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Lachlan P James, Paul Comfort, Timothy J Suchomel, Vincent G Kelly, Emma M Beckman, G Gregory Haff
The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether weightlifting actions are a viable method for improving athletic performance amongst weaker, inexperienced lifters when compared to individuals with a greater power clean result, and hence weightlifting ability and experience. Two groups of males with distinctly different power clean performances (higher performance (HP): N = 8; BM = 78.1±4.0 kg; 1RM PC = 1.08±0.09 kgBM; lower performance (LP): N = 8; BM=82.6±14.0 kg; 1RM PC=0.78±0.1 kg·BM) and resistance training age (HP: resistance training experience=3...
March 14, 2018: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Jared M Dickinson, Andrew C D'Lugos, Marcus A Naymik, Ashley L Siniard, Amanda J Wolfe, Donald P Curtis, Matthew J Huentelman, Chad C Carroll
Aerobic (AE) and resistance exercise (RE) elicit unique adaptations in skeletal muscle that have distinct implications for health and performance. The purpose of this study was to identify the unique transcriptome response of skeletal muscle to acute AE and RE. In a counter-balanced, cross-over design, six healthy, recreationally active young men (27{plus minus}3y) completed acute AE (40 min cycling, ~70% maximal HR) and RE (8 sets, 10 reps, ~65% 1RM), separated by ~1wk. Muscle biopsies ( vastus lateralis) were obtained before and at 1 and 4h post exercise...
March 15, 2018: Journal of Applied Physiology
Naoki Kikuchi, Koichi Nakazato
Aim: To investigate the effect of push-up training with a similar load of to 40% of 1- repetition maximumal (1RM) bench press on muscle hypertrophy and strength gain in men. Methods: Eighteen male participants (age, 20.2 ± 0.73 years, range: 19-22 years, height: 169.8 ± 4.4 cm, weight: 64.5 ± 4.7 kg) were randomly assigned to one of two experimental groups: bench press at 40%1RM (bench-press group, n = 9) or push-ups with position adjusted (e.g. kneeling) to the same load of bench-press 40%1RM (push-up group, n = 9), performed twice per week for 8 weeks...
June 2017: Journal of Exercise Science and Fitness
Lydia K Caldwell, William H DuPont, Matthew K Beeler, Emily M Post, Emily C Barnhart, Vincent H Hardesty, John P Anders, Emily C Borden, Jeff S Volek, William J Kraemer
The purpose of this double-blind, placebo-controlled investigation was to examine the effects of a Korean Ginseng (GINST15) on measures of perception and physical performance following an acute bout of resistance exercise. Ten women (age: 38.7 ± 7.8 years; height: 1.64 ± 0.05 m; body mass: 76.0 ± 11.6 kg) and nine men (age: 41.2. ± 9.7 years; height: 1.77 ± 0.05 m; body mass: 88.5 ± 5.0 kg) completed the investigation. Participants were randomized to a three-cycle testing scheme consisting of high dose ginseng (HIGH: 960 mg/day), low dose ginseng (LOW: 160 mg/day) and placebo (PBO: 0 mg/day)...
March 2018: Journal of Sports Science & Medicine
Felipe Alves Brigatto, Tiago Volpi Braz, Thamires Cristina da Costa Zanini, Moisés Diego Germano, Marcelo Saldanha Aoki, Brad Jon Schoenfeld, Paulo Henrique Marchetti, Charles Ricardo Lopes
The purpose of this study was to investigate the chronic effects of training muscle groups 1 day per week vs. 2 days per week on neuromuscular performance and morphological adaptations in trained men with the number of sets per muscle group equated between conditions. Participants were randomly assigned in 2 experimental groups: 1 session·wk per muscle group (G1, n = 10), where every muscle group was trained once a week with 16 sets or 2 sessions·wk per muscle group (G2, n = 10), where every muscle group was trained twice a week with 8 sets per session...
March 6, 2018: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Victoria Flores, James Becker, Eric Burkhardt, Joshua Cotter
The back squat exercise is typically practiced with varying squat depths and barbell loads. However, depth has been inconsistently defined, resulting in unclear safety precautions when squatting with loads. Additionally, females exhibit anatomical and kinematic differences to males which may predispose them to knee joint injuries. The purpose of this study was to characterize peak knee extensor moments (pKEMs) at three commonly practiced squat depths of above parallel, parallel, and full depth, and with three loads of 0% (unloaded), 50%, and 85% depth-specific one repetition maximum (1RM) in recreationally active females...
March 6, 2018: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Sandro Bartolomei, Federico Nigro, Sandro Ruggeri, Ivan Malagoli Lanzoni, Simone Ciacci, Franco Merni, Eliahu Sadres, Jay R Hoffman, Gabriele Semprini
The purpose of the present study was to validate the ballistic push-up test performed with hands on a force plate (BPU) as a method to measure upper-body power. Twenty-eight experienced resistance trained men (age = 25.4 ± 5.2 y; body mass = 78.5 ± 9.0 kg; body height = 179.6 ± 7.8 cm) performed, two days apart, a bench press 1RM test and upper-body power tests. Mean power and peak power were assessed using the bench press throw test (BT) and the BPU test performed in randomized order. The area under the force/power curve (AUC) obtained at BT was also calculated...
March 6, 2018: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Jonas Verbrugghe, Anouk Agten, Bert O Eijnde, Enzo Olivieri, Xavier Huybrechts, Henk Seelen, Frank Vandenabeele, Annick Timmermans
BACKGROUND: Although low to moderate intensity exercise therapy is a predominant part of rehabilitation in nonspecific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP), effect sizes are small and optimal exercise modalities/intensities are unclear. Conversely, effects of high intensity training have not yet been investigated in this population. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of high intensity training (HIT) and to explore the magnitude of the effects of a HIT program may have on exercise capacity and disease related outcome measures compared to conventional therapy for persons with NSCLBP...
March 2, 2018: Journal of Back and Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation
Alicia En Ling Tan, Tiffany L Grisbrook, Novia Minaee, Sîan Williams
BACKGROUND: Isometric assessment of muscular function using a hand held dynamometer (HHD) is frequently used in clinic environments. However, there is controversy in terms of the validity of isometric assessment to monitor changes in dynamic performance. One repetition maximum (1RM) is considered the gold standard for evaluating dynamic strength, though clinician's do not often use 1RM testing, preferring to be cautious with clients who have pre-existing impairments. If strength testing using a HHD could be used to predict 1RM, this may have significant implications for the use of isometric testing to prescribe exercise in clinical environments...
March 5, 2018: PM & R: the Journal of Injury, Function, and Rehabilitation
Heikki Peltonen, Simon Walker, Anthony C Hackney, Janne Avela, Keijo Häkkinen
Maximum strength training induces various improvements in the rate of force development (RFD) on a group level, but no study has investigated inter-individual adaptations in RFD. Fourteen men (28 ± 6 years old) performed the same 10-week maximum strength and then a 10-week power training program. Maximal force and RFD were recorded during maximal isometric leg extension voluntary contractions repeatedly before every 7th training session (2 sessions/week). After the intervention, subjects were retrospectively divided into three groups based on their RFD improvements: (1) improved only during the maximum strength period (MS-responders, + 100 ± 35%), (2) improved only during the power period (P-responders, + 53 ± 27%) or (3) no improvement at all (non-responders, + 3 ± 9%)...
March 6, 2018: European Journal of Applied Physiology
Federica Patrizio, Massimiliano Ditroilo, Francesco Felici, Guglielmo Duranti, Giuseppe De Vito, Stefania Sabatini, Massimo Sacchetti, Ilenia Bazzucchi
PURPOSE: To examine the effect of acute quercetin (Q) ingestion on neuromuscular function, biomarkers of muscle damage, and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) in response to an acute bout of resistance training. METHODS: 10 young men (22.1 ± 1.8 years, 24.1 ± 3.1 BMI) participated in a randomized, double-blind, crossover study. Subjects consumed Q (1 g/day) or placebo (PLA) 3 h prior to a resistance training session which consisted of 3 sets of 8 repetitions at 80% of the one repetition maximum (1RM) completed bilaterally for eight different resistance exercises...
March 6, 2018: European Journal of Applied Physiology
Gederson K Gomes, Cristiane M Franco, Paulo Ricardo P Nunes, Fábio L Orsatti
We studied the effects of two different weekly frequency resistance training (RT) protocols over eight weeks on muscle strength and muscle hypertrophy in well-trained men. Twenty-three subjects (age: 26.2±4.2 years; RT experience: 6.9±3.1 years) were randomly allocated into the two groups: low frequency (LFRT, n = 12) or high frequency (HFRT, n = 11). The LFRT performed a split-body routine, training each specific muscle group once a week. The HFRT performed a total-body routine, training all muscle groups every session...
February 27, 2018: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Andrew D Vigotsky, Megan A Bryanton, Greg Nuckols, Chris Beardsley, Bret Contreras, Jessica Evans, Brad J Schoenfeld
Previous investigations of strength have only focused on biomechanical or psychological determinants, while ignoring the potential interplay and relative contributions of these variables. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relative contributions of biomechanical, anthropometric, and psychological variables to the prediction of maximum parallel barbell back squat strength. Twenty-one college-aged participants (male = 14; female = 7; age = 23 ± 3 years) reported to the laboratory for two visits...
February 27, 2018: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Irineu Loturco, Timothy Suchomel, Ronaldo Kobal, Ademir F S Arruda, Aristide Guerriero, Lucas A Pereira, Chi Nan Pai
This study examined the force-velocity relationship and tested the possibility of determining the relative loading intensity (% 1RM) in three different variations of prone row exercises. Thirty male top-level athletes from two different sports (National Team rugby union players and professional mixed martial arts fighters) were submitted to maximum dynamic strength assessments in the free prone bench pull, bent over barbell row, and bent over Smith-machine row, following standard procedures encompassing lifts performed from 40 to 100% of 1RM...
February 27, 2018: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
M Travis Byrd, Brian J Wallace, Jody L Clasey, Haley C Bergstrom
This study examined the contribution of lower body strength and isokinetic peak torque measures to the prediction of critical power (CP) and anaerobic work capacity (AWC). Fourteen recreationally trained males (mean ± SD age: 22.4 ± 2.5 yrs; height: 177.9 ± 7.7 cm; body mass: 84.2 ± 12.4 kg) with anaerobic training experience completed this study. The lower body strength measures included one repetition max (1RM) bilateral back squat [BSq], isokinetic peak torque at 30°·sec [PT30] and isokinetic peak torque at 240°·sec [PT240]) of the dominant leg...
February 27, 2018: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Liam J Hughes, Harry G Banyard, Alasdair R Dempsey, Brendan R Scott
The purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability and validity of predicting 1-repetition maximum (1RM) in trained individuals using a load-velocity relationship. Twenty strength-trained men (age: 24.3±2.9 years, height: 180.1±5.9 cm, body mass: 84.2±10.5 kg) were recruited and visited the laboratory on three occasions. The load-velocity relationship was developed using the mean concentric velocity of repetitions performed at loads between 20% and 90% 1RM. Predicted 1RM was calculated using 3 different methods discussed in existing research; minimal velocity threshold 1RM (1RMMVT), load at zero velocity 1RM (1RMLD0) and force-velocity 1RM methods (1RMFV)...
February 27, 2018: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Everton C do Carmo, Eduardo O De Souza, Hamilton Roschel, Ronaldo Kobal, Henrique Ramos, Saulo Gil, Valmor Tricoli
This study compared the effects of self-selected rest interval and fixed rest interval strategies on post-activation potentiation (PAP) in countermovement jump (CMJ) performance. Twelve strength-trained male's (age: 25.4 ± 3.6 years; body mass: 78.8 ± 10.5 kg; height: 175 ± 7.0 cm; half-squat 1RM: 188.7 ± 33.4 kg) performed three experimental conditions: 1) fixed rest interval (FRI: CMJ test; 4-min rest interval; 5RM back squat; 4-min rest interval; CMJ test), 2) self-selected rest interval (SSRI: CMJ test; 4-min rest interval; 5RM back squat; SSRI; CMJ test), and 3) control (C: CMJ test; 8-min rest interval; CMJ test)...
February 22, 2018: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Mark Chapman, Eneko Larumbe-Zabala, Mark Gosss-Sampson, N Travis Triplett, Fernando Naclerio
The present study analyzed the effectiveness of the OMNI-RES (0-10) and the electromyographic signal for monitoring changes in the movement velocity during a set to muscular failure performed with different relative loads in the bench press exercise (BP). Ten males (30.8 ± 5.7 years) were evaluated on eight separate days with 48 hours of rest between sessions. After determining the 1RM value, participants performed seven sets to failure with the following relative loads ranges: 30<40%; 40<50%, 50<60%, 60%<70%, 70<80%, 80<90% and >90%...
February 22, 2018: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Roland W J Hangelbroek, Pim Knuiman, Michael Tieland, Lisette C P G M de Groot
OBJECTIVES: Chronic systemic low grade inflammation is associated with the age-related loss of muscle mass. Resistance exercise has been suggested to reduce or lower chronic systemic low grade inflammation. However, systemic chronic low-grade inflammation may adversely affect the adaptive response to exercise training. We investigated the effect of resistance exercise training on systemic chronic low-grade inflammation in older adults. In addition, we studied the association between systemic chronic low-grade inflammation and the adaptive response to exercise training...
February 20, 2018: Experimental Gerontology
Jozo Grgic, Brad J Schoenfeld, Timothy B Davies, Bruno Lazinica, James W Krieger, Zeljko Pedisic
BACKGROUND: Current recommendations on resistance training (RT) frequency for gains in muscular strength are based on extrapolations from limited evidence on the topic, and thus their practical applicability remains questionable. OBJECTIVE: To elucidate this issue, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the studies that compared muscular strength outcomes with different RT frequencies. METHODS: To carry out this review, English-language literature searches of the PubMed/MEDLINE, Scopus, and SPORTDiscus databases were conducted...
February 22, 2018: Sports Medicine
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