış Adaklı, Enver Özgencil, Gülen Nevin Özünlü, Refiye Selin Aybar, Asuman Uysalel
Cranial nerve palsy (CNP) is a rare complication following lumbar puncture, which is a common procedure used most often for diagnostic and anaesthetic purposes. The sixth cranial (abducens) nerve is the most commonly affected cranial nerve. We report a case of unilateral sixth nerve palsy after spinal anaesthesia that improved immediately after an epidural blood patch (EBP).
June 2014: Turkish Journal of Anaesthesiology and Reanimation
Hee Kyung Yang, Jae Hyoung Kim, Jeong-Min Hwang
BACKGROUND: We have previously reported that the presence of the abducens nerve was variable in patients with type 3 Duane's retraction syndrome (DRS), being present in 2 of 5 eyes (40%) and absent in 3 (60%) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The previous study included only 5 eyes with unilateral DRS type 3. OBJECTIVES: To supplement existing scarce pathologic information by evaluating the presence of the abducens nerve using high resolution thin-section MRI system in a larger number of patients with DRS type 3, thus to provide further insight into the pathogenesis of DRS...
2016: PloS One
Christopher Elder, Clotilde Hainline, Steven L Galetta, Laura J Balcer, Janet C Rucker
Abducens nerve palsy is a common clinical finding in neurology practice. In many instances, the origin is obvious and management straightforward; however, the list of possible etiologies and mimics is vast and diverse and diagnostic decisions can be challenging and even controversial. This is especially true when the abducens nerve is affected in isolation, since in the current era of cost-effective medicine, it is critical to accurately diagnose etiologies that may lead to major morbidity or mortality with efficiency...
August 2016: Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports
André Beer-Furlan, Ralph Abi-Hachem, Ali O Jamshidi, Ricardo L Carrau, Daniel M Prevedello
Petroclival meningiomas are challenging lesions to manage independently of the selected surgical approach and are unique tumors in the type of pathological displacement of the surrounding anatomy. They also represent one of the most controversial entities with regard to approach selection, especially when deciding between an open versus endonasal route. When choosing an approach to the intradural portion of the petroclival region, the location of critical neurovascular structures relative to the lesion must be anticipated, including the abducens and trigeminal nerves...
December 2016: Journal of Neurosurgical Sciences
Ivana Budić, Dušan Šurdilović, Anđelka Slavković, Vesna Marjanović, Marija Stević, Dušica Simić
Moebius syndrome is a rare nonprogressive congenital neurological disorder with a wide range of severity and variability of symptoms. This diversity is a consequence of dysfunction of different cranial nerves (most often facial and abducens nerves), accompanying orofacial abnormalities, musculoskeletal malformations, congenital cardiac diseases, as well as specific associations of Moebius and other syndromes. The authors present anesthesia and airway management during the multiple tooth extraction surgery in a 10-year-old girl with Moebius syndrome associated with Poland and trigeminal trophic syndromes...
March 2016: Acta Clinica Croatica
Odoardo Picciolini, Matteo Porro, Elisa Cattaneo, Silvia Castelletti, Giuseppe Masera, Fabio Mosca, Maria Francesca Bedeschi
BACKGROUND: Moebius syndrome (MBS) is rare disease characterized by nonprogressive congenital uni- or bi-lateral facial (i. e. VII cranial nerve) and abducens (i. e. VI cranial nerve) palsy. Although the neurological and ophthalmological findings are quite well-known, data concerning the attendant functional difficulties and their changes over time are seldom addressed. In this study we attempt to estimate the prevalence of clinical and functional data in an Italian cohort affected by MBS...
2016: Italian Journal of Pediatrics
Aline Lariessy Campos Paiva, Guilherme Brasileiro de Aguiar, Vinicius Riccieri Ferraz, João Luiz Vitorino Araújo, Milton Hikaro Toita, José Carlos Esteves Veiga
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is less common in children than in adults. Posterior fossa lesions are even more uncommon, but, when present, are usually epidural hematomas. These lesions, even when small, may have a bad outcome because of the possibility of compression of the important structures that the infratentorial compartment contains, such as the brainstem and cranial nerves, and the constriction of the fourth ventricle, causing acute hydrocephalus. Although unusual, posterior fossa lesions are increasingly being diagnosed because of the better quality of and easier access to cranial tomography...
2016: Pediatric Neurosurgery
Jong G Park, Max A Tischfield, Alicia A Nugent, Long Cheng, Silvio Alessandro Di Gioia, Wai-Man Chan, Gail Maconachie, Thomas M Bosley, C Gail Summers, David G Hunter, Caroline D Robson, Irene Gottlob, Elizabeth C Engle
Duane retraction syndrome (DRS) is a congenital eye-movement disorder defined by limited outward gaze and retraction of the eye on attempted inward gaze. Here, we report on three heterozygous loss-of-function MAFB mutations causing DRS and a dominant-negative MAFB mutation causing DRS and deafness. Using genotype-phenotype correlations in humans and Mafb-knockout mice, we propose a threshold model for variable loss of MAFB function. Postmortem studies of DRS have reported abducens nerve hypoplasia and aberrant innervation of the lateral rectus muscle by the oculomotor nerve...
June 2, 2016: American Journal of Human Genetics
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