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Richard M Schumacher, Jana L Arabas, Jerry L Mayhew, William F Brechue
The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of inter-investigator differences in anthropometric assessments on the prediction of one-repetition maximum (1RM) bench press in college football players. Division-II players (n = 34, age = 20.4 ± 1.2 y, 182.3 ± 6.6 cm, 99.1 ± 18.4 kg) were measured for selected anthropometric variables and 1RM bench press at the conclusion of a heavy resistance training program. Triceps, subscapular, and abdominal skinfolds were measured in triplicate by three investigators and used to estimate %fat...
2016: International Journal of Exercise Science
Clare F Heisey, J Derek Kingsley
Static stretching was once recognized as a method of preparation for physical activity that would inhibit performance and increase risk of injury. However, a growing body of research suggests that static stretching may not have an inhibitory effect. Regardless, the data have not examined gender differences or the fatigue index (FI) and flexibility effects of static stretching on the back squat over multiple sets. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between a static-stretch condition (SC) and control condition (CC) on flexibility and the FI of Division I female athletes during 4 sets of the back squat...
2016: International Journal of Exercise Science
Alex S Ribeiro, Brad J Schoenfeld, Steven J Fleck, Fábio L C Pina, Matheus A Nascimento, Edilson S Cyrino
The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of resistance training (RT) performed in a pyramid (PR) versus a traditional (TD) system on muscular strength, muscle mass, and hormonal responses in older women. Twenty-five older women (67.6 ± 5.1 years, 65.9 ± 11.1 kg, 154.7 ± 5.8 cm, and 27.5 ± 4.5 kg m) performed both a TD and PR system RT program in a balanced crossover design. The TD program consisted of 3 sets of 8-12 RM with a constant load for the 3 sets, whereas the PR system consisted of 3 sets of 12/10/8 RM with incrementally higher loads for each set...
September 23, 2016: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Paul Comfort, Robert Williams, Timothy J Suchomel, Jason P Lake
The aim of this study was to compare load-absorption force-time characteristics of the clean from the knee (CK), power clean from the knee (PCK) and clean pull from the knee (CPK). Ten collegiate athletes (age 27.5 ± 4.2 years; height 180.4 ± 6.7 cm; mass 84.4 ± 7.8 kg), performed three repetitions each of the CK, PCK and CPK with 90% of their 1RM power clean on a force platform. The CK load-absorption duration (0.95 ± 0.35 s) was significantly longer compared to the CPK (0.44 ± 0.15 s; p < 0.001, d = 2...
September 27, 2016: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Gerald T Mangine, Jay R Hoffman, Ran Wang, Adam M Gonzalez, Jeremy R Townsend, Adam J Wells, Adam R Jajtner, Kyle S Beyer, Carleigh H Boone, Amelia A Miramonti, Michael B LaMonica, David H Fukuda, Nicholas A Ratamess, Jeffrey R Stout
PURPOSE: To compare the effects of two different resistance training programs, high intensity (INT) and high volume (VOL), on changes in isometric force (FRC), rate of force development (RFD), and barbell velocity during dynamic strength testing. METHODS: Twenty-nine resistance-trained men were randomly assigned to either the INT (n = 15, 3-5 RM, 3-min rest interval) or VOL (n = 14, 10-12 RM, 1-min rest interval) training group for 8 weeks. All participants completed a 2-week preparatory phase prior to randomization...
October 15, 2016: European Journal of Applied Physiology
Marcelo Cardoso de Souza, Fábio Jennings, Hisa Morimoto, Jamil Natour
OBJECTIVE: The purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of a progressive muscle strengthening program using a Swiss ball for AS patients. METHODS: Sixty patients with AS were randomized into the intervention group (IG) or the control group (CG). Eight exercises were performed by the IG patients with free weights on a Swiss ball two times per week for 16 weeks. The evaluations were performed by a blinded evaluator at baseline and after 4, 8, 12 and 16 weeks using the following instruments: the one-repetition maximum test (1 RM), BASMI, BASFI, HAQ-S, SF-36, 6-minute walk test, Time Up and Go test, BASDAI, ASDAS, ESR and CRP dosage and Likert scale...
September 17, 2016: Revista Brasileira de Reumatologia
Frederico Ribeiro Neto, Patrícia Guanais, Guilherme H Lopes, Elisa Dornelas, Daniela de Campos Barbetta, Alessandra C B Coutinho, Carlos Wellington Gonçalves, Rodrigo Rodrigues Gomes Costa
OBJECTIVE: The study aimed to investigate the influence of strength values and fat mass on functional independence of men with different spinal cord injury levels (SCI). DESIGN: Cross-sectional study; Setting: SARAH Rehabilitation Hospital Network - Brasilia, Brazil. PARTICIPANTS: Forty-five men with SCI were enrolled in the study. INTERVENTIONS: Subjects were assessed in functional independence scales, one maximum repetition test (1RM) and body composition to detect absolute and relative strength: 1RM divided by body mass (BM) and lean body mass (LBM)...
October 4, 2016: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Christopher M Lockwood, Michael D Roberts, Vincent J Dalbo, Abbie E Smith-Ryan, Kristina L Kendall, Jordan R Moon, Jeffrey R Stout
OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to compare the chronic effects of different whey protein forms on body composition and performance when supplemented with resistance training. METHODS: Resistance-trained men (N = 56, 21.4 ± 0.4 years, 79.5 ± 1.0 kg) participated in an 8-week resistance training regimen (2 upper-body sessions and 2 lower-body sessions per week) and received one of 4 double-blinded treatments: 30 g/serving carbohydrate placebo (PLA) or 30 g/serving protein from either (a) 80% whey protein concentrate (WPC), (b) high-lactoferrin-containing WPC (WPC-L), or (c) extensively hydrolyzed WPC (WPH)...
October 6, 2016: Journal of the American College of Nutrition
Marco Antonio Soriano, Timothy J Suchomel, Pedro J Marín
BACKGROUND: External mechanical power is considered to be one of the most important characteristics with regard to sport performance. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this meta-analysis was to examine the effect of load on kinetic variables such as mean and peak power during bench press and bench press throw, thus integrating the findings of various studies to provide the strength and conditioning professional with more reliable evidence upon which to base their program design...
October 3, 2016: Sports Medicine
Paige E Rice, Courtney L Goodman, Christopher R Capps, N Travis Triplett, Travis M Erickson, Jeffrey M McBride
The purpose of this study was to compare force- and power-time curve variables during jumping between Division I strength-matched male and female basketball athletes. Males (n = 8) and females (n = 8) were strength matched by testing a one-repetition maximum (1RM) back squat. 1RM back squat values were normalised to body mass in order to demonstrate that strength differences were a function of body mass alone. Subjects performed three countermovement jumps (CMJ) at maximal effort. Absolute and relative force- and power-time curve variables from the CMJs were analysed between males and females...
October 1, 2016: European Journal of Sport Science
Marcelo R C Dias, Roberto Simao, Francisco J F Saavedra, Nicholas A Ratamess
The purpose of this study was to compare differences in muscle strength and self-selected resistance training intensities between trained subjects who trained under the supervision of a personal trainer (PT) and those who trained without supervision (WoPT). Twenty-one trained subjects, men (n = 12) and women (n = 9), completed three sessions (separated by 48 hours) in the following sequence: (1) self-selected intensity assessment consisting of performance of three sets of 10 repetitions for the leg press, bench press, leg extension, and arm curl exercises with self-selected load; (2) a one repetition-maximum (1RM) test to determine subjects' maximal strength in the four exercises; and (3) a 10 repetition-maximum (10RM) test to determine the maximum load completed for 10 repetitions for each exercise...
September 23, 2016: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Timothy J Suchomel, Jason P Lake, Paul Comfort
The purpose of this study was to compare the load absorption force-time characteristics of weightlifting catching and pulling derivatives. Twelve resistance-trained men performed repetitions of the hang power clean (HPC), jump shrug (JS), and hang high pull (HHP) on a force platform with 30, 45, 65, and 80% of their one repetition maximum (1RM) HPC. Load absorption phase duration, mean force, and work were calculated from the force-time data. The HHP produced a significantly longer load absorption phase duration compared to the HPC (p < 0...
September 21, 2016: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Harry G Banyard, Kazunori Nosaka, G Gregory Haff
This study investigated the reliability and validity of the load-velocity relationship to predict the free-weight back squat 1RM. Seventeen strength-trained males performed three 1RM assessments on three separate days. All repetitions were performed to full depth with maximal concentric effort. Predicted 1RMs were calculated by entering the mean concentric velocity of the 1RM (V1RM) into an individualized linear regression equation, which was derived from the load-velocity relationship of three (20, 40, 60% of 1RM), four (20, 40, 60, 80% of 1RM), or five (20, 40, 60, 80, 90% of 1RM) incremental warm-up sets...
September 21, 2016: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Nick W Bray, Rowan R Smart, Jennifer M Jakobi, Gareth R Jones
Frailty is a clinical geriatric syndrome caused by physiological deficits across multiple systems. These deficits make it challenging to sustain homeostasis required for the demands of everyday life. Exercise is likely the best therapy to reverse frailty status. Literature to date suggests that pre-frail older adults, those with 1-2 deficits on the Cardiovascular Health Study-Frailty Phenotype (CHS-frailty phenotype), should exercise 2-3 times a week, for 45-60 min. Aerobic, resistance, flexibility, and balance training components should be incorporated but resistance and balance activities should be emphasized...
October 2016: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Physiologie Appliquée, Nutrition et Métabolisme
Bahram Sangelaji, Mohammadreza Kordi, Farzaneh Banihashemi, Seyed Massood Nabavi, Sara Khodadadeh, Maryam Dastoorpoor
BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurological disease with a variety of signs and symptoms. Exercise therapy has been shown to improve physical functions in MS. However, questions about an optimal exercise therapy remain. In this regard, we suggest a combined exercise therapy including aerobic and resistance exercises for MS patients. The study is designed to observe, test and compare the effects of proposed combined exercises on strength, balance, agility, fatigue, speed, and walking distance in people with mild to moderate MS [0 < expanded disability status scale (EDSS) < 5]...
July 6, 2016: Iranian Journal of Neurology
Jonathan M Oliver, Anthony L Almada, Leighsa E Van Eck, Meena Shah, Joel B Mitchell, Margaret T Jones, Andrew R Jagim, David S Rowlands
Athletes in sports demanding repeat maximal work outputs frequently train concurrently utilizing sequential bouts of intense endurance and resistance training sessions. On a daily basis, maximal work within subsequent bouts may be limited by muscle glycogen availability. Recently, the ingestion of a unique high molecular weight (HMW) carbohydrate was found to increase glycogen re-synthesis rate and enhance work output during subsequent endurance exercise, relative to low molecular weight (LMW) carbohydrate ingestion...
2016: PloS One
Lachlan P James, Emma M Beckman, Vincent G Kelly, G Gregory Haff
PURPOSE: To determine whether the maximal strength, impulse and power characteristics of competitive mixed martial arts (MMA) athletes differ according to competition level. METHODS: Twenty-nine male semi-professional and amateur MMA competitors were stratified into either higher-level (HL) or lower-level (LL) performers on the basis of competition grade and success. The one-repetition maximum (1RM) squat was used to assess lower body dynamic strength, while a spectrum of impulse, power, force and velocity variables were evaluated during an incremental load jump squat...
September 15, 2016: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
Jacob E Earp, Robert U Newton, Prue Cormie, Anthony J Blazevich
INTRODUCTION: Tendon dynamics influence movement performance and provide the stimulus for long-term tendon adaptation. As tendon strain increases with load magnitude and decreases with loading rate, changes in movement speed during exercise should influence tendon strain. METHODS: Ten resistance-trained men [squat one repetition maximum (1RM) to body mass ratio: 1.65 ± 0.12] performed parallel-depth back squat lifts with 60% of 1RM load at three different speeds: slow fixed-tempo (TS: 2-s eccentric, 1-s pause, 2-s concentric), volitional-speed without a pause (VS) and maximum-speed jump (JS)...
2016: Frontiers in Physiology
Jane M Black, Eric J Stöhr, Keeron Stone, Christopher J A Pugh, Mike Stembridge, Rob Shave, Joseph I Esformes
Arterial wall mechanics likely play an integral role in arterial responses to acute physiological stress. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the impact of low and moderate intensity double-leg press exercise on common carotid artery (CCA) wall mechanics using 2D vascular strain imaging. Short-axis CCA ultrasound images were collected in 15 healthy men (age: 21 ± 3 years; stature: 176.5 ± 6.2 cm; body mass; 80.6 ± 15.3 kg) before, during, and immediately after short-duration isometric double-leg press exercise at 30% and 60% of participants' one-repetition maximum (1RM: 317 ± 72 kg)...
September 2016: Physiological Reports
Ilias Smilios, Konstantinos Sotiropoulos, Karolina Barzouka, Marios Christou, Savvas P Tokmakidis
PURPOSE: This study examined the acute effects of contrast loading on mechanical power output during bench-press throws in junior volleyball players. METHOD: Eleven males (age: 16.5±0.5 years) performed a contrast loading and a control protocol. The contrast protocol included the execution of 3 bench-throws with a 30% load of 1RM, after 3 min a conditioning set of 5 bench-throws with a 60% load of 1RM and after 3 and 5 min two more sets of 3 bench-throws with a 30% load of 1RM...
September 6, 2016: Pediatric Exercise Science
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