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cytoplasmic incompatibility

Michael Turelli, Brandon S Cooper, Kelly M Richardson, Paul S Ginsberg, Brooke Peckenpaugh, Chenling X Antelope, Kevin J Kim, Michael R May, Antoine Abrieux, Derek A Wilson, Michael J Bronski, Brian R Moore, Jian-Jun Gao, Michael B Eisen, Joanna C Chiu, William R Conner, Ary A Hoffmann
Maternally transmitted Wolbachia, Spiroplasma, and Cardinium bacteria are common in insects [1], but their interspecific spread is poorly understood. Endosymbionts can spread rapidly within host species by manipulating host reproduction, as typified by the global spread of wRi Wolbachia observed in Drosophila simulans [2, 3]. However, because Wolbachia cannot survive outside host cells, spread between distantly related host species requires horizontal transfers that are presumably rare [4-7]. Here, we document spread of wRi-like Wolbachia among eight highly diverged Drosophila hosts (10-50 million years) over only about 14,000 years (5,000-27,000)...
March 2, 2018: Current Biology: CB
Heinrich Zu Dohna, Carine Houry, Zakaria Kambris
The endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia infects a wide range of arthropods and their relatives. It is an intracellular parasite transmitted through the egg from mother to offspring. Wolbachia can spread and persist through various means of host reproductive manipulation. How these different mechanisms of host manipulation evolved in Wolbachia is unclear. Which host reproductive phenotype is most likely to be ancestral and whether evolutionary transitions between some host phenotypes are more common than others remain unanswered questions...
February 2018: Ecology and Evolution
Yan-Kai Zhang, Kun Yang, Yu-Xi Zhu, Xiao-Yue Hong
Double infections of Wolbachia and Spiroplasma are frequent in natural populations of Tetranychus truncatus, a polyphagous mite species that has been a dominant species in China since 2009. However, little is known about the causes and ecological importance of such coexistences. In this study, we established T. truncatus strains with different infection types and then inferred the impact of the two endosymbionts on host reproduction and fitness. Double infection induced cytoplasmic incompatibility, which was demonstrated by reduction in egg hatchability of incompatible crosses...
February 2018: Ecology and Evolution
Thomas H Ant, Christie S Herd, Vincent Geoghegan, Ary A Hoffmann, Steven P Sinkins
Introduced transinfections of the inherited bacteria Wolbachia can inhibit transmission of viruses by Aedes mosquitoes, and in Ae. aegypti are now being deployed for dengue control in a number of countries. Only three Wolbachia strains from the large number that exist in nature have to date been introduced and characterized in this species. Here novel Ae. aegypti transinfections were generated using the wAlbA and wAu strains. In its native Ae. albopictus, wAlbA is maintained at lower density than the co-infecting wAlbB, but following transfer to Ae...
January 2018: PLoS Pathogens
Manon Bonneau, Celestine Atyame, Marwa Beji, Fabienne Justy, Martin Cohen-Gonsaud, Mathieu Sicard, Mylène Weill
Culex pipiens mosquitoes are infected with Wolbachia (wPip) that cause an important diversity of cytoplasmic incompatibilities (CIs). Functional transgenic studies have implicated the cidA-cidB operon from wPip and its homolog in wMel in CI between infected Drosophila males and uninfected females. However, the genetic basis of the CI diversity induced by different Wolbachia strains was unknown. We show here that the remarkable diversity of CI in the C. pipiens complex is due to the presence, in all tested wPip genomes, of several copies of the cidA-cidB operon, which undergoes diversification through recombination events...
January 22, 2018: Nature Communications
Amelia R I Lindsey, Danny W Rice, Sarah R Bordenstein, Andrew W Brooks, Seth R Bordenstein, Irene L G Newton
The bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia manipulates arthropod reproduction to facilitate its maternal spread through host populations. The most common manipulation is cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI): Wolbachia-infected males produce modified sperm that cause embryonic mortality, unless rescued by embryos harboring the same Wolbachia. The genes underlying CI, cifA and cifB, were recently identified in the eukaryotic association module of Wolbachia's prophage WO. Here, we use transcriptomic and genomic approaches to address three important evolutionary facets of the cif genes...
January 17, 2018: Genome Biology and Evolution
Romain Gibeaux, Rachael Acker, Maiko Kitaoka, Georgios Georgiou, Ila van Kruijsbergen, Breanna Ford, Edward M Marcotte, Daniel K Nomura, Taejoon Kwon, Gert Jan C Veenstra, Rebecca Heald
Hybridization of eggs and sperm from closely related species can give rise to genetic diversity, or can lead to embryo inviability owing to incompatibility. Although central to evolution, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying post-zygotic barriers that drive reproductive isolation and speciation remain largely unknown. Species of the African clawed frog Xenopus provide an ideal system to study hybridization and genome evolution. Xenopus laevis is an allotetraploid with 36 chromosomes that arose through interspecific hybridization of diploid progenitors, whereas Xenopus tropicalis is a diploid with 20 chromosomes that diverged from a common ancestor approximately 48 million years ago...
January 10, 2018: Nature
Chia-Ching Chu, Mark Hoffmann, W Evan Braswell, Kirsten S Pelz-Stelinski
Wolbachia can profoundly influence the survival, reproduction, and defenses of insect hosts. These interactions could potentially be harnessed for managing pests or insect-transmitted diseases. Diaphorina citri Kuwayama is a phloem-feeding pest capable of transmitting the putative causal agent of citrus greening, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas). Like many insects, D. citri is also infected with Wolbachia (wDi). Recent studies indicate that the relative abundance of wDi could be associated with the abundance of CLas, and that wDi may contribute to regulating expression of phage lytic cycle genes in CLas, suggesting the need for better understanding of wDi biology in general...
December 29, 2017: Insect Science
Qiong Zhang, Bing Wang, Jinping Wei, Xiaojie Wang, Qingmei Han, Zhensheng Kang
Nuclear Transport Factor 2 (NTF2) functions as a critical regulator in balancing the GTP-and GDP-bound forms of Ran, a class of evolutionarily conserved small GTP-binding protein. During the incompatible interaction between wheat-Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), a cDNA fragment encoding a putative wheat NTF2 gene was found to be significantly induced, suggesting a potential role in wheat resistance to Pst. In this work, the full length of TaNTF2 was obtained, with three copies located on 7A, 7B and 7D chromosomes, respectively...
December 16, 2017: Plant Physiology and Biochemistry: PPB
Mugen Huang, Jiaowan Luo, Linchao Hu, Bo Zheng, Jianshe Yu
To suppress wild population of Aedes mosquitoes, the primary transmission vector of life-threatening diseases such as dengue, malaria, and Zika, an innovative strategy is to release male mosquitoes carrying the bacterium Wolbachia into natural areas to drive female sterility by cytoplasmic incompatibility. We develop a model of delay differential equations, incorporating the strong density restriction in the larval stage, to assess the delicate impact of life table parameters on suppression efficiency. Through mathematical analysis, we find the sufficient and necessary condition for global stability of the complete suppression state...
December 14, 2017: Journal of Theoretical Biology
Roman Zug, Peter Hammerstein
Maternally inherited symbionts such as Wolbachia have long been seen mainly as reproductive parasites, with deleterious effects on host fitness. It is becoming clear, however, that, frequently, these symbionts also have beneficial effects on host fitness, either along with reproductive parasitism or not. Using the examples of cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) and male-killing (MK), we here analyze the effect of direct fitness benefits on the evolution of reproductive parasites. By means of a simple theoretical framework, we synthesize and extend earlier modeling approaches for CI and MK, which usually ignore fitness benefits...
December 13, 2017: Heredity
Johanna E Fraser, Jyotika Taneja De Bruyne, Iñaki Iturbe-Ormaetxe, Justin Stepnell, Rhiannon L Burns, Heather A Flores, Scott L O'Neill
Wolbachia pipientis from Drosophila melanogaster (wMel) is an endosymbiotic bacterium that restricts transmission of human pathogenic flaviviruses and alphaviruses, including dengue, Zika, and chikungunya viruses, when introduced into the mosquito vector Aedes aegypti. To date, wMel-infected Ae. aegypti have been released in field trials in 5 countries to evaluate the effectiveness of this strategy for disease control. Despite the success in establishing wMel-infected mosquitoes in wild populations, and the well-characterized antiviral capabilities of wMel, transinfecting different or additional Wolbachia strains into Ae...
December 2017: PLoS Pathogens
Kopal Singhal, Sujata Mohanty
Multiple toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are housed in different locations within the bacterial genome and are known to be associated with various cellular processes and stress-related adaptation. In endosymbionts, although, the TA system has scarce occurrence but studies have highlighted its presence in enhancing host-symbiont interactions. Wolbachia, an obligate endosymbiont, has recently been proposed as a biocontrol agent which may be helpful in controlling vector-borne diseases. There are reports suggesting the role of TA system in inducing cytoplasmic incompatibility in case of Wolbachia, however, the underlying mechanism is still not known...
December 6, 2017: Molecular Genetics and Genomics: MGG
William R Conner, Mark L Blaxter, Gianfranco Anfora, Lino Ometto, Omar Rota-Stabelli, Michael Turelli
Wolbachia endosymbionts may be acquired by horizontal transfer, by introgression through hybridization between closely related species, or by cladogenic retention during speciation. All three modes of acquisition have been demonstrated, but their relative frequency is largely unknown. Drosophila suzukii and its sister species D. subpulchrella harbor Wolbachia , denoted w Suz and w Spc, very closely related to w Ri, identified in California populations of D. simulans . However, these variants differ in their induced phenotypes: w Ri causes significant cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) in D...
November 2017: Ecology and Evolution
Karen B Barnard-Kubow, Laura F Galloway
Reproductive isolation is often variable within species, a phenomenon that while largely ignored by speciation studies, can be leveraged to gain insight into the potential mechanisms driving the evolution of genetic incompatibilities. We used experimental greenhouse crosses to characterize patterns of reproductive isolation among three divergent genetic lineages of Campanulastrum americanum that occur in close geographic proximity in the Appalachian Mountains. Substantial, asymmetrical reproductive isolation for survival due to cytonuclear incompatibility was found among the lineages (up to 94% reduction)...
November 2017: Ecology and Evolution
Evelyne Mann, Corinne M Stouthamer, Suzanne E Kelly, Monika Dzieciol, Martha S Hunter, Stephan Schmitz-Esser
Cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) is an intriguing, widespread, symbiont-induced reproductive failure that decreases offspring production of arthropods through crossing incompatibility of infected males with uninfected females or with females infected with a distinct symbiont genotype. For years, the molecular mechanism of CI remained unknown. Recent genomic, proteomic, biochemical, and cell biological studies have contributed to understanding of CI in the alphaproteobacterium Wolbachia and implicate genes associated with the WO prophage...
November 2017: MSystems
Heverton Leandro Carneiro Dutra, Silvia Lomeu Rodrigues, Simone Brutman Mansur, Sofia Pimenta de Oliveira, Eric Pearce Caragata, Luciano Andrade Moreira
The endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia spreads rapidly through populations of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, and strongly inhibits infection with key human pathogens including the dengue and Zika viruses. Mosquito control programs aimed at limiting transmission of these viruses are ongoing in multiple countries, yet there is a dearth of mass rearing infrastructure specific to Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes. One example is the lack of a blood meal substitute, which accounts for the Wolbachia-specific physiological changes in infected mosquitoes, that allows the bacterium to spread, and block viral infections...
November 16, 2017: Scientific Reports
Muhammad Sajjad Sarwar, Nusrat Jahan, Fatima Shahbaz
The gram-negative, pleomorphic endosymbiont Wolbachia is known to infect a large number of insects and other arthropods naturally. This bacterium modifies the host biology, mainly causing reproductive alterations including feminization, death of male, parthenogenesis, and importantly cytoplasmic incompatibility. Wolbachia-induced cytoplasmic incompatibility results in nonviable offspring and vector population suppression. In addition, this bacterium rapidly spreads and propagates within the host population...
October 23, 2017: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Sha He, Xianghong Zhang, Juhua Liang, Sanyi Tang
Endosymbiotic Wolbachia bacteria are widely applied for the control of dengue fever by manipulating the reproductive mechanism of mosquitoes, including maternal inheritance and cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI). CI means that the offsprings from the matings between Wolbachia infected males and uninfected females can not be hatched. At present, CI effect is assumed as a constant in most of dynamic systems for the spread of Wolbachia. However, their spread may arouse the evolution of mosquitoes to resist CI. Thus, a multiscale model combining a birth-pulse model with a gene-induced discrete model for the frequencies of alleles is proposed to describe the spread of Wolbachia in mosquito population with resistance allele of CI...
October 24, 2017: Scientific Reports
A Pedro Gonçalves, Jens Heller, Asen Daskalov, Arnaldo Videira, N Louise Glass
Cell death occurs in all domains of life. While some cells die in an uncontrolled way due to exposure to external cues, other cells die in a regulated manner as part of a genetically encoded developmental program. Like other eukaryotic species, fungi undergo programmed cell death (PCD) in response to various triggers. For example, exposure to external stress conditions can activate PCD pathways in fungi. Calcium redistribution between the extracellular space, the cytoplasm and intracellular storage organelles appears to be pivotal for this kind of cell death...
2017: Frontiers in Microbiology
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