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Physiology review

Tessa Brabander, Jaap Teunissen, Dik Kwekkeboom
PURPOSE: Physiological uptake in the uncinate process or pancreatic head has been described with Ga-labeled PET tracers for somatostatin receptor imaging. In-DTPA-octreotide is the only registered radiopharmaceutical for the imaging of neuroendocrine tumors. We studied the uptake in this region of the pancreatic head on somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) using In-DTPA-octreotide in a large group of patients. Furthermore, known physiological and clinical characteristics are discussed in an attempt to elucidate this phenomenon...
October 21, 2016: Clinical Nuclear Medicine
Ana Coito, Christoph M Michel, Pieter van Mierlo, Serge Vulliemoz, Gijs Plomp
: The importance of functional brain connectivity to study physiological and pathological brain activity has been widely recognized. Here, we aimed to 1) review a methodological pipeline to investigate directed functional connectivity between brain regions using source signals derived from high-density EEG; 2) elaborate on some methodological challenges; 3) apply this pipeline to temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients and healthy controls to investigate directed functional connectivity differences in the theta and beta frequency bands during EEG epochs without visible pathological activity...
October 20, 2016: IEEE Transactions on Bio-medical Engineering
M C Gouveia, J P Vella, F R Cafeo, F L Affonso Fonseca, M R Bacci
OBJECTIVE: Irisin is a muscle-secreted protein released into the circulation by cleavage of fibronectin type III domain containing protein 5(FNDC5). Since its discovery in 2012, it has been the subject of many researches due to its physiological role. It is believed that understanding irisin's function may be the key to comprehend many diseases and their development. The aim of this study is to perform a systematic review in order to establish whether there is an association of irisin's levels with obesity, diabetes mellitus, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, chronic kidney disease and cancer in terms of prognosis...
October 2016: European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences
Manickam Sugumaran, Hanine Barek
Animals synthesize melanin pigments for the coloration of their skin and use it for their protection from harmful solar radiation. Insects use melanins even more ingeniously than mammals and employ them for exoskeletal pigmentation, cuticular hardening, wound healing and innate immune responses. In this review, we discuss the biochemistry of melanogenesis process occurring in higher animals and insects. A special attention is given to number of aspects that are not previously brought to light: (1) the molecular mechanism of dopachrome conversion that leads to the production of two different dihydroxyindoles; (2) the role of catecholamine derivatives other than dopa in melanin production in animals; (3) the critical parts played by various biosynthetic enzymes associated with insect melanogenesis; and (4) the presence of a number of important gaps in both melanogenic and sclerotinogenic pathways...
October 20, 2016: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Manuel Martinez, Maria Estrella Santamaria, Mercedes Diaz-Mendoza, Ana Arnaiz, Laura Carrillo, Felix Ortego, Isabel Diaz
This review deals with phytocystatins, focussing on their potential role as defence proteins against phytophagous arthropods. Information about the evolutionary, molecular and biochemical features and inhibitory properties of phytocystatins are presented. Cystatin ability to inhibit heterologous cysteine protease activities is commented on as well as some approaches of tailoring cystatin specificity to enhance their defence function towards pests. A general landscape on the digestive proteases of phytophagous insects and acari and the remarkable plasticity of their digestive physiology after feeding on cystatins are highlighted...
October 20, 2016: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
M Cebová, M Košútová, O Pecháňová
Gasotransmitters represent a subfamily of the endogenous gaseous signaling molecules that include nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO), and hydrogen sulphide (H(2)S). These particular gases share many common features in their production and function, but they fulfill their physiological tasks in unique ways that differ from those of classical signaling molecules found in tissues and organs. These gasotransmitters may antagonize or potentiate each other's cellular effects at the level of their production, their downstream molecular targets and their direct interactions...
October 24, 2016: Physiological Research
S Cacanyiova, A Berenyiova, F Kristek
Cardiovascular studies have confirmed that hydrogen sulphide (H(2)S) is involved in various signaling pathways in both physiological and pathological conditions, including hypertension. In contrast to nitric oxide (NO), which has a clear vasorelaxant action, H(2)S has both vasorelaxing and vasoconstricting effects on the cardiovascular system. H(2)S is an important antihypertensive agent, and the reduced production of H(2)S and the alterations in its functions are involved in the initiation of spontaneous hypertension...
October 24, 2016: Physiological Research
Jason Gandhi, Gautam Dagur, Kelly Warren, Noel Smith, Sardar Ali Khan
BACKGROUND: Diabetes mellitus is a vastly prevalent metabolic disorder with escalating global health concerns. Particularly when mismanaged, chronic micro- and macrovascular complications may highly impair physiological systems while immunodeficiency disposes us to infection. OBJECTIVE: We investigate infections, localized complications, and neoplasms of the genitourinary system secondary to the chronic complications of diabetes mellitus in males and females. METHOD: A comprehensive MEDLINE® search was guided using key words relevant to diabetes mellitus and the genitourinary system...
October 19, 2016: Current Diabetes Reviews
Pedro Alves Bezerra Morais, Renata Dalmaschio Daltoé, Heberth de Paula
The discovery of the importance of kinase activity and its relationship to the emergence and proliferation of cancer cells, due to changes in normal physiology, opened a remarkable pathway for the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia through intense search of drug candidates. Six Abl kinase inhibitors have received the US FDA approval as chronic myelogenous leukemia treatment, and continuous efforts in obtaining new, more effective and selective molecules are being carried out. Herein we discuss the mechanisms of Abl inhibition, structural features and ligand/protein interactions that are important for the design of new Abl kinase inhibitors...
October 24, 2016: Future Medicinal Chemistry
Mazen Al-Hommrani, Paramita Chakraborty, Shilpak Chatterjee, Shikhar Mehrotra
Cell, the basic unit of life depends for its survival on nutrients and thereby energy to perform its physiological function. Cells of lymphoid and myeloid origin are key in evoking an immune response against "self" or "non-self" antigens. The thymus derived lymphoid cells called T cells are a heterogenous group with distinct phenotypic and molecular signatures that have been shown to respond against an infection (bacterial, viral, protozoan) or cancer. Recent studies have unearthed the key differences in energy metabolism between the various T cell subsets, natural killer cells, dendritic cells, macrophages and myeloid derived suppressor cells...
2016: J Immunol Res Ther
Sana Iqbal, Erik G Hayman, Caron Hong, Jesse A Stokum, David B Kurland, Volodymyr Gerzanich, J Marc Simard
Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) typically carries a poor prognosis. Growing evidence indicates that overabundant production of nitric oxide (NO) may be responsible for a large part of the secondary injury that follows SAH. Although SAH modulates the activity of all three isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), the inducible isoform, NOS-2, accounts for a majority of NO-mediated secondary injuries after SAH. Here, we review the indispensable physiological roles of NO that must be preserved, even while attempting to downmodulate the pathophysiologic effects of NO that are induced by SAH...
2016: Brain Circulation
Nisha Panth, Keshav Raj Paudel, Kalpana Parajuli
Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) have been the prime cause of mortality worldwide for decades. However, the underlying mechanism of their pathogenesis is not fully clear yet. It has been already established that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a vital role in the progression of CVDs. ROS are chemically unstable reactive free radicals containing oxygen, normally produced by xanthine oxidase, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, lipoxygenases, or mitochondria or due to the uncoupling of nitric oxide synthase in vascular cells...
2016: Advances in Medicine
Pierre Santucci, Feriel Bouzid, Nabil Smichi, Isabelle Poncin, Laurent Kremer, Chantal De Chastellier, Michel Drancourt, Stéphane Canaan
Despite a slight decline since 2014, tuberculosis (TB) remains the major deadly infectious disease worldwide with about 1.5 million deaths each year and with about one-third of the population being latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiologic agent of TB. During primo-infection, the recruitment of immune cells leads to the formation of highly organized granulomas. Among the different cells, one outstanding subpopulation is the foamy macrophage (FM), characterized by the abundance of triacylglycerol-rich lipid bodies (LB)...
2016: Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology
Ana B García-Redondo, Andrea Aguado, Ana M Briones, Mercedes Salaices
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key signaling molecules that regulate vascular function and structure in physiological conditions. A misbalance between the production and detoxification of ROS increases oxidative stress that is involved in the vascular remodeling associated with cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension by affecting inflammation, hypertrophy, migration, growth/apoptosis and extracellular matrix protein turnover. The major and more specific source of ROS in the cardiovascular system is the NADPH oxidase (NOX) family of enzymes composed of seven members (NOX1-5, DUOX 1/2)...
October 20, 2016: Pharmacological Research: the Official Journal of the Italian Pharmacological Society
Benjamin Wooden, Nicolas Goossens, Yujin Hoshida, Scott L Friedman
Technologies such as genome sequencing, gene expression profiling, proteomic and metabolomic analyses, electronic medical records, and patient-reported health information have produced large amounts of data, from various populations, cell types, and disorders (big data). However, these data must be integrated and analyzed if they are to produce models or concepts about physiologic function or mechanisms of pathogenesis. Many of these data are available to the public, allowing researchers anywhere to search for markers of specific biologic processes or therapeutic targets for specific diseases or patient types...
October 20, 2016: Gastroenterology
Le Zhang, Yunshan Zhao, Zhipeng A Wang, Kunhua Wei, Bin Qiu, Chunhong Zhang, QiYan Wang-Müller, Minhui Li
ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: As a group of important medicine plants, Boschniakia rossica (Cham. et Schltdl) Fedtsch. and B. himalaica Thoms, which are the only two species in the genus Boschniakia (Orobanchaceae), have long been used in traditional Chinese medicine for their multiple therapeutic uses related to enhanced renal function, erectile dysfunction, defaecate and hepatoprotective. Additionally, the two species are also used as dietary supplements in wine, cosmetics, and other healthy food...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Ethnopharmacology
Li Yu, Ling Li, L Jeffrey Medeiros, Ken H Young
The NF-κB pathway, a critical regulator of apoptosis, plays a key role in many normal cellular functions. Genetic alterations and other mechanisms leading to constitutive activation of the NF-κB pathway contribute to cancer development, progression and therapy resistance by activation of downstream anti-apoptotic pathways, unfavorable microenvironment interactions, and gene dysregulation. Not surprisingly, given its importance to normal and cancer cell function, the NF-κB pathway has emerged as a target for therapy...
October 13, 2016: Blood Reviews
Helen E Vuong, Elaine Y Hsiao
Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a serious neurodevelopmental disorder that affects one in 45 children in the United States, with a similarly striking prevalence in countries around the world. However, mechanisms underlying its etiology and manifestations remain poorly understood. Although ASD is diagnosed based on the presence and severity of impaired social communication and repetitive behavior, immune dysregulation and gastrointestinal issues are common comorbidities. The microbiome is an integral part of human physiology; recent studies show that changes in the gut microbiota can modulate gastrointestinal physiology, immune function, and even behavior...
August 26, 2016: Biological Psychiatry
Alexander I Agoulnik, Irina U Agoulnik, Xin Hu, Juan Marugan
Relaxin is a small heterodimeric peptide hormone of the insulin/relaxin superfamily produced mainly in female and male reproductive organs. It has potent antifibrotic, vasodilatory, and angiogenic effects and regulates the normal function of various physiological systems. Preclinical studies and recent clinical trials have shown the promise of recombinant relaxin as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of cardiovascular and fibrotic diseases. However, there are universal drawbacks of peptide-based pharmacology which apply to relaxin: a short half-life in vivo requires its continuous delivery, there are high costs of production, storage and treatment, as well as the possibility of immune response...
October 23, 2016: British Journal of Pharmacology
Esmeralda Castillo-Rodriguez, Raul Fernandez-Prado, Catalina Martin-Cleary, Maria Soledad Pizarro-Sánchez, Maria Dolores Sanchez-Niño, Ana Belen Sanz, Beatriz Fernandez-Fernandez, Alberto Ortiz
The current categorization of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is based on biomarkers of the glomerular function (estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR) and injury (urinary albumin creatinine ratio, UACR) and provides information on the risk of death and of progression of kidney disease. However, there are gaps in knowledge regarding the risk stratification of elderly patients with eGFR 45-60 ml/min/1.73 m2 and of younger patients with higher eGFR but physiological albuminuria. In this regard, most of the kidney cell mass is composed of tubules...
October 22, 2016: Nephron
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