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adaptor protein

Carlos M Guardia, Raffaella De Pace, Rafael Mattera, Juan S Bonifacino
Selective transport of transmembrane proteins to different intracellular compartments often involves the recognition of sorting signals in the cytosolic domains of the proteins by components of membrane coats. Some of these coats have as their key components a family of heterotetrameric adaptor protein (AP) complexes named AP-1 through AP-5. AP complexes play important roles in all cells, but their functions are most critical in neurons because of the extreme compartmental complexity of these cells. Accordingly, various diseases caused by mutations in AP subunit genes exhibit a range of neurological abnormalities as their most salient features...
March 17, 2018: Current Opinion in Neurobiology
Wang Dong, Huifang Lv, Cheng Li, Yaru Liu, Chengbao Wang, Jihui Lin, Yifan Wang, Gui Qian, Kangkang Guo, Yanming Zhang
Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) infection results in highly significant economic losses. Previous studies have suggested that CSFV can be recognized by RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) to trigger innate defenses. However, the role of mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS), the adaptor of RLRs, is still unknown during CSFV infection. Here, we showed that CSFV infection increased MAVS expression in porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs). Additionally, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were involved in MAVS expression in CSFV-infected PAMs...
March 19, 2018: Archives of Virology
Zeanap A Mabruk, Samrein B M Ahmed, Asha Caroline Thomas, Sally A Prigent
Preliminary screening data showed that the ShcD adaptor protein associates with the proto-oncogene RET receptor tyrosine kinase. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the molecular interaction between ShcD and RET in human neuroblastoma cells and study the functional impact of this interaction. We were able to show that ShcD immunoprecipitated with RET from SK-N-AS neuroblastoma cell lysates upon GDNF treatment. This result was validated by ShcD-RET co-localization, which was visualized using a fluorescence microscope...
March 2018: Biochemistry and Biophysics Reports
Antonio Layoun, Macha Samba-Mondonga, Gabriela Fragoso, Annie Calvé, Manuela M Santos
Iron homeostasis is tightly regulated to provide virtually all cells in the body, particularly red blood cells, with this essential element while defending against its toxicity. The peptide hormone hepcidin is central to the control of the amount of iron absorbed from the diet and iron recycling from macrophages. Previously, we have shown that hepcidin induction in macrophages following Toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulation depends on the presence of myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88). In this study, we analyzed the regulation of iron metabolism in MyD88 -/- mice to further investigate MyD88 involvement in iron sensing and hepcidin induction...
2018: Frontiers in Physiology
Yuhua Chen, Lingling Meng, Haitao Shang, Qian Dou, Zhiwen Lu, Liping Liu, Zhijun Wang, Xingxing He, Yuhu Song
βII-Spectrin (β2SP), a Smad3/4 adaptor protein during transforming growth factor (TGF) β/Smad signal pathway, plays a critical role in suppressing hepatocarcinogenesis. Dedifferentiation is a distinctive feature of cancer progression. Therefore, we investigated whether the disruption of β2SP contributed to tumorigenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) through the dedifferentiation. Down-regulation of β2SP in hepatocytes was observed in cirrhotic liver and HCC. The level of β2SP expression was closely associated with the differentiation status of hepatocytes in rat model of hepatocarcinogenesis and clinical specimens...
March 19, 2018: Cell Death & Disease
Jun-Ichi Satoh, Yoshihiro Kino, Motoaki Yanaizu, Yuko Saito
Nasu-Hakola disease (NHD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, characterized by progressive presenile dementia and formation of multifocal bone cysts, caused by genetic mutations of either triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 ( TREM2 ) or TYRO protein tyrosine kinase binding protein ( TYROBP ), alternatively named DNAX-activation protein 12 ( DAP12 ), both of which are expressed on microglia in the brain and form the receptor-adaptor complex that chiefly recognizes anionic lipids. TREM2 transmits the signals involved in microglial survival, proliferation, chemotaxis, and phagocytosis...
February 2018: Intractable & Rare Diseases Research
Concetta Saponaro, Sara Sergio, Antonio Coluccia, Maria De Luca, Giuseppe La Regina, Luca Mologni, Valeria Famiglini, Valentina Naccarato, Daniela Bonetti, Candice Gautier, Stefano Gianni, Daniele Vergara, Michel Salzet, Isabelle Fournier, Cecilia Bucci, Romano Silvestri, Carlo Gambacorti Passerini, Michele Maffia, Addolorata Maria Luce Coluccia
Nuclear activated β-catenin plays a causative role in colorectal cancers (CRC) but remains an elusive therapeutic target. Using human CRC cells harboring different Wnt/β-catenin pathway mutations in APC/KRAS or β-catenin/KRAS genes, and both genetic and pharmacological knockdown approaches, we show that oncogenic β-catenin signaling negatively regulates the expression of NHERF1 (Na+ /H+ exchanger 3 regulating factor 1), a PDZ-adaptor protein that is usually lost or downregulated in early dysplastic adenomas to exacerbate nuclear β-catenin activity...
March 19, 2018: Oncogene
Delia Bucher, Felix Frey, Kem A Sochacki, Susann Kummer, Jan-Philip Bergeest, William J Godinez, Hans-Georg Kräusslich, Karl Rohr, Justin W Taraska, Ulrich S Schwarz, Steeve Boulant
Although essential for many cellular processes, the sequence of structural and molecular events during clathrin-mediated endocytosis remains elusive. While it was long believed that clathrin-coated pits grow with a constant curvature, it was recently suggested that clathrin first assembles to form flat structures that then bend while maintaining a constant surface area. Here, we combine correlative electron and light microscopy and mathematical growth laws to study the ultrastructural rearrangements of the clathrin coat during endocytosis in BSC-1 mammalian cells...
March 16, 2018: Nature Communications
Christian Krapp, Kasper Jønsson, Martin R Jakobsen
Sensing of DNA is essential for the innate immune system to detect threats, like viruses, intracellular bacteria or cellular DNA damage. At the centre of this conserved mammalian mechanism stands the adaptor protein STING. STING is highly regulated and is part of a complex signalling network. This network depends on the sensors cGAS and IFI16 to detect misplaced DNA in the cytoplasm as well as on the kinase TBK1 and the transcription factor IRF3. The DNA sensing machinery has been implicated in many diseases, among others HIV...
March 9, 2018: Cytokine & Growth Factor Reviews
Graeme Milligan, Asuka Inoue
Rapid developments in genome editing, based largely on CRISPR/Cas9 technologies, are offering unprecedented opportunities to eliminate the expression of single or multiple gene products in intact organisms and in model cell systems. Elimination of individual G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), both single and multiple G protein subunits, and arrestin adaptor proteins is providing new and sometimes unanticipated insights into molecular details of the regulation of cell signalling pathways and the behaviour of receptor ligands...
March 13, 2018: Trends in Pharmacological Sciences
Lan Hai, Maria M Szwarc, Bin He, David M Lonard, Ramakrishna Kommagani, Francesco J DeMayo, John P Lydon
Speckle-type poz protein (SPOP) is an E3-ubiquitin ligase adaptor for turnover of a diverse number of proteins involved in key cellular processes from chromatin remodeling, transcriptional regulation to cell signaling. Genomic analysis revealed that SPOP somatic mutations are found in a subset of endometrial cancers, suggesting that these mutations act as oncogenic drivers of this gynecologic malignancy. These studies also raise the question as to the role of wild type SPOP in normal uterine function. To address this question, we generated a mouse model (Spopd/d) in which SPOP is ablated in uterine cells that express the PGR...
March 13, 2018: Biology of Reproduction
Ali Ben Djoudi Ouadda, Yi He, Viviane Calabrese, Hidetaka Ishii, Rony Chidiac, Jean-Philippe Gratton, Philippe P Roux, Nathalie Lamarche-Vane
Cdc42 GTPase-activating protein (CdGAP, also named ARHGAP31) is a negative regulator of the GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42. Associated with the rare developmental disorder Adams-Oliver Syndrome (AOS), CdGAP is critical for embryonic vascular development and VEGF-mediated angiogenesis. Moreover, CdGAP is an essential component in the synergistic interaction between TGFβ and ErbB-2 signaling pathways during breast cancer cell migration and invasion, and is a novel E-cadherin transcriptional co-repressor with Zeb2 in breast cancer...
February 20, 2018: Oncotarget
Lorenza Tulli, Francesca Cattaneo, Juliette Vinot, Cosima T Baldari, Ugo D'Oro
Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a key role in the activation of innate immune cells, in which their engagement leads to production of cytokines and co-stimulatory molecules. TLRs signaling requires recruitment of toll/IL-1R (TIR) domain-containing adaptors, such as MyD88 and/or TRIF, and leads to activation of several transcription factors, such as NF-κB, the AP1 complex, and various members of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family, which in turn results in triggering of several cellular functions associated with these receptors...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
Jarrod S Johnson, Sasha Y Lucas, Lynn M Amon, Stephanie Skelton, Rodolfo Nazitto, Sara Carbonetti, D Noah Sather, Dan R Littman, Alan Aderem
Myeloid dendritic cells (DCs) have the innate capacity to sense pathogens and orchestrate immune responses. However, DCs do not mount efficient immune responses to HIV-1, primarily due to restriction of virus reverse transcription, which prevents accumulation of viral cDNA and limits its detection through the cGAS-STING pathway. By allowing reverse transcription to proceed, we find that DCs detect HIV-1 in distinct phases, before and after virus integration. Blocking integration suppresses, but does not abolish, activation of the transcription factor IRF3, downstream interferon (IFN) responses, and DC maturation...
March 14, 2018: Cell Host & Microbe
Thomas O Tolsma, Lena M Cuevas, Santiago M Di Pietro
Clathrin mediated endocytosis is a fundamental transport pathway that depends on numerous protein-protein interactions. Testing the importance of the adaptor protein-clathrin interaction for coat formation and progression of endocytosis in vivo has been difficult due to experimental constrains. Here we addressed this question using the yeast clathrin adaptor Sla1, which is unique in showing a cargo endocytosis defect upon substitution of three amino acids in its clathrin-binding motif (sla1AAA ) that disrupt clathrin binding...
March 15, 2018: Traffic
Li-Na Wang, Mei-Hua Gao, Bing Wang, Bei-Bei Cong, Shu-Chao Zhang
Cluster of differentiation 59 (CD59) is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein. Cross-linking of CD59 with specific monoclonal antibodies can cause a series of intracellular signal transduction events. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Linker for activation of T-cells (LAT) is a crucial adaptor protein in T-cell signaling, and its phosphorylation and palmitoylation are essential for its localization and function. In a previous study by the present authors, it was demonstrated that CD59 may be responsible for LAT palmitoylation, thereby regulating T-cell signal transduction...
April 2018: Oncology Letters
Antoine Abou Jaoude, Lise Badiqué, Mohamed Mlih, Sara Awan, Sunning Guo, Alexandre Lemle, Clauda Abboud, Sophie Foppolo, Lionel Host, Jérôme Terrand, Hélène Justiniano, Joachim Herz, Rachel L Matz, Philippe Boucher
ShcA is an adaptor protein that binds to the cytoplasmic tail of receptor tyrosine kinases and of the Low Density Lipoprotein-related receptor 1 (LRP1), a trans-membrane receptor that protects against atherosclerosis. Here, we examined the role of endothelial ShcA in atherosclerotic lesion formation. We found that atherosclerosis progression was markedly attenuated in mice deleted for ShcA in endothelial cells, that macrophage content was reduced at the sites of lesions, and that adhesion molecules such as the intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) were severely reduced...
March 14, 2018: Scientific Reports
Nicla Porciello, Paola Grazioli, Antonio F Campese, Martina Kunkl, Silvana Caristi, Marta Mastrogiovanni, Michela Muscolini, Francesca Spadaro, Cédric Favre, Jacques A Nunès, Aldo Borroto, Balbino Alarcon, Isabella Screpanti, Loretta Tuosto
CD28 superagonistic antibodies (CD28SAb) can preferentially activate and expand immunosuppressive regulatory T cells (Treg) in mice. However, pre-clinical trials assessing CD28SAbs for the therapy of autoimmune diseases reveal severe systemic inflammatory response syndrome in humans, thereby implying the existence of distinct signalling abilities between human and mouse CD28. Here, we show that a single amino acid variant within the C-terminal proline-rich motif of human and mouse CD28 (P212 in human vs. A210 in mouse) regulates CD28-induced NF-κB activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression...
March 14, 2018: Nature Communications
Fei Xiao, Stanley Wang, Rina Barouch-Bentov, Gregory Neveu, Szuyuan Pu, Melanie Beer, Stanford Schor, Sathish Kumar, Vlad Nicolaescu, Brett D Lindenbach, Glenn Randall, Shirit Einav
Hepatitis C virus (HCV) spreads via secreted cell-free particles or direct cell-to-cell transmission. Yet, virus-host determinants governing differential intracellular trafficking of cell-free- and cell-to-cell-transmitted virus remain unknown. The host adaptor proteins (APs) AP-1A, AP-1B, and AP-4 traffic in post-Golgi compartments, and the latter two are implicated in basolateral sorting. We reported that AP-1A mediates HCV trafficking during release, whereas the endocytic adaptor AP-2 mediates entry and assembly...
March 13, 2018: MBio
Laurie Galvan, Laetitia Francelle, Marie-Claude Gaillard, Lucie de Longprez, Maria-Angeles Carrillo-de Sauvage, Géraldine Liot, Karine Cambon, Lev Stimmer, Sophie Luccantoni, Julien Flament, Julien Valette, Michel de Chaldée, Gwenaelle Auregan, Martine Guillermier, Charlène Joséphine, Fanny Petit, Caroline Jan, Margot Jarrige, Noëlle Dufour, Gilles Bonvento, Sandrine Humbert, Frédéric Saudou, Philippe Hantraye, Karine Merienne, Alexis-Pierre Bemelmans, Anselme L Perrier, Nicole Déglon, Emmanuel Brouillet
The neurobiological functions of a number of kinases expressed in the brain are unknown. Here, we report new findings on DCLK3 (doublecortin like kinase 3), which is preferentially expressed in neurons in the striatum and dentate gyrus. Its function has never been investigated. DCLK3 expression is markedly reduced in Huntington's disease. Recent data obtained in studies related to cancer suggest DCLK3 could have an anti-apoptotic effect. Thus, we hypothesized that early loss of DCLK3 in Huntington's disease may render striatal neurons more susceptible to mutant huntingtin (mHtt)...
March 9, 2018: Brain: a Journal of Neurology
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