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household air pollution

Meng Qi, Xi Zhu, Wei Du, Yilin Chen, Yuanchen Chen, Tianbo Huang, Xuelian Pan, Qirui Zhong, Xu Sun, Eddy Y Zeng, Baoshan Xing, Shu Tao
Because people spend most of their time indoors, the characterization of indoor air quality is important for exposure assessment. Unfortunately, indoor air data are scarce, leading to a major data gap in risk assessment. In this study, PM2.5 concentrations in both indoor and outdoor air were simultaneously measured using on-line particulate counters in 13 households in Haidian, Beijing for both heating and non-heating seasons. A bimodal distribution of PM2.5 concentrations suggests rapid transitions between polluted and non-polluted situations...
October 18, 2016: Environmental Pollution
Thiago Hérick Sá, Ana Clara Duran, Marko Tainio, Carlos Augusto Monteiro, James Woodcock
The purpose of the study was to describe cyclists and cycling trips, and to explore correlates, time trends and health consequences of cycling in São Paulo, Brazil from 1997 to 2012. Cross-sectional analysis using repeated São Paulo Household Travel Surveys (HTS). At all time periods cycling was a minority travel mode in São Paulo (1174 people with cycling trips out of 214,719 people). Poisson regressions for individual correlates were estimated using the entire 2012 HTS sample. Men were six times more likely to cycle than women...
December 2016: Preventive Medicine Reports
Santosh Gaihre, Janet Kyle, Sean Semple, Jo Smith, Madhu Subedi, Debbi Marais
BACKGROUND: Although linkages have been found between agricultural interventions and nutritional health, and the development of clean fuels and improved solid fuel stoves in reducing household air pollution and adverse health effects, the extent of the potential of combined household interventions to improve health, nutrition and the environment has not been investigated. A systematic review was conducted to identify the extent and type of community-based agricultural and household interventions aimed at improving food security, health and the household environment in low and middle income countries...
October 18, 2016: BMC Public Health
Wei-Jie Guan, Xue-Yan Zheng, Kian Fan Chung, Nan-Shan Zhong
In China, where air pollution has become a major threat to public health, public awareness of the detrimental effects of air pollution on respiratory health is increasing-particularly in relation to haze days. Air pollutant emission levels in China remain substantially higher than are those in developed countries. Moreover, industry, traffic, and household biomass combustion have become major sources of air pollutant emissions, with substantial spatial and temporal variations. In this Review, we focus on the major constituents of air pollutants and their impacts on chronic respiratory diseases...
October 15, 2016: Lancet
(no author information available yet)
BACKGROUND: The Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2015 provides an up-to-date synthesis of the evidence for risk factor exposure and the attributable burden of disease. By providing national and subnational assessments spanning the past 25 years, this study can inform debates on the importance of addressing risks in context. METHODS: We used the comparative risk assessment framework developed for previous iterations of the Global Burden of Disease Study to estimate attributable deaths, disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs), and trends in exposure by age group, sex, year, and geography for 79 behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks or clusters of risks from 1990 to 2015...
October 8, 2016: Lancet
S R C Howie, J Schellenberg, O Chimah, R C Ideh, B E Ebruke, C Oluwalana, G Mackenzie, M Jallow, M Njie, S Donkor, K L Dionisio, G Goldberg, K Fornace, C Bottomley, P C Hill, C C Grant, T Corrah, A M Prentice, M Ezzati, B M Greenwood, P G Smith, R A Adegbola, K Mulholland
SETTING: Greater Banjul and Upper River Regions, The Gambia. OBJECTIVE: To investigate tractable social, environmental and nutritional risk factors for childhood pneumonia. DESIGN: A case-control study examining the association of crowding, household air pollution (HAP) and nutritional factors with pneumonia was undertaken in children aged 2-59 months: 458 children with severe pneumonia, defined according to the modified WHO criteria, were compared with 322 children with non-severe pneumonia, and these groups were compared to 801 neighbourhood controls...
October 2016: International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease
Steve Hankey, Greg Lindsey, Julian D Marshall
BACKGROUND: Providing infrastructure and land uses to encourage active travel (i.e., bicycling and walking) are promising strategies for designing health-promoting cities. Population-level exposure to air pollution during active travel is understudied. OBJECTIVES: To (1) investigate population-level patterns in exposure during active travel, based on spatial estimates of bicycle traffic, pedestrian traffic, and particulate concentrations; and, (2) assess how those exposure patterns are associated with the built environment...
October 7, 2016: Environmental Health Perspectives
S E Bartington, I Bakolis, D Devakumar, O P Kurmi, J Gulliver, G Chaube, D S Manandhar, N M Saville, A Costello, D Osrin, A L Hansell, J G Ayres
Household Air Pollution (HAP) from biomass cooking fuels is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in low-income settings worldwide. In Nepal the use of open stoves with solid biomass fuels is the primary method of domestic cooking. To assess patterns of domestic air pollution we performed continuous measurement of carbon monoxide (CO) and particulate Matter (PM2.5) in 12 biomass fuel households in Janakpur, Nepal. We measured kitchen PM2.5 and CO concentrations at one-minute intervals for an approximately 48-h period using the TSI DustTrak II 8530/SidePak AM510 (TSI Inc, St...
October 1, 2016: Environmental Pollution
Pierre Hennebert, Ismahen Samaali, Pauline Molina
A stepwise method for assessment of the HP 12 is proposed and tested with 49 waste samples. The hazard property HP 12 is defined as "Release of an acute toxic gas": waste which releases acute toxic gases (Acute Tox. 1, 2 or 3) in contact with water or an acid. When a waste contains a substance assigned to one of the following supplemental hazards EUH029, EUH031 and EUH032, it shall be classified as hazardous by HP 12 according to test methods or guidelines (EC, 2014a, 2014b). When the substances with the cited hazard statement codes react with water or an acid, they can release HCl, Cl2, HF, HCN, PH3, H2S, SO2 (and two other gases very unlikely to be emitted, hydrazoic acid HN3 and selenium oxide SeO2 - a solid with low vapor pressure)...
September 26, 2016: Waste Management
Zheng Li, Adwoa Commodore, Stella Hartinger, Michael Lewin, Andreas Sjödin, Erin Pittman, Debra Trinidad, Kendra Hubbard, Claudio F Lanata, Ana I Gil, Daniel Mäusezahl, Luke P Naeher
BACKGROUND: Household air pollution (HAP) from indoor biomass stoves contains harmful pollutants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and is a leading risk factor for global disease burden. We used biomonitoring to assess HAP exposure and association with self-reported symptoms in 334 non-smoking Peruvian women to evaluate the efficacy of a stove intervention program. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study within the framework of a community randomized control trial...
September 24, 2016: Environment International
Nadeem Ali, Iqbal Mohammad Ibrahim Ismail, Mamdouh Khoder, Magdy Shamy, Mansour Alghamdi, Max Costa, Lulwa Naseer Ali, Wei Wang, Syed Ali Musstjab Akber Shah Eqani
This study reports levels and profiles of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in dust samples collected from three different microenvironments (cars, air conditioner (AC) filters and household floor dust) of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia (KSA) and Kuwait. To the best of our knowledge, this is first study reporting PAHs in indoor microenvironments of KSA, which makes these findings important. Benzo(b)fluoranthene (BbF), benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), phenanthrene (Phe), and pyrene (Pyr) were found to be the major chemicals in dust samples from all selected microenvironments...
September 24, 2016: Science of the Total Environment
L Novack, M Yitshak-Sade, D Landau, I Kloog, B Sarov, I Karakis
It has been established that ambient air pollution (AAP) has an adverse effect on human health. The pathophysiological mechanism of this impact is likely to be related to the oxidative stress. In the current study we estimate the association between AAP and cell proliferation (CP) of umbilical cord blood cells, representing maternal organism most proximal to the fetal body. Blood samples were tested for proliferation in 292 enrolled Arab-Bedouin women at delivery (July 2012-March 2013). The estimates of AAP were defined by a hybrid satellite based model predicting both PM2...
September 21, 2016: Environmental Research
Ashraful Alam, Nanda Tawale, Archana Patel, Michael J Dibley, Sunil Jadhao, Camille Raynes-Greenow
Exposure to household air pollution is estimated to be the 3rd largest contributor to the global burden of disease and the largest contributor in South Asia. Unacceptability of improved cook stoves by the intended user has been identified as a crucial factor hindering uptake and sustained use. We conducted a qualitative study to understand the socio-cultural factors that influence acceptance of improved cookstoves and conducted a systematic field trial in two rural villages in Maharashtra, India. The qualitative study used semi-structured in-depth interviews and focus group discussions...
2016: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Jeevan Lal Matawle, Shamsh Pervez, Anjali Shrivastava, Suresh Tiwari, Pallavi Pant, Manas Kanti Deb, Diwan Singh Bisht, Yasmeen F Pervez
PM2.5 concentrations were measured in residential indoor environment in slums of central India during 2012-2013. In addition, a suite of chemical components including metals (Al, K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Pb, Mo, Se, Sb, Na, Mg, K and Hg), ions (Na(+), Mg(2+), K(+), Ca(2+), F(-), Cl(-), NH4 (+), NO3 (-) and SO4 (2-)) and carbon (OC and EC) were analyzed for all samples. Indoor PM2.5 concentrations were found to be several folds higher than the 24-h national ambient air quality standard (60 µg/m(3)) for PM2...
September 10, 2016: Environmental Geochemistry and Health
Hind Sbihi, Mieke Koehoorn, Lillian Tamburic, Michael Brauer
RATIONALE: The heterogeneity of asthma phenotypes may explain inconsistencies in observed associations with environmental exposures. AIM: To identify trajectories of childhood asthma and to characterize the potential impact of residential greenness and air pollution on asthma trajectory sub-groups. DATA AND METHODS: Linked administrative databases of medical visits were used to define the occurrence and recurrence of asthma over a 10-year follow-up period within a population-based birth cohort of over 65,000 children...
September 8, 2016: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Sneha Gautam, Ankit Yadav, Chuen-Jinn Tsai, Prashant Kumar
Natural and human activities generate a significant amount of PM2.5 (particles ≤2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter) into the surrounding atmospheric environments. Because of their small size, they can remain suspended for a relatively longer time in the air than coarse particles and thus can travel long distances in the atmosphere. PM2.5 is one of the key indicators of pollution and known to cause numerous types of respiratory and lung-related diseases. Due to poor implementation of regulations and a time lag in introducing the vehicle technology, levels of PM2...
August 31, 2016: Environmental Science and Pollution Research International
Sarah J Capistrano, Razia Zakarya, Hui Chen, Brian G Oliver
Biomass smoke is one of the major air pollutants and contributors of household air pollution worldwide. More than 3 billion people use biomass fuels for cooking and heating, while other sources of exposure are from the occurrence of bushfires and occupational conditions. Persistent biomass smoke exposure has been associated with acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI) as a major environmental risk factor. Children under the age of five years are the most susceptible in developing severe ALRI, which accounts for 940,000 deaths globally...
2016: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Michael J Phillips, Emily A Smith, Paul L Mosquin, Ryan Chartier, Sumal Nandasena, Katherine Bronstein, Myles F Elledge, Vanessa Thornburg, Jonathan Thornburg, Linda M Brown
A pilot study of indoor air pollution produced by biomass cookstoves was conducted in 53 homes in Sri Lanka to assess respiratory conditions associated with stove type ("Anagi" or "Traditional"), kitchen characteristics (e.g., presence of a chimney in the home, indoor cooking area), and concentrations of personal and indoor particulate matter less than 2.5 micrometers in diameter (PM2.5). Each primary cook reported respiratory conditions for herself (cough, phlegm, wheeze, or asthma) and for children (wheeze or asthma) living in her household...
2016: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Peng Nie, Alfonso Sousa-Poza, Jianhong Xue
BACKGROUND: There is evidence that household air pollution is associated with poor health in China, and that this form of air pollution may even be more of a health concern in China than the much-publicized outdoor air pollution. However, there is little empirical evidence on the relationship between household air pollution and health in China based on nationally representative and longitudinal data. This study examines the association between the type of domestic cooking fuel and the health of women aged ≥16 in rural China...
2016: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Jamie Rylance, Anstead Kankwatira, David E Nelson, Evelyn Toh, Richard B Day, Huaiying Lin, Xiang Gao, Qunfeng Dong, Erica Sodergren, George M Weinstock, Robert S Heyderman, Homer L Twigg, Stephen B Gordon
BACKGROUND: Domestic combustion of biomass fuels, such as wood, charcoal, crop residue and dung causes Household Air Pollution (HAP). These inhaled particulates affect more than half of the world's population, causing respiratory problems such as infection and inflammatory lung disease. We examined whether the presence of black carbon in alveolar macrophages was associated with alterations in the lung microbiome in a Malawi population. METHODS: Bronchoalveolar lavage samples from 44 healthy adults were sequenced using 16S rDNA amplification to assess microbial diversity, richness and relative taxa abundance...
2016: BMC Microbiology
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