keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Human gut microbiome

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29164717/antibiotics-reduce-genetic-diversity-of-core-species-in-the-honeybee-gut-microbiome
#1
Kasie Raymann, Louis-Marie Bobay, Nancy A Moran
The gut microbiome plays a key role in animal health, and perturbing it can have detrimental effects. One major source of perturbation to microbiomes, in humans and human-associated animals, is exposure to antibiotics. Most studies of how antibiotics affect the microbiome have used amplicon sequencing of highly conserved 16S rRNA sequences, as in a recent study showing that antibiotic treatment severely alters the species-level composition of the honeybee gut microbiome. But because the standard 16S rRNA-based methods cannot resolve closely related strains, strain-level changes could not be evaluated...
November 22, 2017: Molecular Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29163472/the-kynurenine-pathway-as-a-novel-link-between-allergy-and-the-gut-microbiome
#2
REVIEW
Aaron P Van der Leek, Yarden Yanishevsky, Anita L Kozyrskyj
In the past few decades, the indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) subset of the kynurenine (KYN) pathway of tryptophan (TRP) metabolism has been the subject of much research in the area of immune tolerance. In this review, we aim to incorporate new findings on this pathway in relation to allergy and the gut microbiome, while providing a comprehensive overview of the pathway itself. Stimulated by interferon gamma, IDO acts as a tolerogenic, immunosuppressive enzyme to attenuate allergic responses by the induction of the KYN-IDO pathway, resultant depletion of TRP, and elevation in KYN metabolites...
2017: Frontiers in Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29163445/in-silico-analysis-of-putrefaction-pathways-in-bacteria-and-its-implication-in-colorectal-cancer
#3
Harrisham Kaur, Chandrani Das, Sharmila S Mande
Fermentation of undigested proteins in human gastrointestinal tract (gut) by the resident microbiota, a process called bacterial putrefaction, can sometimes disrupt the gut homeostasis. In this process, essential amino acids (e.g., histidine, tryptophan, etc.) that are required by the host may be utilized by the gut microbes. In addition, some of the products of putrefaction, like ammonia, putrescine, cresol, indole, phenol, etc., have been implicated in the disease pathogenesis of colorectal cancer (CRC). We have investigated bacterial putrefaction pathways that are known to be associated with such metabolites...
2017: Frontiers in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29162937/spontaneous-body-contractions-are-modulated-by-the-microbiome-of-hydra
#4
Andrea P Murillo-Rincon, Alexander Klimovich, Eileen Pemöller, Jan Taubenheim, Benedikt Mortzfeld, René Augustin, Thomas C G Bosch
Spontaneous contractile activity, such as gut peristalsis, is ubiquitous in animals and is driven by pacemaker cells. In humans, disruption of the contraction pattern leads to gastrointestinal conditions, which are also associated with gut microbiota dysbiosis. Spontaneous contractile activity is also present in animals lacking gastrointestinal tract. Here we show that spontaneous body contractions in Hydra are modulated by symbiotic bacteria. Germ-free animals display strongly reduced and less regular contraction frequencies...
November 21, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29161088/mechanistic-basis-for-obesity-related-increases-in-ozone-induced-airway-hyperresponsiveness-in-mice
#5
Stephanie A Shore
Obesity is a risk factor for asthma, especially nonallergic asthma. Ozone, a common air pollutant, is a nonallergic asthma trigger. Importantly, ozone-induced decrements in lung function are greater in obese and overweight human subjects than in lean individuals. Obese mice also exhibit exaggerated pulmonary responses to ozone. Ozone causes greater increases in pulmonary resistance, in bronchoalveolar lavage neutrophils, and in airway hyperresponsiveness in obese than in lean mice. Our data indicate that IL-33 plays a role in mediating these events...
November 2017: Annals of the American Thoracic Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29160065/transformation-of-the-anticancer-drug-doxorubicin-in-the-human-gut-microbiome
#6
Austin Yan, Elizabeth Culp, Julie Perry, Jennifer Lau, Lesley MacNeil, Michael G Surette, Gerard D Wright
Bacteria living in the human gut are implicated in the etiology of several diseases. Moreover, dozens of drugs are metabolized by elements of the gut microbiome, which may have further implications for human health. Here we screened a collection of primary gut isolates for their ability to inactivate the widely used antineoplastic drug doxorubicin and identified a strain of Raoultella planticola as a potent inactivator under anaerobic conditions. We demonstrate that R. planticola deglycosylates doxorubicin to metabolites 7-deoxydoxorubicinol and 7-deoxydoxorubicinolone via a reductive deglycosylation mechanism...
November 21, 2017: ACS Infectious Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29159583/the-association-between-artificial-sweeteners-and-obesity
#7
REVIEW
Michelle Pearlman, Jon Obert, Lisa Casey
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this paper is to review the epidemiology of obesity and the evolution of artificial sweeteners; to examine the latest research on the effects of artificial sweeteners on the host microbiome, the gut-brain axis, glucose homeostasis, and energy consumption; and to discuss how all of these changes ultimately contribute to obesity. RECENT FINDINGS: Although artificial sweeteners were developed as a sugar substitute to help reduce insulin resistance and obesity, data in both animal models and humans suggest that the effects of artificial sweeteners may contribute to metabolic syndrome and the obesity epidemic...
November 21, 2017: Current Gastroenterology Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29158969/5-fluorouracil-and-irinotecan-sn-38-have-limited-impact-on-colon-microbial-functionality-and-composition-in-vitro
#8
Eline Vanlancker, Barbara Vanhoecke, Andrea Stringer, Tom Van de Wiele
Gastrointestinal mucositis is a debilitating side effect of chemotherapy treatment, with currently no treatment available. As changes in microbial composition have been reported upon chemotherapy treatment in vivo, it is thought that gut microbiota dysbiosis contribute to the mucositis etiology. Yet it is not known whether chemotherapeutics directly cause microbial dysbiosis, thereby increasing mucositis risk, or whether the chemotherapeutic subjected host environment disturbs the microbiome thereby aggravating the disease...
2017: PeerJ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29155236/evaluation-of-sampling-and-storage-procedures-on-preserving-the-community-structure-of-stool-microbiota-a-simple-at-home-toilet-paper-collection-method
#9
Kait F Al, Jordan E Bisanz, Greg B Gloor, Gregor Reid, Jeremy P Burton
BACKGROUND: The increasing interest on the impact of the gut microbiota on health and disease has resulted in multiple human microbiome-related studies emerging. However, multiple sampling methods are being used, making cross-comparison of results difficult. To avoid additional clinic visits and increase patient recruitment to these studies, there is the potential to utilize at-home stool sampling. The aim of this pilot study was to compare simple self-sampling collection and storage methods...
November 16, 2017: Journal of Microbiological Methods
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29152585/total-lipopolysaccharide-from-the-human-gut-microbiome-silences-toll-like-receptor-signaling
#10
Eva d'Hennezel, Sahar Abubucker, Leon O Murphy, Thomas W Cullen
Cohabitation of microbial communities with the host enables the formation of a symbiotic relationship that maintains homeostasis in the gut and beyond. One prevailing model suggests that this relationship relies on the capacity of host cells and tissues to remain tolerant to the strong immune stimulation generated by the microbiota such as the activation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) pathways by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Indeed, gut microbial LPS is thought to be one of the most potent activators of innate immune signaling and an important mediator of the microbiome's influence on host physiology...
November 2017: MSystems
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29152318/gut-microbiota-composition-may-relate-to-weight-loss-rate-in-obese-pet-dogs
#11
Ida N Kieler, Shamrulazhar Shamzir Kamal, Anne D Vitger, Dennis S Nielsen, Charlotte Lauridsen, Charlotte R Bjornvad
Obese dogs seem to have a different gut microbiome (GM) composition compared to lean dogs, and in humans, GM composition may negatively impact the ability to lose weight in some individuals. The purpose of this study was to investigate the interaction between exercise, weight-loss and the composition of GM in dogs. Eighteen obese pet dogs were recruited for a 12-week weight-loss intervention. All dogs were fed restrictively with a commercial high-protein/high-fibre dry diet, and eight of these dogs were enrolled in an exercise program in addition to the diet intervention...
November 2017: Veterinary Medicine and Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29151351/immucillins-in-infectious-diseases
#12
Gary B Evans, Peter C Tyler, Vern L Schramm
Transition state theory proposes that stable chemical mimics of enzymatic transition states will be powerful inhibitors of their cognate enzymes. The Immucillins are chemically stable analogues that mimic the ribocation and leaving-group features of N-ribosyltransferase transition states. Infectious disease agents often rely on ribosyltransferase chemistry in pathways involving precursor synthesis for nucleic acids, salvage of nucleic acid precursors from the host or synthetic pathways with nucleoside intermediates...
November 19, 2017: ACS Infectious Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29147991/the-role-of-the-gut-microbiome-in-multiple-sclerosis-risk-and-progression-towards-characterization-of-the-ms-microbiome
#13
REVIEW
Anne-Katrin Pröbstel, Sergio E Baranzini
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the prototypic complex disease, in which both genes and the environment contribute to its pathogenesis. To date, > 200 independent loci across the genome have been associated with MS risk. However, these only explain a fraction of the total phenotypic variance, suggesting the possible presence of additional genetic factors, and, most likely, also environmental factors. New DNA sequencing technologies have enabled the sequencing of all kinds of microorganisms, including those living in and around humans (i...
November 16, 2017: Neurotherapeutics: the Journal of the American Society for Experimental NeuroTherapeutics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29145891/the-inuit-gut-microbiome-is-dynamic-over-time-and-shaped-by-traditional-foods
#14
Geneviève Dubois, Catherine Girard, François-Joseph Lapointe, B Jesse Shapiro
BACKGROUND: The human gut microbiome represents a diverse microbial community that varies across individuals and populations, and is influenced by factors such as host genetics and lifestyle. Diet is a major force shaping the gut microbiome, and the effects of dietary choices on microbiome composition are well documented. However, it remains poorly known how natural temporal variation in diet can affect the microbiome. The traditional Inuit diet is primarily based on animal products, which are thought to vary seasonally according to prey availability...
November 16, 2017: Microbiome
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29143823/salt-responsive-gut-commensal-modulates-th17-axis-and-disease
#15
Nicola Wilck, Mariana G Matus, Sean M Kearney, Scott W Olesen, Kristoffer Forslund, Hendrik Bartolomaeus, Stefanie Haase, Anja Mähler, András Balogh, Lajos Markó, Olga Vvedenskaya, Friedrich H Kleiner, Dmitry Tsvetkov, Lars Klug, Paul I Costea, Shinichi Sunagawa, Lisa Maier, Natalia Rakova, Valentin Schatz, Patrick Neubert, Christian Frätzer, Alexander Krannich, Maik Gollasch, Diana A Grohme, Beatriz F Côrte-Real, Roman G Gerlach, Marijana Basic, Athanasios Typas, Chuan Wu, Jens M Titze, Jonathan Jantsch, Michael Boschmann, Ralf Dechend, Markus Kleinewietfeld, Stefan Kempa, Peer Bork, Ralf A Linker, Eric J Alm, Dominik N Müller
A Western lifestyle with high salt consumption can lead to hypertension and cardiovascular disease. High salt may additionally drive autoimmunity by inducing T helper 17 (TH17) cells, which can also contribute to hypertension. Induction of TH17 cells depends on gut microbiota; however, the effect of salt on the gut microbiome is unknown. Here we show that high salt intake affects the gut microbiome in mice, particularly by depleting Lactobacillus murinus. Consequently, treatment of mice with L. murinus prevented salt-induced aggravation of actively induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and salt-sensitive hypertension by modulating TH17 cells...
November 15, 2017: Nature
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29141969/cardiovascular-and-antiobesity-effects-of-resveratrol-mediated-through-the-gut-microbiota
#16
REVIEW
Julia K Bird, Daniel Raederstorff, Peter Weber, Robert E Steinert
Encouraging scientific research into the health effects of dietary bioactive resveratrol has been confounded by its rapid first-pass metabolism, which leads to low in vivo bioavailability. Preliminary studies have shown that resveratrol can modulate gut microbiota composition, undergo biotransformation to active metabolites via the intestinal microbiota, or affect gut barrier function. In rodents, resveratrol can modify the relative Bacteroidetes:Firmicutes ratio and reverse the gut microbial dysbiosis caused by a high-fat diet...
November 2017: Advances in Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29138485/evaluating-the-impact-of-domestication-and-captivity-on-the-horse-gut-microbiome
#17
Jessica L Metcalf, Se Jin Song, James T Morton, Sophie Weiss, Andaine Seguin-Orlando, Frédéric Joly, Claudia Feh, Pierre Taberlet, Eric Coissac, Amnon Amir, Eske Willerslev, Rob Knight, Valerie McKenzie, Ludovic Orlando
The mammal gut microbiome, which includes host microbes and their respective genes, is now recognized as an essential second genome that provides critical functions to the host. In humans, studies have revealed that lifestyle strongly influences the composition and diversity of the gastrointestinal microbiome. We hypothesized that these trends in humans may be paralleled in mammals subjected to anthropogenic forces such as domestication and captivity, in which diets and natural life histories are often greatly modified...
November 14, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29138298/first-insights-into-the-diverse-human-archaeome-specific-detection-of-archaea-in-the-gastrointestinal-tract-lung-and-nose-and-on-skin
#18
Kaisa Koskinen, Manuela R Pausan, Alexandra K Perras, Michael Beck, Corinna Bang, Maximilian Mora, Anke Schilhabel, Ruth Schmitz, Christine Moissl-Eichinger
Human-associated archaea remain understudied in the field of microbiome research, although in particular methanogenic archaea were found to be regular commensals of the human gut, where they represent keystone species in metabolic processes. Knowledge on the abundance and diversity of human-associated archaea is extremely limited, and little is known about their function(s), their overall role in human health, or their association with parts of the human body other than the gastrointestinal tract and oral cavity...
November 14, 2017: MBio
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29135334/maternal-high-fat-diet-and-its-consequence-on-the-gut-microbiome-a-rat-model
#19
Phyllis E Mann, Kevin Huynh, Giovanni Widmer
The biological changes that occur during pregnancy in the female mammal include shifts in hormonal regulation in preparation for parturition and lactation, and changes in energy metabolism. In women, studies have also shown that during pregnancy there is a reduction in bacterial species richness in the gut. In the current experiment rats were used to model the interaction of diet, reproductive status, and intestinal bacterial microbiota during pregnancy and lactation. In Experiment 1 rats were exposed to either standard chow or high-fat chow (60%) and were divided into two groups: unmated (NULL) or mated (RE)...
November 14, 2017: Gut Microbes
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29133882/discovery-of-an-expansive-bacteriophage-family-that-includes-the-most-abundant-viruses-from-the-human-gut
#20
Natalya Yutin, Kira S Makarova, Ayal B Gussow, Mart Krupovic, Anca Segall, Robert A Edwards, Eugene V Koonin
Metagenomic sequence analysis is rapidly becoming the primary source of virus discovery (1-3) . A substantial majority of the currently available virus genomes come from metagenomics, and some of these represent extremely abundant viruses, even if never grown in the laboratory. A particularly striking case of a virus discovered via metagenomics is crAssphage, which is by far the most abundant human-associated virus known, comprising up to 90% of sequences in the gut virome (4) . Over 80% of the predicted proteins encoded in the approximately 100 kilobase crAssphage genome showed no significant similarity to available protein sequences, precluding classification of this virus and hampering further study...
November 13, 2017: Nature Microbiology
keyword
keyword
113010
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"