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Neural regeneration

Ding-Jun Hao, Cuicui Liu, Lingling Zhang, Bo Chen, Qian Zhang, Rui Zhang, Jing An, Jingjing Zhao, Mingmei Wu, Yi Wang, Alfred Simental, Baorong He, Hao Yang
The gradual deterioration following central nervous system (CNS) injuries or neurodegenerative disorders is usually accompanied by infiltration of degenerated and apoptotic neural tissue debris. A rapid and efficient clearance of these deteriorated cell products is of pivotal importance in creating a permissive environment for regeneration of those damaged neurons. Our recent report revealed that the phagocytic activity of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) can make a substantial contribution to neuronal growth in such a hostile environment...
October 14, 2016: Neurotherapeutics: the Journal of the American Society for Experimental NeuroTherapeutics
Nolan B Skop, Frances Calderon, Cheul H Cho, Chirag D Gandhi, Steven W Levison
Tissue engineering using stem cells is widely used to repair damaged tissues in diverse biological systems; however, this approach has met with less success in regenerating the central nervous system (CNS). In this study we optimized and characterized the surface chemistry of chitosan-based scaffolds for CNS repair. To maintain radial glial cell (RGC) character of primitive neural precursors, fibronectin was adsorbed to chitosan. The chitosan was further modified by covalently linking heparin using genipin, which then served as a linker to immobilize fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), creating a multifunctional film...
October 2016: Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine
Harun Najib Noristani, Jean Charles Sabourin, Hassan Boukhaddaoui, Emilie Chan-Seng, Yannick Nicolas Gerber, Florence Evelyne Perrin
BACKGROUND: Neurons have intrinsic capability to regenerate after lesion, though not spontaneously. Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes permanent neurological impairments partly due to formation of a glial scar that is composed of astrocytes and microglia. Astrocytes play both beneficial and detrimental roles on axonal re-growth, however, their precise role after SCI is currently under debate. METHODS: We analyzed molecular changes in astrocytes at multiple stages after two SCI severities using cell-specific transcriptomic analyses...
October 6, 2016: Molecular Neurodegeneration
Lauren N Russell, Kyle J Lampe
Millions of people suffer from damage or disease to the nervous system that results in a loss of myelin, such as through a spinal cord injury or multiple sclerosis. Diminished myelin levels lead to further cell death in which unmyelinated neurons die. In the central nervous system, a loss of myelin is especially detrimental because of its poor ability to regenerate. Cell therapies such as stem or precursor cell injection have been investigated as stem cells are able to grow and differentiate into the damaged cells; however, stem cell injection alone has been unsuccessful in many areas of neural regeneration...
2016: Cells, Tissues, Organs
Yan Zhao, Yuan Zuo, Jianming Jiang, Huibo Yan, Xiliang Wang, Hunjun Huo, Yulong Xiao
Spinal cord injury (SCI) comprises nerve and motor function disorders that may be caused by a variety of damaging factors and is challenging to treat. The aim of the present study was to investigate the regenerative effects of neural stem cell (NSC) transplantation combined with intraperitoneal injection of erythropoietin (EPO) on cross-sectional SCI in rats. A model of SCI was induced in 40 adult Wistar rats via the complete transection of the 10th thoracic vertebra (T10). The rats were allocated at random into 4 groups: Control, NSC, EPO and NSC + EPO groups (n=10 per group)...
October 2016: Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine
Ying Wang, Hua Jia, Wen-Yuan Li, Li-Xin Guan, Lingxiao Deng, Yan-Cui Liu, Gui-Bo Liu
The present study aimed to evaluate the molecular mechanisms underlying combinatorial bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) transplantation and chondroitinase ABC (Ch-ABC) therapy in a model of acellular nerve allograft (ANA) repair of the sciatic nerve gap in rats. Sprague Dawley rats (n=24) were used as nerve donors and Wistar rats (n=48) were randomly divided into the following groups: Group I, Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) control group (ANA treated with DMEM only); Group II, Ch-ABC group (ANA treated with Ch-ABC only); Group III, BMSC group (ANA seeded with BMSCs only); Group IV, Ch-ABC + BMSCs group (Ch-ABC treated ANA then seeded with BMSCs)...
October 2016: Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine
Dasfne Lee-Liu, Emilio E Méndez-Olivos, Rosana Muñoz, Juan Larraín
While an injury to the central nervous system (CNS) in humans and mammals is irreversible, amphibians and teleost fish have the capacity to fully regenerate after severe injury to the CNS. Xenopus laevis has a high potential to regenerate the brain and spinal cord during larval stages (47-54), and loses this capacity during metamorphosis. The optic nerve has the capacity to regenerate throughout the frog's lifespan. Here, we review CNS regeneration in frogs, with a focus in X. laevis, but also provide some information about X...
September 29, 2016: Neuroscience Letters
Tina Zimmermann, Floortje Remmers, Beat Lutz, Julia Leschik
Huntington's disease (HD) is characterized by fatal motoric failures induced by loss of striatal medium spiny neurons. Neuronal cell death has been linked to impaired expression and axonal transport of the neurotrophin BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor). By transplanting embryonic stem cell-derived neural progenitors overexpressing BDNF, we combined cell replacement and BDNF supply as a potential HD therapy approach. Transplantation of purified neural progenitors was analyzed in a quinolinic acid (QA) chemical and two genetic HD mouse models (R6/2 and N171-82Q) on the basis of distinct behavioral parameters, including CatWalk gait analysis...
October 11, 2016: Stem Cell Reports
Jessica Ratajczak, Annelies Bronckaers, Yörg Dillen, Pascal Gervois, Tim Vangansewinkel, Ronald B Driesen, Esther Wolfs, Ivo Lambrichts, Petra Hilkens
Within the field of tissue engineering, natural tissues are reconstructed by combining growth factors, stem cells, and different biomaterials to serve as a scaffold for novel tissue growth. As adequate vascularization and innervation are essential components for the viability of regenerated tissues, there is a high need for easily accessible stem cells that are capable of supporting these functions. Within the human tooth and its surrounding tissues, different stem cell populations can be distinguished, such as dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from human deciduous teeth, stem cells from the apical papilla, dental follicle stem cells, and periodontal ligament stem cells...
2016: Stem Cells International
Jieun Jung, Jong-Wan Kim, Ho-Jin Moon, Jin Young Hong, Jung Keun Hyun
Neural stem cells (NSCs) have a high potency for differentiation to neurons and glial cells for replacement of damaged cells and paracrine effects for the regeneration and remyelination of host axons. Dental pulp is known to have a potential to differentiate into neural-like cells; therefore, dental pulp may be used as an autologous cell source for neural repair. In this study, we selectively expanded stem cells from human dental pulp in an initial culture using NSC media under xeno- and serum-free conditions...
2016: Stem Cells International
Mikhail Paveliev, Keith K Fenrich, Mikhail Kislin, Juha Kuja-Panula, Evgeny Kulesskiy, Markku Varjosalo, Tommi Kajander, Ekaterina Mugantseva, Anni Ahonen-Bishopp, Leonard Khiroug, Natalia Kulesskaya, Geneviève Rougon, Heikki Rauvala
Chondroitin sulfate (CS) glycosaminoglycans inhibit regeneration in the adult central nervous system (CNS). We report here that HB-GAM (heparin-binding growth-associated molecule; also known as pleiotrophin), a CS-binding protein expressed at high levels in the developing CNS, reverses the role of the CS chains in neurite growth of CNS neurons in vitro from inhibition to activation. The CS-bound HB-GAM promotes neurite growth through binding to the cell surface proteoglycan glypican-2; furthermore, HB-GAM abrogates the CS ligand binding to the inhibitory receptor PTPσ (protein tyrosine phosphatase sigma)...
September 27, 2016: Scientific Reports
Hong-Ping Yu, Nan Zhang, Ting Zhang, Zi-Long Wang, Ning Li, Hong-Hai Tang, Run Zhang, Meng-Na Zhang, Biao Xu, Quan Fang, Rui Wang
Neurite outgrowth is an important process in neural regeneration and plasticity, especially after neural injury, and recent evidence indicates that several Gαi/o protein-coupled receptors play an important role in neurite outgrowth. The neuropeptide (NP)FF system contains two Gαi/o protein-coupled receptors, NPFF1 and NPFF2 receptors, which are mainly distributed in the central nervous system. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the NPFF system is involved in neurite outgrowth in Neuro 2A cells...
September 23, 2016: Peptides
Jiangbo Pu, Hanhui Xu, Yazhou Wang, Hongyan Cui, Yong Hu
Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a high-cost disability and may cause permanent loss of movement and sensation below the injury location. The chance of cure in human after SCI is extremely limited. Instead, neural regeneration could have been seen in animals after SCI, and such regeneration could be retarded by blocking neural plasticity pathways, showing the importance of neural plasticity in functional recovery. As an indicator of nonlinear dynamics in the brain, sample entropy was used here in combination with detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and Kolmogorov complexity to quantify functional plasticity changes in spontaneous EEG recordings of rats before and after SCI...
October 2016: Cognitive Neurodynamics
Min Young Lee, Seung-Hyun Bae, So-Young Chang, Jae-Hun Lee, Se-Hyung Kim, Jin-Chul Ahn, Phil-Sang Chung, Wesley Moy, Jae Yun Jung
Auditory neuropathy is a hearing disorder caused by impaired auditory nerve function. The lack of information about the pathophysiology of this disease limits early diagnosis and further treatment. Laser therapy is a novel approach to enhance nerve growth or induce axonal regeneration. We induced auditory neural degeneration sparing the sensory epithelium with local ouabain application in an animal model and observed the rescue effect of photobiomodulation (PBM), showing recovered auditory function and favorable histologic outcome...
September 22, 2016: Neuroscience Letters
Bi-Qin Lai, Ming-Tian Che, Bao-Ling Du, Xiang Zeng, Yuan-Huan Ma, Bo Feng, Xue-Chen Qiu, Ke Zhang, Shu Liu, Hui-Yong Shen, Jin-Lang Wu, Eng-Ang Ling, Yuan-Shan Zeng
Severe spinal cord injury (SCI) causes loss of neural connectivity and permanent functional deficits. Re-establishment of new neuronal relay circuits after SCI is therefore of paramount importance. The present study tested our hypothesis if co-culture of neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) gene-modified Schwann cells (SCs, NT-3-SCs) and TrkC (NT-3 receptor) gene-modified neural stem cells (NSCs, TrkC-NSCs) in a gelatin sponge scaffold could construct a tissue engineering neural network for re-establishing an anatomical neuronal relay after rat spinal cord transection...
December 2016: Biomaterials
You-Quan Ding, Wei-Ze Xie, Jian-Guo Qi
After peripheral nerve damage, injured or stressed primary sensory neurons (PSNs) transmitting pathological pain (pathopain) sensitize central nervous system (CNS) neural circuits and determine behavioral phenotypes of peripheral neuropathic pain (PNP). Therefore, phenotypic profiling of pathopain-transmitting PSNs is vital for probing and discovering PNP conditions. Following peripheral nerve injuries (PNIs), PNP might be potentially transmitted by distinct classes of damaged or stressed PSNs, such as axotomized PSNs without regeneration (axotomy-non-regenerative neurons), axotomized PSNs with accurate regeneration (axotomy-regenerative neurons), and spared intact PSNs adjacent to axotomized neurons (axotomy-spared neurons)...
September 24, 2016: Reviews in the Neurosciences
Sachin Kumar, Kaushik Chatterjee
Recent research suggests that graphene holds great potential in the biomedical field because of its extraordinary properties. Whereas initial attempts focused on the use of suspended graphene for drug delivery and bioimaging, more recent work has demonstrated its advantages for preparing substrates for tissue engineering and biomedical devices and products. Cells are known to interact with and respond to nanoparticles differently when presented in the form of a substrate than in the form of a suspension. In tissue engineering, a stable and supportive substrate or scaffold is needed to provide mechanical support, chemical stimuli, and biological signals to cells...
October 4, 2016: ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces
Jan Kriska, Pavel Honsa, David Dzamba, Olena Butenko, Denisa Kolenicova, Lucie Janeckova, Zuzana Nahacka, Ladislav Andera, Zbynek Kozmik, M Mark Taketo, Vladimir Korinek, Miroslava Anderova
The canonical Wnt signaling pathway plays an important role in embryogenesis, and the establishment of neurogenic niches. It is involved in proliferation and differentiation of neural progenitors, since elevated Wnt/β-catenin signaling promotes differentiation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NS/PCs(1)) towards neuroblasts. Nevertheless, it remains elusive how the differentiation program of neural progenitors is influenced by the Wnt signaling output. Using transgenic mouse models, we found that in vitro activation of Wnt signaling resulted in higher expression of β-catenin protein and Wnt/β-catenin target genes, while Wnt signaling inhibition resulted in the reverse effect...
September 19, 2016: Brain Research
Peng Jiang, Wenbin Deng
Astrocytes traditionally were thought to have merely a support function, but are now understood to be important regulators of neural development and function. The immature and mature astrocytes have stage-specific roles in neuronal development. However, it is largely unclear whether human astrocytes also serve stage-specific roles in oligodendroglial development. Owing to the broad and diverse roles of astroglia in the central nervous system, transplantation of astroglia also could be of therapeutic value in promoting regeneration after CNS injury or disease...
2016: Neurogenesis (Austin, Tex.)
Jin-Ning Song, Zun-Wei Liu, Long Sui, Bin-Fei Zhang, Yong-Lin Zhao, Xu-Dong Ma, Hua Gu
Delayed ischemic neurologic deficit after subarachnoid hemorrhage results from loss of neural cells. Nerve growth factor and its receptor TrkA may promote regeneration of neural cells, but their expression after subarachnoid hemorrhage remains unclear. In the present study, a rat model of subarachnoid hemorrhage was established using two injections of autologous blood into the cistern magna. Immunohisto-chemical staining suggested that the expression of nerve growth factor and TrkA in the cerebral cortex and brainstem increased at 6 hours, peaked at 12 hours and decreased 1 day after induction of subarachnoid hemorrhage, whereas the expression in the hippocampus increased at 6 hours, peaked on day 1, and decreased 3 days later...
August 2016: Neural Regeneration Research
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