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"preterm infants"

Jessica Chapman, Stephanie Marfurt, Julie Reid
This systematic review evaluates the effectiveness of delayed cord clamping in preterm infants on reducing postdelivery complications of anemia, hemodynamic instability, and the development of intraventricular hemorrhages. Interventions included varying durations of delayed cord clamping with and without cord milking as compared with immediate cord clamping, shorter delays in cord clamping, and delayed cord clamping without cord milking. A comprehensive search of randomized controlled trials, observational, cohort, and before-after studies was conducted between 1946 and 2015 in the electronic databases of Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, and Google Scholar...
October 2016: Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing
Hyung Nam Kim, Tami H Wyatt, Xueping Li, Mark Gaylord
Although parents of premature infants experience many challenges when transitioning home from the neonatal intensive care unit, healthcare providers and social support systems tend to focus on mothers and infants rather than fathers. Unfortunately, very little is known about paternal concerns and needs as compared with maternal ones. The lack of understanding about paternal needs may lead to inadequate designs of neonatal intensive care unit family support programs with less involved fathers, all of which contribute to increased burdens on mothers and poor health outcomes for their infants...
October 2016: Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2016: Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing
Marina Boykova
Transition from hospital to home is a complex and multidimensional phenomenon for parents of prematurely born infants (<37 weeks of gestation). The absence of a clear conceptualization of this particular transition coupled with the challenges parents have when they return home and higher costs of healthcare service usage postdischarge dictates the need for a better understanding of this phenomenon. A literature review was undertaken using Whittemore and Knafl's theoretical framework for integrative review as a guide...
October 2016: Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing
Megan O'Reilly, Bernard Thébaud
Preterm birth occurs in approximately 11 % of all births worldwide. Advances in perinatal care have enabled the survival of preterm infants born as early as 23-24 weeks of gestation. However, many are affected by bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD)-a common respiratory complication of preterm birth, which has life-long consequences for lung health. Currently, there is no specific treatment for BPD. Recent advances in stem cell research have opened new therapeutic avenues for prevention/repair of lung damage...
October 22, 2016: Cell and Tissue Research
Colm R Breatnach, Orla Franklin, Naomi McCallion, Afif El-Khuffash
Systemic hypoperfusion secondary to a patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is thought to only affect post-ductal vessels. In a prospective observational study of 51 preterm infants, we demonstrated that a persistent PDA by day 5-7 is associated with reversed diastolic flow in the brachiocephalic artery when compared with those without a PDA.
October 18, 2016: Journal of Pediatrics
Maria Elisabeth Moreira, Ana Paula Esteves Pereira, Saint Clair Gomes Junior, Ruth Guinsburg, Maria Fernanda Branco de Almeida, Silvana Granado Gama, Maria do Carmo Leal
BACKGROUND: Approximately 5-10 % of newborns require some form of resuscitationupon delivery; several factors, such as maternal abnormal conditions, gestational age and type of delivery could be responsible for this trend. This study aimed to describe the factors associated with the need for positive pressure ventilation (PPV) via a mask or endotracheal tube and the use of supplemental O2 in newborns with a gestational age greater than 34 weeks in Brazil. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional study and obtained data from the Birth in Brazil Survey...
October 17, 2016: Reproductive Health
Nathalie Charpak, Juan Gabriel Ruiz
Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) is a human-based care intervention devised to complement neonatal care for low birth weight and premature infants. Kangaroo position (skin-to-skin contact on the mother's chest) offers thermal regulation, physiological stability, appropriate stimulation and enhances bonding and breastfeeding. Kangaroo nutrition is based on breastfeeding and kangaroo discharge policy relies on family empowerment and early discharge in kangaroo position with close ambulatory follow-up. We describe how the evidence has been developed, and how it has been put into practice by means of direct preterm infants care and dissemination of the method, including training of KMC excellence centers in many countries not only in Latin America but worldwide...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology
R Pineda, R Guth, A Herring, L Reynolds, S Oberle, J Smith
OBJECTIVE: Very preterm infants hospitalized in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) experience alterations in sensory experiences. Defining types, timing and frequency of sensory-based interventions that optimize outcomes can inform environmental modifications. The objective of this study was to conduct an integrative review on sensory-based interventions used with very preterm infants in the NICU to improve infant and parent outcomes. STUDY DESIGN: The data sources include MEDLINE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library and Google Scholar...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Perinatology: Official Journal of the California Perinatal Association
Sonja C Sawh, Santosh Deshpande, Sandy Jansen, Christopher J Reynaert, Philip M Jones
CONTEXT: Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most frequent gastrointestinal emergency in neonates. The microbiome of the preterm gut may regulate the integrity of the intestinal mucosa. Probiotics may positively contribute to mucosal integrity, potentially reducing the risk of NEC in neonates. OBJECTIVE: To perform an updated systematic review and meta-analysis on the efficacy and safety of probiotics for the prevention of NEC in premature infants. DATA SOURCES: Structured searches were performed in: Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (all via Ovid, from 2013 to January 2015)...
2016: PeerJ
Christopher McPherson
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 19, 2016: Evidence-based Medicine
Kai König, Katelyn J Guy, Claudia A Nold-Petry, Charles P Barfield, Geraldine Walsh, Sandra M Drew, Alex Veldman, Marcel F Nold, Dan M Casalaz
Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is often complicated by pulmonary hypertension (PH). We investigated three biomarkers potentially suitable as screening markers for extremely preterm infants at risk of BPD-associated PH. In this prospective observational cohort study conducted in a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit, 83 preterm infants with BPD born <28 weeks gestation and still inpatients at 36 weeks corrected age received an echocardiogram and blood tests of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), troponin I, and YKL-40...
October 19, 2016: American Journal of Physiology. Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology
Roseanne J S Vliegenthart, Christine H Ten Hove, Wes Onland, Anton H L C van Kaam
BACKGROUND: Apnea of prematurity (AOP) is a common complication of preterm birth, for which caffeine is the first treatment of choice. In case of persistent AOP, doxapram has been advocated as an additional therapy. OBJECTIVE: To identify and appraise all existing evidence regarding efficacy and safety of doxapram use for AOP in infants born before 34 weeks of gestational age. METHODS: All studies reporting on doxapram use for AOP were identified by searching electronic databases, references from relevant studies, and abstracts from the Societies for Pediatric Research...
October 20, 2016: Neonatology
L De Rooy, H Hamdallah, S C Dyall
BACKGROUND & AIMS: Adequate supply of arachidonic (ARA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids is essential for brain development, and extremely preterm infants may be at risk of deficiency. Current levels of ARA and DHA given to extremely preterm infants and the amounts available for accretion have not been established, although recent evidence suggests DHA intake is at a level likely to lead to severe deficits. This study quantified the omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) intakes from all sources in the first six weeks of life of preterm infants in standard care...
October 8, 2016: Clinical Nutrition: Official Journal of the European Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
Dirk Bassler
Theoretically, administration of inhaled corticosteroids may allow for beneficial effects on the pulmonary system of infants with evolving or established bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) with a lower risk of undesirable side effects compared to systemic corticosteroids. However, before deciding whether to use inhaled corticosteroids for BPD in routine clinical practice, the available randomized study data need to be considered. Currently published systematic reviews from the Cochrane Collaboration conclude that there is no role for inhaled corticosteroids in neither prevention nor treatment of BPD outside clinical trials...
October 19, 2016: Journal of Maternal-fetal & Neonatal Medicine
Carmel T Collins, Jennifer Gillis, Andrew J McPhee, Hiroki Suganuma, Maria Makrides
BACKGROUND: Preterm infants start milk feeds by gavage tube. As they mature, sucking feeds are gradually introduced. Women who choose to breast feed their preterm infant are not always able to be in hospital with their baby and need an alternative approach to feeding. Most commonly, milk (expressed breast milk or formula) is given by bottle. Whether using bottles during establishment of breast feeds is detrimental to breast feeding success is a topic of ongoing debate. OBJECTIVES: To identify the effects of avoidance of bottle feeds during establishment of breast feeding on the likelihood of successful breast feeding, and to assess the safety of alternatives to bottle feeds...
October 19, 2016: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Evan J Anderson, Xavier Carbonell-Estrany, Maarten Blanken, Marcello Lanari, Margaret Sheridan-Pereira, Barry Rodgers-Gray, John Fullarton, Elisabeth Rouffiac, Pamela Vo, Gerard Notario, Fiona Campbell, Bosco Paes
BACKGROUND: Moderate-late preterm infants, 33-35 weeks' gestational age (wGA), are at increased risk for respiratory syncytial virus hospitalization (RSVH). OBJECTIVE: To quantify the burden of RSVH in moderate-late preterm infants. METHODS: A pooled analysis was conducted on RSVH from 7 prospective, observational studies in the Northern Hemisphere from 2000-2014. Infants' 33 -35 wGA without comorbidity born during the RSV season who did not receive RSV immunoprophylaxis were enrolled...
October 17, 2016: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal
MohammadBagher Hosseini, Heydar Ali Esmaili, Shahram Abdoli Oskouei, Morteza Gojazadeh, Ziba MokariYamchi, Vahideh Layegh, Leyla Emami, Amin MokariYamchi
BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate the freeze-thawing method in reducing viral load of cytomegalovirus (CMV) in breast milk of mothers of preterm infants. METHODS AND MATERIALS: In this study, 169 nursing mothers of preterm infants were evaluated serologically for CMV infection. We found 29 (17.15%) nursing mothers who had serologic evidence of CMV infections consistent with recent infection (N = 2, IgG + IgM +) or prior infection (N = 27 IgG + IgM-)...
October 18, 2016: Breastfeeding Medicine: the Official Journal of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine
Vildan Kaya, Aynur Aytekin
AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To determine the effects of pacifier use on transition to full breastfeeding and sucking skills in preterm infants. BACKGROUND: Feeding problems in preterm infants cause delays in hospital discharge, extend mother-infant reunification, and increase medical cost. Nutritive sucking skills of preterm infants may develop by improving non-nutritive sucking skills and increasing sucking experiences. DESIGN: A prospective, randomised controlled trial conducted in the Eastern Turkey...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Clinical Nursing
Malihe Asadollahi, Mahnaz Jabraeili, Majid Mahallei, Mohammad Asgari Jafarabadi, Sakine Ebrahimi
Introduction: Hospitalization in neonatal intensive care unit may leads to many stresses for premature infants. Since premature infants cannot properly process stressors, identifying interventions that reduce the stress level for them is seems necessary. The aim of present study was to compare the effects of Field massage and Gentle Human Touch (GHT) techniques on the urine level of cortisol, as an indicator of stress in preterm infants. Methods: This randomized, controlled clinical trial was carried out in Al-Zahra hospital, Tabriz...
September 2016: Journal of Caring Sciences
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