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Facial muscles

Justin Chamberland, Annie Roy-Charland, Melanie Perron, Joël Dickinson
The perceptual-attentional limitation hypothesis posits that the confusion between emotional facial expressions of fear and surprise may be due to their visual similarity, with shared muscle movements. In Experiment 1 full face images of fear and surprise varying as a function of distinctiveness (mouth index, brow index or both indices) were displayed in a gender oddball task. Experiment 2, in a similar task, directed attention towards the eye or mouth region with a blurring technique. The current two studies used response time and event-related potentials (ERP) to test the perceptual-attentional limitation hypothesis...
October 21, 2016: Social Neuroscience
Paulo Esteves Pinto Faria, Abrahão Cavalcante Gomes de Souza Carvalho, Bárbara Masalskas, Letícia Chihara, Eduardo Sant'Ana, Osvaldo Magro Filho
One of the most impressive soft tissue injuries is the facial degloving, normally associated with industrial machines and traffic accidents. This injury is characterized by the separation of the skin and cartilage from the bones, compromising the soft tissues correlated in the trauma area, nerves, and blood vessels. A 28-year-old patient, male, was referred to Araçatuba's Santa Casa Hospital, after a motorcycle accident, hitting his face on the sidewalk. The patient was conscious, oriented, denying fainting and unconsciousness during the accident, and complaining of pain in the nasal region of the face...
October 2016: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery
Ozan Erol, Erdinç Aydın
BACKGROUND: Hemifacial spasm is a sudden, involuntary and synchronous spasm of the facial muscles. The most frequent cause of this condition is compression of the facial nerves due to vascular pathologies. The most commonly used method of treatment is Botulinum toxin injection. However, the gold standard treatment is surgical treatment. CASE REPORT: A 64-year-old male patient with hemifacial spasms, which had occurred due to a rare parotid mass that had been surgically treated, is presented in this case...
September 2016: Balkan Medical Journal
Hideaki Kishimoto, Yoshitaka Matsuura, Katsuya Kawai, Shigehito Yamada, Shigehiko Suzuki
When the lesser palatine nerve (LPN) is supposed to be a branch of the trigeminal nerve and innervate sensation of the soft palate, whether the LPN contains motor fibers is unclear. In this study, we monitored the electromyogram of the levator veli palatini (LVP) muscle on stimulating the LPN during palatoplasty in 3 patients. The electromyogram of the muscles showed the myogenic potential induced by electrostimulation of the LPN. Taken together with the finding from our previous anatomical study that the motor fibers come from the facial nerve, this result supports the double innervation theory of the LVP, which posits that both the pharyngeal plexus and the facial nerve innervate it...
September 2016: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Global Open
Joseph Catapano, Daniel R B Demsey, Emily S Ho, Ronald M Zuker, Gregory H Borschel
Smiling is an important aspect of emotional expression and social interaction, leaving facial palsy patients with impaired social functioning and decreased overall quality of life. Although there are several techniques available for facial reanimation, staged facial reanimation using donor nerve branches from the contralateral, functioning facial nerve connected to a cross-face nerve graft (CFNG) is the only technique that can reliably reproduce an emotionally spontaneous smile. Although CFNGs provide spontaneity, they typically produce less smile excursion than when the subsequent free functioning muscle flap is innervated with the motor nerve to the masseter muscle...
September 2016: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Global Open
Herman Vercruysse, Luc Van Nassauw, Joan San Miguel-Moragas, Eva Lakiere, Sten Stevens, Geert Van Hemelen, Mirco Raffaini, Nasser Nadjmi
INTRODUCTION: Postoperative flattening of the upper lip with loss of lip pout and down turning of the corners of the mouth is often seen after Le Fort I surgery. We aim to determine which facial muscles are involved in this phenomenon to update the literature on this subject. METHODS: In 6 cadavers, a unilateral Le Fort I incision was executed. After removal of the skin, all individual facial muscles were identified and submitted to bilateral tactile traction, comparing incised sides with non-incised sides...
September 22, 2016: Journal of Cranio-maxillo-facial Surgery
Bowen Gao, Qingxiong Yu, Feng Xie, Lingling Sheng, Xiyuan Mao, Qingfeng Li, Hainan Zhu
BACKGROUND: Conventional reconstructive methods fail to achieve satisfactory results in total eyelid defect cases. Vascularized composite tissue allotransplantation might provide both good appearance and function for these patients. The structure of the eyelid is exceptional because it simultaneously consists of skin, connective tissue, the striated muscle, fiber structure, aponeuroses, and mucosa. Thus, before clinical application of eyelid allotransplantation, more experiments are needed to clarify the impact of ischemia, immunal suppressive agents, and deinnervation effects on these sophisticated structures...
October 13, 2016: Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Ashraf Raslan, Gerd Fabian Volk, Martin Möller, Vincent Stark, Nikolas Eckhardt, Orlando Guntinas-Lichius
OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: To examine by intraoperative electric stimulation which peripheral facial nerve (FN) branches are functionally connected to which facial muscle functions. STUDY DESIGN: Single-center prospective clinical study. METHODS: Seven patients whose peripheral FN branching was exposed during parotidectomy under FN monitoring received a systematic electrostimulation of each branch starting with 0.1 mA and stepwise increase to 2 mA with a frequency of 3 Hz...
October 18, 2016: Laryngoscope
Clayton P Mosher, Prisca E Zimmerman, Andrew J Fuglevand, Katalin M Gothard
The majority of neurophysiological studies that have explored the role of the primate amygdala in the evaluation of social signals have relied on visual stimuli such as images of facial expressions. Vision, however, is not the only sensory modality that carries social signals. Both humans and nonhuman primates exchange emotionally meaningful social signals through touch. Indeed, social grooming in nonhuman primates and caressing touch in humans is critical for building lasting and reassuring social bonds. To determine the role of the amygdala in processing touch, we recorded the responses of single neurons in the macaque amygdala while we applied tactile stimuli to the face...
September 2016: ENeuro
Paulo Domingos Ribeiro-Junior, Ricardo Alexandre Galdioli Senko, Gabriel Cury Batista Mendes, Fernando Gianzanti Peres
Facial nerve has great functional and aesthetic importance to the face, and damage to its structure can lead to major complications. This article reports a clinical case of neuroanastomosis of the facial nerve after facial trauma, describing surgical procedure and postoperative follow-up. A trauma patient with extensive injury cut in right mandibular body causing neurotmesis of the VIIth cranial nerve and mandibular angle fracture right side was treated. During surgical exploration, the nerve segments were identified and a neuroanastomosis was performed using nylon 10-0, after reduction and internal fixation of the mandibular fracture...
October 2016: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery
Gina L O'Grady, Heather A Best, Tamar E Sztal, Vanessa Schartner, Myriam Sanjuan-Vazquez, Sandra Donkervoort, Osorio Abath Neto, Roger Bryan Sutton, Biljana Ilkovski, Norma Beatriz Romero, Tanya Stojkovic, Jahannaz Dastgir, Leigh B Waddell, Anne Boland, Ying Hu, Caitlin Williams, Avnika A Ruparelia, Thierry Maisonobe, Anthony J Peduto, Stephen W Reddel, Monkol Lek, Taru Tukiainen, Beryl B Cummings, Himanshu Joshi, Juliette Nectoux, Susan Brammah, Jean-François Deleuze, Viola Oorschot Ing, Georg Ramm, Didem Ardicli, Kristen J Nowak, Beril Talim, Haluk Topaloglu, Nigel G Laing, Kathryn N North, Daniel G MacArthur, Sylvie Friant, Nigel F Clarke, Robert J Bryson-Richardson, Carsten G Bönnemann, Jocelyn Laporte, Sandra T Cooper
This study establishes PYROXD1 variants as a cause of early-onset myopathy and uses biospecimens and cell lines, yeast, and zebrafish models to elucidate the fundamental role of PYROXD1 in skeletal muscle. Exome sequencing identified recessive variants in PYROXD1 in nine probands from five families. Affected individuals presented in infancy or childhood with slowly progressive proximal and distal weakness, facial weakness, nasal speech, swallowing difficulties, and normal to moderately elevated creatine kinase...
September 28, 2016: American Journal of Human Genetics
Chandrashekhar R Bande, Akshay Mishra, M K Gupta, Manu Goel, Mayur J Gawande
PURPOSE: Resections in the posterior component of the oral cavity usually lead to severe functional compromise and lower quality of life for patients. Notable advances in reconstruction of the posterior part of the mouth and of the oropharynx have occurred in recent decades. The anatomic and physiologic rehabilitation of the defect to a reasonable outcome with low morbidity and mortality remains the founding basis of any surgical reconstruction, which also holds true for oral oropharyngeal and retromaxillary reconstructions...
September 17, 2016: Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Eva Placheta, Ines Tinhofer, Melanie Schmid, Lukas F Reissig, Igor Pona, Wolfgang Weninger, Thomas Rath, David Chwei-Chin Chuang, Chieh-Han John Tzou
INTRODUCTION: Facial reanimation surgery is performed in severe cases of facial palsy to restore facial function. In a 1-stage procedure, the spinal accessory nerve can be used as a donor nerve to power a free gracilis muscle transplant for the reanimation of the mouth. The aim of this study was to describe the surgical anatomy of the spinal accessory nerve, provide a guide for reliable donor nerve dissection, and analyze the available donor axon counts. METHODS: Dissections were performed on 10 nonembalmed cadavers (measurements of 20 nerves)...
October 6, 2016: Annals of Plastic Surgery
Nicola Marchili, Eleonora Ortu, Davide Pietropaoli, Ruggero Cattaneo, Annalisa Monaco
Stomatognathic system is strictly correlated to other anatomical regions; many studies investigated relationship between temporomandibular joint and posture, several articles describe cranio-facial pain from dental causes, such as trigger points. Until now less interest has been given to connections between dental occlusion and ophthalmology, even if they are important and involving. Clinical experience in dental practice claims that mandibular latero-deviation is connected both to eye dominance and to defects of ocular convergence...
2016: Open Dentistry Journal
Wouter M M T van Hout, Ellen M Van Cann, Ronald Koole, Antoine J W P Rosenberg
: This study investigates treatment outcome in zygomaticomaxillary complex (ZMC) fracture repair. METHODS: The medical records and CT-images of patients that received treatment for a unilateral ZMC fracture in 2005-2011 were studied. ZMC fractures were categorised as incomplete (type A), tetrapod (type B) or comminuted (type C). The incidence of sequelae, wound infection and secondary surgical interventions was analysed per fracture category. RESULTS: A total of 153 patients were treated in the selected period...
September 13, 2016: Journal of Cranio-maxillo-facial Surgery
Elizabeth Fairgray, Anna Miles
PURPOSE: Moebius Syndrome is a rare congenital neurological condition often characterized by multiple cranial nerve involvement. This case study presents an eight-year old girl with Moebius Syndrome (MC) who received 30 sessions of speech therapy. This occurred after presenting to clinic 11 months after left facial reanimation with gracilis thigh muscle transfer surgery. On examination, only flickers of left facial movement were observed. There was no movement on the right side of the face...
November 2016: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
Mengyi Liu, Shiguang Shan, Ruiping Wang, Xilin Chen
Facial expression is a temporally dynamic event which can be decomposed into a set of muscle motions occurring in different facial regions over various time intervals. For dynamic expression recognition, two key issues, temporal alignment and semantics-aware dynamic representation, must be taken into account. In this paper, we attempt to solve both problems via manifold modeling of videos based on a novel midlevel representation, i.e. expressionlet. Specifically, our method contains three key stages: 1) each expression video clip is characterized as a spatial-temporal manifold (STM) formed by dense low-level features; 2) a Universal Manifold Model (UMM) is learned over all low-level features and represented as a set of local modes to statistically unify all the STMs...
October 5, 2016: IEEE Transactions on Image Processing: a Publication of the IEEE Signal Processing Society
Stefanos Eleftheriadis, Ognjen Rudovic, Maja Pantic
Automated analysis of facial expressions can benefit many domains, from marketing to clinical diagnosis of neurodevelopmental disorders. Facial expressions are typically encoded as a combination of facial muscle activations, i.e., action units. Depending on context, these action units co-occur in specific patterns, and rarely in isolation. Yet, most existing methods for automatic action unit detection fail to exploit dependencies among them, and the corresponding facial features. To address this, we propose a novel multi-conditional latent variable model for simultaneous fusion of facial features and joint action unit detection...
October 5, 2016: IEEE Transactions on Image Processing: a Publication of the IEEE Signal Processing Society
A Fasano, M Tinazzi
Functional movement disorders (FMDs) affecting the eyelids, tongue, and other facial muscles are often underrecognized because their phenomenology has not been fully characterized. Nevertheless, these disorders are more common than previously thought. In this chapter we will discuss the phenomenology as well as the clinical and instrumental diagnosis of facial FMDs. Facial FMDs should be considered when a patient exhibits any combination of the following features: (1) fixed unilateral facial contractions, especially with lower lip, with or without ipsilateral jaw involvement, of maximal severity at onset; (2) inconsistent features such as changes in side and pattern during or between examination; (3) associated somatoform or nonphysiologic sensory or motor findings; (4) reduction or abolition of facial spasm with distraction; (5) response to suggestion or psychotherapy; (6) rapid onset and/or spontaneous remissions; and (7) normal neurologic examination...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
Franz Alisch, Alexander Weichert, Karim Kalache, Viola Paradiso, Ann Carolin Longardt, Christof Dame, Katrin Hoffmann, Denise Horn
Gordon syndrome or distal arthrogryposis type 3 is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by contractures of upper and lower limbs. It is distinguishable from other forms of distal arthrogryposis by cleft palate and short stature. Recently, Gordon syndrome has been associated to heterozygous mutations in the piezo-type mechanosensitive ion channel component 2 gene (PIEZO2). Different mutations of this gene also cause distal arthrogryposis type 5 and Marden-Walker syndrome. Dysfunction of this ion channel provides pleiotropic effects on joints, ocular muscles, and bone development...
October 7, 2016: American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A
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