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Human gut microbiome

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28545829/gut-microbiota-and-hepatitis-b-virus-induced-chronic-liver-disease-implications-for-faecal-microbiota-transplantation-therapy
#1
REVIEW
Y Kang, Y Cai
Hepatitis B is one of the most common infectious diseases globally. It has been estimated that there are 350 million chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) carriers worldwide. The liver is connected to the small intestine by the bile duct, which carries bile formed in the liver to the intestine. Nearly all of the blood that leaves the stomach and intestines must pass through the liver. Human intestines contain a wide diversity of microbes, collectively termed the 'gut microbiota'. Gut microbiota play a significant role in host metabolic processes and host immune modulation, and influence host development and physiology (organ development)...
April 15, 2017: Journal of Hospital Infection
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28540921/the-path-towards-microbiome-based-metabolite-treatment
#2
Jotham Suez, Eran Elinav
The increasing evidence pointing towards the involvement of the gut microbiome in multiple diseases, as well as its plasticity, renders it a desirable potential therapeutic target. Nevertheless, classical therapies based on the consumption of live probiotic bacteria, or their enrichment by prebiotics, exhibit limited efficacy. Recently, a novel therapeutic approach has been suggested based on metabolites secreted, modulated or degraded by the microbiome. As many of the host-microorganism interactions pertaining to human health are mediated by metabolites, this approach may be able to provide therapeutic efficacy while overcoming caveats of current microbiome-targeting therapies, such as colonization resistance and inter-individual variation in microbial composition...
May 25, 2017: Nature Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28540051/faecal-microbiota-transplantation-where-did-it-start-what-have-studies-taught-us-where-is-it-going
#3
REVIEW
Ryan M Chanyi, Laura Craven, Brandon Harvey, Gregor Reid, Michael J Silverman, Jeremy P Burton
The composition and activity of microorganisms in the gut, the microbiome, is emerging as an important factor to consider with regard to the treatment of many diseases. Dysbiosis of the normal community has been implicated in inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn's disease, diabetes and, most notoriously, Clostridium difficile infection. In Canada, the leading treatment strategy for recalcitrant C. difficile infection is to receive faecal material which by nature is filled with microorganisms and their metabolites, from a healthy individual, known as a faecal microbiota transplantation...
2017: SAGE Open Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28533691/microbiome-disruption-and-recovery-in-the-fish-gambusia-affinis-following-exposure-to-broad-spectrum-antibiotic
#4
Jeanette M Carlson, Annie B Leonard, Embriette R Hyde, Joseph F Petrosino, Todd P Primm
Antibiotics are a relatively common disturbance to the normal microbiota of humans and agricultural animals, sometimes resulting in severe side effects such as antibiotic-associated enterocolitis. Gambusia affinis was used as a vertebrate model for effects of a broad-spectrum antibiotic, rifampicin, on the skin and gut mucosal microbiomes. The fish were exposed to the antibiotic in the water column for 1 week, and then monitored during recovery. As observed via culture, viable counts from the skin microbiome dropped strongly yet returned to pretreatment levels by 1...
2017: Infection and Drug Resistance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28529325/anticancer-effects-of-the-microbiome-and-its-products
#5
REVIEW
Laurence Zitvogel, Romain Daillère, María Paula Roberti, Bertrand Routy, Guido Kroemer
The human gut microbiome modulates many host processes, including metabolism, inflammation, and immune and cellular responses. It is becoming increasingly apparent that the microbiome can also influence the development of cancer. In preclinical models, the host response to cancer treatment has been improved by modulating the gut microbiome; this is known to have an altered composition in many diseases, including cancer. In addition, cancer treatment with microbial agents or their products has the potential to shrink tumours...
May 22, 2017: Nature Reviews. Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28527946/the-microbiome-and-hepatobiliary-pancreatic-cancers
#6
Kosuke Mima, Shigeki Nakagawa, Hiroshi Sawayama, Takatsugu Ishimoto, Katsunori Imai, Masaaki Iwatsuki, Daisuke Hashimoto, Yoshifumi Baba, Yo-Ichi Yamashita, Naoya Yoshida, Akira Chikamoto, Hideo Baba
The human intestinal microbiome encompasses at least 100 trillion microorganisms that can influence host immunity and disease conditions, including cancer. Hepatobiliary and pancreatic cancers have been associated with poor prognosis owing to their high level of tumor invasiveness, distant metastasis, and resistance to conventional treatment options, such as chemotherapy. Accumulating evidence from animal models suggests that specific microbes and microbial dysbiosis can potentiate hepatobiliary-pancreatic tumor development by damaging DNA, activating oncogenic signaling pathways, and producing tumor-promoting metabolites...
May 17, 2017: Cancer Letters
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28526852/health-benefit-of-vegetable-fruit-juice-based-diet-role-of-microbiome
#7
Susanne M Henning, Jieping Yang, Paul Shao, Ru-Po Lee, Jianjun Huang, Austin Ly, Mark Hsu, Qing-Yi Lu, Gail Thames, David Heber, Zhaoping Li
The gut microbiota is an important contributor to human health. Vegetable/fruit juices provide polyphenols, oligosaccharides, fiber and nitrate (beet juice), which may induce a prebiotic-like effect. Juice-based diets are becoming popular. However, there is a lack of scientific evidence of their health benefits. It was our hypothesis that changes in the intestinal microbiota induced by a juice-based diet play an important role in their health benefits. Twenty healthy adults consumed only vegetable/fruit juices for 3 days followed by 14 days of customary diet...
May 19, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28526488/-targeting-the-gut-liver-axis-in-liver-disease
#8
REVIEW
Reiner Wiest, Agustin Albillos, Michael Trauner, Jashmohan Bajaj, Rajiv Jalan
The gut is open to the outer environment, harbours the microbiome containing several fold more genetic material than the human genome and produces a myriad of metabolites as well as hormones/peptides. The liver is at the nexus between this vast source of nutrients, toxins and hormones and the remaining human body. Not surprisingly, this liver-gut-axis has hence, been demonstrated in experimental models and in-vitro systems to contribute to the pathogenesis of most liver diseases such as alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), -steatohepatitis (NASH), cholestatic liver diseases, hepatocellular carcinoma, acute-on-chronic liver failure, progression to fibrosis/cirrhosis and complications of cirrhosis...
May 16, 2017: Journal of Hepatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28522363/a-bloodstream-infection-by-ruminococcus-gnavus-in-a-patient-with-a-gall-bladder-perforation
#9
Young Jin Kim, Hee Yoon Kang, Yujin Han, Mi Suk Lee, Hee Joo Lee
Ruminococcus gnavus is frequently found among human gut microbiome. However, human bloodstream infections by R. gnavus have been reported only three times. Clinical details were lacking for one case; the other two cases with concurrent bacteremia in patients with diverticulitis. We report a case of R. gnavus bloodstream infection in a patient with a gall bladder perforation suggesting its association with damage to the gastrointestinal tract. R. gnavus was misidentified using biochemical test but 16S rRNA sequencing and Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry were useful for correct identification...
May 15, 2017: Anaerobe
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28520993/effects-of-short-and-long-course-antibiotics-on-the-lower-intestinal-microbiome-as-they-relate-to-traveller-s-diarrhea
#10
Lawrence Clifford McDonald
BACKGROUND: Antibiotics have profound and lasting effects on the lower intestinal (gut) microbiome that can both promote resistance and increase susceptibility to colonization and infection; knowledge of these changes is important to the prevention and treatment of traveler's diarrhea. METHODS: Recent data from epidemiologic and modern metagenomics studies were reviewed in regard to how such findings could inform the prevention and treatment of traveler's diarrhea...
April 1, 2017: Journal of Travel Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28513546/edible-plants-and-their-influence-on-the-gut-microbiome-and-acne
#11
REVIEW
Ashley K Clark, Kelly N Haas, Raja K Sivamani
Acne vulgaris affects most people at some point in their lives. Due to unclear etiology, likely with multiple factors, targeted and low-risk treatments have yet to be developed. In this review, we explore the multiple causes of acne and how plant-based foods and supplements can control these. The proposed causative factors include insulin resistance, sex hormone imbalances, inflammation and microbial dysbiosis. There is an emerging body of work on the human gut microbiome and how it mediates feedback between the foods we eat and our bodies...
May 17, 2017: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28512451/colonization-and-succession-within-the-human-gut-microbiome-by-archaea-bacteria-and-microeukaryotes-during-the-first-year-of-life
#12
Linda Wampach, Anna Heintz-Buschart, Angela Hogan, Emilie E L Muller, Shaman Narayanasamy, Cedric C Laczny, Luisa W Hugerth, Lutz Bindl, Jean Bottu, Anders F Andersson, Carine de Beaufort, Paul Wilmes
Perturbations to the colonization process of the human gastrointestinal tract have been suggested to result in adverse health effects later in life. Although much research has been performed on bacterial colonization and succession, much less is known about the other two domains of life, archaea, and eukaryotes. Here we describe colonization and succession by bacteria, archaea and microeukaryotes during the first year of life (samples collected around days 1, 3, 5, 28, 150, and 365) within the gastrointestinal tract of infants delivered either vaginally or by cesarean section and using a combination of quantitative real-time PCR as well as 16S and 18S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing...
2017: Frontiers in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28507320/the-microbiome-regulates-amygdala-dependent-fear-recall
#13
A E Hoban, R M Stilling, G Moloney, F Shanahan, T G Dinan, G Clarke, J F Cryan
The amygdala is a key brain region that is critically involved in the processing and expression of anxiety and fear-related signals. In parallel, a growing number of preclinical and human studies have implicated the microbiome-gut-brain in regulating anxiety and stress-related responses. However, the role of the microbiome in fear-related behaviours is unclear. To this end we investigated the importance of the host microbiome on amygdala-dependent behavioural readouts using the cued fear conditioning paradigm...
May 16, 2017: Molecular Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28506279/uncovering-the-trimethylamine-producing-bacteria-of-the-human-gut-microbiota
#14
Silke Rath, Benjamin Heidrich, Dietmar H Pieper, Marius Vital
BACKGROUND: Trimethylamine (TMA), produced by the gut microbiota from dietary quaternary amines (mainly choline and carnitine), is associated with atherosclerosis and severe cardiovascular disease. Currently, little information on the composition of TMA producers in the gut is available due to their low abundance and the requirement of specific functional-based detection methods as many taxa show disparate abilities to produce that compound. RESULTS: In order to examine the TMA-forming potential of microbial communities, we established databases for the key genes of the main TMA-synthesis pathways, encoding choline TMA-lyase (cutC) and carnitine oxygenase (cntA), using a multi-level screening approach on 67,134 genomes revealing 1107 and 6738 candidates to exhibit cutC and cntA, respectively...
May 15, 2017: Microbiome
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28503071/the-ecological-community-of-commensal-symbiotic-and-pathogenic-gastrointestinal-microorganisms-an-appraisal
#15
REVIEW
Seraj Zohurul Haque, Mainul Haque
The human gastrointestinal tract is inhabited by a vast population of bacteria, numbering ~100 trillion. These microorganisms have been shown to play a significant role in digestion, metabolism, and the immune system. The aim of this study was to review and discuss how the human body interacts with its gut microbiome and in turn the effects that the microorganisms have on its host, overall resulting in a true mutualistic relationship.
2017: Clinical and Experimental Gastroenterology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28497768/antibacterial-effects-of-antiretrovirals-potential-implications-for-microbiome-studies-in-hiv
#16
Mohaned Shilaih, Daniel C Angst, Alex Marzel, Sebastian Bonhoeffer, Huldrych F Günthard, Roger D Kouyos
BACKGROUND: Despite being used by more than 18 million people our understanding of the extent of effects of antiretrovirals on the human body and other organisms remains incomplete. In addition, the direct effect of antiretrovirals on the gut microbiota of HIV infected individuals has been largely overlooked in microbiome studies concerned with HIV infected individuals. METHODS: Here we tested 25 antiretrovirals on Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli using a broth microdilution assay to assess whether these drugs have an antibacterial effect...
May 12, 2017: Antiviral Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28497760/the-intestinal-microbiome-and-paediatric-liver-disease
#17
REVIEW
Daniel H Leung, Dean Yimlamai
The intestinal microbiome has been the intense focus of recent study, but how the microbiota affects connected organs, such as the liver, has not been fully elucidated. The microbiome regulates intestinal permeability and helps to metabolise the human diet into small molecules, thus directly affecting liver health. Several studies have linked intestinal dysbiosis to the severity and progression of liver diseases, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, total parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease, and cystic fibrosis-associated liver disease...
June 2017: Lancet. Gastroenterology & Hepatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28497122/the-microbiome-mitochondrion-connection-common-ancestries-common-mechanisms-common-goals
#18
Alfredo Franco-Obregón, Jack A Gilbert
Lynn Margulis in the 1960s elegantly proposed a shared phylogenetic history between bacteria and mitochondria; this relationship has since become a cornerstone of modern cellular biology. Yet, an interesting facet of the interaction between the microbiome and mitochondria has been mostly ignored, that of the systems biology relationship that underpins host health and longevity. The mitochondria are descendants of primordial aerobic pleomorphic bacteria (likely genus Rickettsia) that entered (literally and functionally) into a mutualistic partnership with ancient anaerobic microbes (likely Archaea)...
May 2017: MSystems
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28489816/endothelial-tlr4-and-the-microbiome-drive-cerebral-cavernous-malformations
#19
Alan T Tang, Jaesung P Choi, Jonathan J Kotzin, Yiqing Yang, Courtney C Hong, Nicholas Hobson, Romuald Girard, Hussein A Zeineddine, Rhonda Lightle, Thomas Moore, Ying Cao, Robert Shenkar, Mei Chen, Patricia Mericko, Jisheng Yang, Li Li, Ceylan Tanes, Dmytro Kobuley, Urmo Võsa, Kevin J Whitehead, Dean Y Li, Lude Franke, Blaine Hart, Markus Schwaninger, Jorge Henao-Mejia, Leslie Morrison, Helen Kim, Issam A Awad, Xiangjian Zheng, Mark L Kahn
Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are a cause of stroke and seizure for which no effective medical therapies yet exist. CCMs arise from the loss of an adaptor complex that negatively regulates MEKK3-KLF2/4 signalling in brain endothelial cells, but upstream activators of this disease pathway have yet to be identified. Here we identify endothelial Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and the gut microbiome as critical stimulants of CCM formation. Activation of TLR4 by Gram-negative bacteria or lipopolysaccharide accelerates CCM formation, and genetic or pharmacologic blockade of TLR4 signalling prevents CCM formation in mice...
May 10, 2017: Nature
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28489672/starved-guts-morphologic-and-functional-intestinal-changes-in-malnutrition
#20
Suzanna Attia, Marjon Feenstra, Nathan Swain, Melina Cuesta, Robert Bandsma
Malnutrition contributes significantly to death and illness worldwide and especially to the deaths of children less than five years of age. The relation between intestinal changes in malnutrition and morbidity and mortality has not been well characterized; however, recent research indicates that the functional and morphologic changes of the intestine secondary to malnutrition itself contribute significantly to these negative clinical outcomes and may be potent targets of intervention. The aim of this review was to summarize current knowledge of experimental and clinically observed changes in the intestine from malnutrition pre-clinical models and human studies...
May 9, 2017: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition
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