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hearing research

Helen Cullington, Padraig Kitterick, Lisa DeBold, Mark Weal, Nicholas Clarke, Eva Newberry, Lisa Aubert
Purpose: This research note describes a planned project to design, implement, and evaluate remote care for adults using cochlear implants and compare their outcomes with those of individuals following the standard care pathway. Method: Sixty people with cochlear implants will be recruited and randomized to either the remote care group or a control group. The remote care group will use new tools for 6 months: remote and self-monitoring, self-adjustment of device, and a personalized online support tool...
October 1, 2016: American Journal of Audiology
Esteban Alejandro Lopez, Orozimbo Alves Costa, Deborah Viviane Ferrari
Purpose: The purpose of this research note is to describe the development and technical validation of the Mobile Based Assistive Listening System (MoBALS), a free-of-charge smartphone-based remote microphone application. Method: MoBALS Version 1.0 was developed for Android (Version 2.1 or higher) and was coded with Java using Eclipse Indigo with the Android Software Development Kit. A Wi-Fi router with background traffic and 2 affordable smartphones were used for debugging and technical validation comprising, among other things, multicasting capability, data packet loss, and battery consumption...
October 1, 2016: American Journal of Audiology
Jill E Preminger, Ann M Rothpletz
Purpose: Hearing impairment (HI) is a chronic condition; thus, even with treatment, residual participation restrictions and activity limitations typically remain. Individuals must learn to self-manage their HI. The purpose of this research note is to review components of successful Internet-based self-management programs and to evaluate group auditory rehabilitation (AR) programs with varying content, in order to make recommendations for the design of future Internet-based self-management programs...
October 1, 2016: American Journal of Audiology
Naomi Priest, Laura Thompson, Tamara Mackean, Alison Baker, Elizabeth Waters
OBJECTIVE: Australian Indigenous children experience some of the most substantial health inequalities globally. In this context, research regarding their health and well-being has overemphasised physical illnesses with limited exploration of a diverse range of dimensions and determinants, particularly those based on Indigenous holistic understandings of health and well-being. This deficit-based approach has thus missed many strengths and assets of Indigenous children. This research aimed to gain insight into the perspectives of Indigenous children about their health and well-being in an urban setting in Australia...
October 21, 2016: Ethnicity & Health
Thomas J Hoffmann, Bronya J Keats, Noriko Yoshikawa, Catherine Schaefer, Neil Risch, Lawrence R Lustig
Age-related hearing impairment (ARHI), one of the most common sensory disorders, can be mitigated, but not cured or eliminated. To identify genetic influences underlying ARHI, we conducted a genome-wide association study of ARHI in 6,527 cases and 45,882 controls among the non-Hispanic whites from the Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) cohort. We identified two novel genome-wide significant SNPs: rs4932196 (odds ratio = 1.185, p = 4.0x10-11), 52Kb 3' of ISG20, which replicated in a meta-analysis of the other GERA race/ethnicity groups (1,025 cases, 12,388 controls, p = 0...
October 2016: PLoS Genetics
Robert P Ellis, Mauricio A Urbina, Rod W Wilson
Exponentially rising CO2 (currently ~400 μatm) is driving climate change and causing acidification of both marine and freshwater environments. Physiologists have long known that CO2 directly affects acid-base and ion regulation, respiratory function and aerobic performance in aquatic animals. More recently, many studies have demonstrated that elevated CO2 projected for end of this century (e.g. 800-1000 μatm) can also impact physiology, and have substantial effects on behaviours linked to sensory stimuli (smell, hearing and vision) both having negative implications for fitness and survival...
October 20, 2016: Global Change Biology
Bas P Hartel, Martijn J H Agterberg, Ad F Snik, Henricus P M Kunst, A John V Opstal, Arjan J Bosman, Ronald J E Pennings
OBJECTIVES: Usher syndrome is the leading cause of hereditary deaf-blindness. Most patients with Usher syndrome type IIa start using hearing aids from a young age. A serious complaint refers to interference between sound localization abilities and adaptive sound processing (compression), as present in today's hearing aids. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of advanced signal processing on binaural hearing, including sound localization. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: In this prospective study, patients were fitted with hearing aids with a nonlinear (compression) and linear amplification program...
October 19, 2016: Clinical Otolaryngology
E Schepers, L Bodar, J van Os, R Lousberg
BACKGROUND: There is evidence that experimentally elicited auditory illusions in the general population index risk for psychotic symptoms. As little is known about underlying cortical mechanisms of auditory illusions, an experiment was conducted to analyze processing of auditory illusions in a general population sample. In a follow-up design with two measurement moments (baseline and 6 months), participants (n = 83) underwent the White Noise task under simultaneous recording with a 14-lead EEG...
October 18, 2016: BMC Neuroscience
Matthew L Bush, Robin Thompson, Catherine Irungu, John Ayugi
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of live telemedicine applications in hearing amplification and cochlear implantation. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SELECTION: A systematic search was performed in PubMed, MEDLINE, PsychINFO, CINALH, and Web of Science to identify peer-reviewed research. Inclusion criteria were titles containing words from the search terms 1) audiology, otolaryngology, and hearing impairment, 2) rehabilitative methods, and 3) telemedicine...
October 12, 2016: Otology & Neurotology
Jijo Pottackal Mathai, Asha Yathiraj
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of the study was to explore the effect of intensity on speech perception in individuals with late-onset auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder (ANSD) by obtaining their performance-intensity (PI) function. Additionally, the study investigated the effect of PI function on aided speech perception. It was hypothesized that speech perception abilities of individuals with ANSD vary with intensity and may provide information regarding their aided performance. DESIGN: A factorial research design was used to obtain the PI function and aided performance...
October 13, 2016: Ear and Hearing
Kevin K Ohlemiller, Sherri M Jones, Kenneth R Johnson
Laboratory mice (Mus musculus) have become the major model species for inner ear research. The major uses of mice include gene discovery, characterization, and confirmation. Every application of mice is founded on assumptions about what mice represent and how the information gained may be generalized. A host of successes support the continued use of mice to understand hearing and balance. Depending on the research question, however, some mouse models and research designs will be more appropriate than others...
October 17, 2016: Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology: JARO
Christian Young, Allison Tong, Hasantha Gunasekera, Simone Sherriff, Deanna Kalucy, Peter Fernando, Jonathan C Craig
AIM: To describe the perspectives of health professionals and communities on an innovative health service delivery project, Hearing EAr health and Language Services (HEALS). HEALS was a government funded initiative to improve access to specialist ear, nose and throat and speech pathology services for Aboriginal families living in metropolitan areas. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 health-care professionals (clinicians, health service managers and Aboriginal health workers) and 16 care givers of children who participated in HEALS...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health
Colleen G Le Prell, Odile Clavier
Speech communication often takes place in noisy environments; this is an urgent issue for military personnel who must communicate in high-noise environments. The effects of noise on speech recognition vary significantly according to the sources of noise, the number and types of talkers, and the listener's hearing ability. In this review, speech communication is first described as it relates to current standards of hearing assessment for military and civilian populations. The next section categorizes types of noise (also called maskers) according to their temporal characteristics (steady or fluctuating) and perceptive effects (energetic or informational masking)...
October 12, 2016: Hearing Research
Wendy E D Piniak, David A Mann, Craig A Harms, T Todd Jones, Scott A Eckert
Sea turtles spend much of their life in aquatic environments, but critical portions of their life cycle, such as nesting and hatching, occur in terrestrial environments, suggesting that it may be important for them to detect sounds in both air and water. In this study we compared underwater and aerial hearing sensitivities in five juvenile green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) by measuring auditory evoked potential responses to tone pip stimuli. Green sea turtles detected acoustic stimuli in both media, responding to underwater stimuli between 50 and 1600 Hz and aerial stimuli between 50 and 800 Hz, with maximum sensitivity between 200 and 400 Hz underwater and 300 and 400 Hz in air...
2016: PloS One
Farzad Faraji-Khiavi, Rezvan Dashti, Seyyed-Jalal Sameni, Arash Bayat
INTRODUCTION: Hearing loss is one of the most disabling impairments. Using a hearing aid as an attempt to improve the hearing problem can positively affect the quality of life for these people. This research was aimed to assess satisfaction of hearing impaired patients with their hearing aids regarding the employed technology and style. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This descriptive-analytic cross-sectional research was conducted on 187 subjects with hearing loss who were using a hearing aid...
September 2016: Iranian Journal of Otorhinolaryngology
Ulrik Lyngs, Emma Cohen, Wallisen Tadashi Hattori, Martha Newson, Daniel T Levin
Previous research has found that the perceived brightness of a face can be distorted by the social category of race. Thus, Levin and Banaji (2006) found, in a U.S. sample, that faces of identical brightness were perceived to be lighter if they had stereotypical White American features than if they had Black American features. Here, we present 2 experiments conducted in Natal, Brazil, that extend this line of research. Experiment 1 tested if the brightness distortion effect would generalize to a Brazilian population...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance
Gurjit Singh, Stefan Launer
Hearing rehabilitation tends to focus on the influence of intraindividual factors and concepts such as readiness for change and health beliefs. In contrast, less is known about the role of social context and the potential role of significant others on hearing aid adoption. This explorative retrospective study investigated whether hearing aid adoption is associated with significant other attendance at audiology appointments. The study sample consisted of 33,933 and 27,031 individuals who attended appointments either alone or with a significant other, respectively (n = 60,964)...
October 12, 2016: Trends in Hearing
Paige C Fairchild, Aviva G Nathan, Michael Quinn, Elbert S Huang, Neda Laiteerapong
BACKGROUND: Diabetes and hypertension are chronic conditions for which over 90 % of patients require medication regimens that must be intensified over time. However, delays in intensification are common, and may be partially due to unrealistic patient expectations. OBJECTIVE: To explore whether patient expectations regarding their diabetes and hypertension are congruent with the natural history of these conditions. DESIGN: Qualitative analysis of semi-structured interviews...
October 11, 2016: Journal of General Internal Medicine
Hemanth Narayan Shetty, Vishal Koonoor
BACKGROUND: Past research has reported that children with repeated occurrences of otitis media at an early age have a negative impact on speech perception at a later age. The present study necessitates documenting the temporal and spectral processing on speech perception in noise from normal and atypical groups. OBJECTIVES: The present study evaluated the relation between speech perception in noise and temporal; and spectral processing abilities in children with normal and atypical groups...
November 2016: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
(no author information available yet)
With the issuance of this final rule, the Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration places three synthetic phenethylamines: 2-(4-iodo-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-N-(2-methoxybenzyl)ethanamine (25I-NBOMe; 2C-I-NBOMe; 25I; Cimbi-5), 2-(4-chloro-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-N- (2-methoxybenzyl)ethanamine (25C-NBOMe; 2C-C-NBOMe; 25C; Cimbi-82), and 2-(4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-N-(2-methoxybenzyl)ethanamine (25B- NBOMe; 2C-B-NBOMe; 25B; Cimbi-36), including their optical, positional, and geometric isomers, salts and salts of isomers, whenever the existence of such salts, isomers, and salts of isomers is possible, into schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act...
September 27, 2016: Federal Register
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