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Mickael Bonin, Nathan Mewton, Francois Roubille, Olivier Morel, Guillaume Cayla, Denis Angoulvant, Meyer Elbaz, Marc J Claeys, David Garcia-Dorado, Céline Giraud, Gilles Rioufol, Claire Jossan, Michel Ovize, Patrice Guerin
BACKGROUND: Morphine is commonly used to treat chest pain during myocardial infarction, but its effect on cardiovascular outcome has never been directly evaluated. The aim of this study was to examine the effect and safety of morphine in patients with acute anterior ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction followed up for 1 year. METHODS AND RESULTS: We used the database of the CIRCUS (Does Cyclosporine Improve Outcome in ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction Patients) trial, which included 969 patients with anterior ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, admitted for primary percutaneous coronary intervention...
February 10, 2018: Journal of the American Heart Association
R Hermes, J Saragusty, I Moser, S Holtze, J Nieter, K Sachse, T Voracek, A Bernhard, T Bouts, F Göritz, T B Hildebrandt
Tuberculosis (TB) has been known to affect elephants for thousands of years. It was put into spotlight when few circus elephants were diagnosed carrying Mycobacterium (M.) tuberculosis. Because of the zoonotic risk and high susceptibility to M. tuberculosis, periodic testing was enacted since, in captive breeding programmes. Presently, trunk wash is the recommended diagnostic procedure for TB. Trunk wash, however, puts the operator at risk, has low sensitivity, and is prone to contamination. Here, bronchoalveolar lavage is described for the first time for TB diagnosis in elephants...
February 5, 2018: Epidemiology and Infection
Teresa Kornillowicz-Kowalska, Ignacy Kitowski
Birds' nests may be refuges for various species of fungi including that which are potentially phytopathogenic and zoopathogenic. Among the 2449 isolates of fungi obtained from nests of Marsh harriers 96.8% belonged to filamentous fungi. In total, 37 genera were identified from 63 fungi species. Within the mycobiotas of the examined nests populations of fungi which are potentially pathogenic for humans, homoiothermous animals and plants dominated. Among 63 species, 46 (72%) were potentially pathogenic fungi of which 18 species were potentially phytopathogenic and 32 species were pathogenic for homoiothermous animals...
January 2018: Saudi Journal of Biological Sciences
Fabiana B Drago, Verónica Núñez, Lía I Lunaschi
Studying the Helminthological Collection of Museo de La Plata (MLP-He), several specimens of digeneans, recovered parasitizing a long-winged harrier, Circus buffoni (Accipitridae) from Buenos Aires Argentina, were analysed. The morphological and morphometric analysis of these specimens revealed the presence of two strigeid species, one of them new for science. Parastrigea buffoni n. sp. is characterised by a forebody differentiated in a retractile cephalic region with a large opening and a balloon-shaped collar region or collerette, suckers located in cephalic region, holdfast organ with well development dorsal and ventral lips that can emerge through opening, a claviform hindbody, a large copulatory bursa with muscular ring (Ringnapf) and a genital cone well delimited, crossed by a sinuous hermaphroditic duct with internal rugae...
January 16, 2018: Parasitology Research
Arturo Ruiz-Taboada, Isabel Molero Rodrigo
World societies can often be characterized by their attitude towards elderly and illness. It is well known that most cultures were concerned about those who were not able to produce and take care of themselves. This brings to the development of social processes that involve such individuals within the community, resulting in groups who stick together, and at last, ensuring the survival of the group. The contextualization of many of those social processes might be studied through Physical Anthropology and Paleopathology...
January 10, 2018: Anthropologischer Anzeiger; Bericht über die Biologisch-anthropologische Literatur
Maria Vitale, Salvatore Gaglio, Paola Galluzzo, Giuseppe Cascone, Chiara Piraino, Vincenzo Di Marco Lo Presti, Rosa Alduina
Staphylococcus aureus is the major cause of foodborne diseases worldwide. In this retrospective study, 84 S. aureus strains were characterized. The collection comprises 78 strains isolated during 1998 and 2014 from dairy products and tissue samples from livestock bred for dairy production in Sicily. One isolate was obtained from a pet (dog), one from an exotic animal (a circus elephant), and four human isolates were obtained during a severe food poisoning outbreak that occurred in Sicily in 2015. All the strains were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), for antibiotic resistance and presence of toxin genes...
December 20, 2017: Foodborne Pathogens and Disease
Ruth L Chimenti, Linda R Van Dillen, Lynnette Khoo-Summers
Low back pain (LBP) can be detrimental to the career of a circus arts performer, yet there is minimal population-specific literature to guide care. Moreover, reluctance to discontinue training and the need to resume end-range lumbar motion can impede the success of conservative care. The purpose of this case report is to describe the use of a patient-specific outcome measure and a movement classification system to structure a home exercise program (HEP) for an adolescent training to be a circus performer. The patient was a 16-year-old female with a 10-month history of LBP...
December 15, 2017: Journal of Dance Medicine & Science
(no author information available yet)
As Ireland becomes the latest country to ban the use of wild animals in circuses, Kathryn Clark reviews the current situation in the UK.
November 18, 2017: Veterinary Record
Marie-Sophie Garcia-Heras, Beatriz Arroyo, Robert E Simmons, Pablo R Camarero, Rafael Mateo, Francois Mougeot
Persistent pollutants such as organochlorine compounds (OCs) have been highlighted as a cause of population decline in avian predators. Understanding patterns of OCs contamination can be crucial for the conservation of affected species, yet little is known on these threats to African raptors. Here we report on OC concentrations in an endangered predator endemic to southern Africa, the Black Harrier Circus maurus. Blood samples were collected in 2012-2014 from wild nestlings (n = 90) and adults (n = 23) in south-western South Africa, where agriculture and urbanization have developed rapidly since the 1950s...
October 4, 2017: Environmental Pollution
Daniel Molins-Delgado, Manuel Máñez, Ana Andreu, Fernando Hiraldo, Ethel Eljarrat, Damià Barceló, M Silvia Díaz-Cruz
The present study uses bird eggs of seven wild species as a biomonitoring tool for sunscreens occurrence. Seven UV filters (UV-Fs), including 3 hydroxy-metabolites of oxybenzone (benzophenone 3, BP3) were characterized in unhatched eggs from Doñana Natural Space (Spain). High frequency of detection was observed for all UV-Fs, ranging from 95% to 100%. The oxybenzone metabolite 4-hydroxybenzophenone (4HB) was ubiquitous at concentrations in the range 12.0-3348 ng g(-1) dry weight (dw). The parent compound, oxybenzone, was also present in all samples at lower concentrations (16...
September 20, 2017: Environmental Science & Technology
Fidelis Akunke Atuo, Timothy John O'Connell
Sympatric predators are predicted to partition resources, especially under conditions of food limitation. Spatial heterogeneity that influences prey availability might play an important role in the scales at which potential competitors select habitat. We assessed potential mechanisms for coexistence by examining the role of heterogeneity in resource partitioning between sympatric raptors overwintering in the southern Great Plains. We conducted surveys for wintering Red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) and Northern Harrier (Circus cyanea) at two state wildlife management areas in Oklahoma, USA...
August 2017: Ecology and Evolution
Fidelis Akunke Atuo, Timothy John O'Connell
The likelihood of encountering a predator influences prey behavior and spatial distribution such that non-consumptive effects can outweigh the influence of direct predation. Prey species are thought to filter information on perceived predator encounter rates in physical landscapes into a landscape of fear defined by spatially explicit heterogeneity in predation risk. The presence of multiple predators using different hunting strategies further complicates navigation through a landscape of fear and potentially exposes prey to greater risk of predation...
July 2017: Ecology and Evolution
Sarah de Leeuw
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 2016: Canadian Family Physician Médecin de Famille Canadien
V Mirza, E B Burrows, S Gils, S Hunter, B D Gartrell, L Howe
Human colonisation of New Zealand has resulted in the introduction of emerging diseases, such as avian malaria and toxoplasmosis, which arrived with their exotic avian and mammalian hosts. Plasmodium spp. and Toxoplasma gondii have a wide host range, and several species of endemic New Zealand birds have developed a fatal disease following infection with either pathogen. However, no reports of either toxoplasmosis or avian malaria in New Zealand raptors, namely, the New Zealand falcons (Falco novaeseelandiae), Australasian harriers (Circus approximans) and moreporks (Ninox novaeseelandiae) exist in the literature...
August 2017: Parasitology Research
Steve Redpath, Alex Thompson, Arjun Amar
BACKGROUND: Most birds exhibit bi-parental care with both sexes providing food for their young. Nestling signal food needs through begging. However, for some species, males rarely visit the nest, so have limited opportunity for gaining information directly from the chicks. Instead, females beg when males deliver food. We tested whether this calling signalled nutritional need and specifically the needs of the female (Breeder Need hypothesis) or that of their chicks (Offspring Need hypothesis)...
June 19, 2017: BMC Evolutionary Biology
Marie-Sophie García-Heras, Beatriz Arroyo, Robert E Simmons, Pablo R Camarero, Rafael Mateo, Jesús T García, Francois Mougeot
Carotenoid-based traits or ornaments, such as yellow-red integuments (feathers, beaks, legs or eye-rings) displayed by birds, play key roles in social communication by reliably advertising an individual's quality or health. In some species, these traits are displayed not only by adults but also by nestlings, and function in parent-offspring communication or sibling competition by advertising an individual's physical or physiological condition. Pollutants such as organochlorine compounds (OCs) could have disruptive effects on the coloration of these traits, thereby interfering with communication processes...
June 16, 2017: Science of the Total Environment
Anne E Goodenough, Natasha Little, William S Carpenter, Adam G Hart
Pre-roost murmuration displays by European starlings Sturnus vulgaris are a spectacular example of collective animal behaviour. To date, empirical research has focussed largely on flock movement and biomechanics whereas research on possible causal mechanisms that affect flock size and murmuration duration has been limited and restricted to a small number of sites. Possible explanations for this behaviour include reducing predation through the dilution, detection or predator confusion effects (the "safer together" hypotheses) or recruiting more birds to create larger (warmer) roosts (the "warmer together" hypothesis)...
2017: PloS One
Almut E Schlaich, Willem Bouten, Vincent Bretagnolle, Henning Heldbjerg, Raymond H G Klaassen, Iben H Sørensen, Alexandre Villers, Christiaan Both
Long-distance migrants are particularly recognized for the distances covered on migration, yet little is known about the distances they cover during the rest of the year. GPS-tracks of 29 Montagu's harriers from breeding areas in France, The Netherlands and Denmark showed that harriers fly between 35 653 and 88 049 km yr-1 , of which on average only 28.5% is on migration. Mean daily distances during migration were 296 km d-1 in autumn and 252 km d-1 in spring. Surprisingly, males' daily distances during breeding (217 km d-1 ) were close to those during migration, whereas breeding females moved significantly less (101 km d-1 ) than males...
June 2017: Biology Letters
Ákos Boros, Péter Pankovics, Róbert Mátics, Ádám Adonyi, Nóra Bolba, Tung Gia Phan, Eric Delwart, Gábor Reuter
In this study, the complete genome of a novel picornavirus called harrier picornavirus 1 (HaPV-1) strain harrier/MR-01/HUN/2014 (KY488458) was sequenced and analysed from a cloacal sample of a threatened, carnivorous wild bird, western marsh harrier (Circus aeruginosus). HaPV-1 was detectable from 2 of the 3 samples from harriers. HaPV-1 is phylogenetically related to megriviruses (genus Megrivirus) from domestic chicken, turkey and duck, showing a similar genome organization pattern; it also has an avian picornavirus-like "Unit A" motif in the 3' UTR...
September 2017: Archives of Virology
Adam Staten
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2017: British Journal of General Practice: the Journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners
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