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"Functional movement"

Rachel Newby, Jane Alty, Peter Kempster
Mind-brain dualism has dominated historical commentary on dystonia, a dichotomous approach that has left our conceptual grasp of it stubbornly incomplete. This is particularly true of functional dystonia, most diagnostically challenging of all functional movement disorders, in which the question of inherent psychogenicity remains a focus of debate. Phenomenological signs considered in isolation lack the specificity to distinguish organic and nonorganic forms, and dystonia's variability has frustrated attempts to develop objective laboratory-supported standards...
October 18, 2016: Movement Disorders: Official Journal of the Movement Disorder Society
Carlo Dallocchio, Michele Tinazzi, Frederica Bombieri, Natale Arnó, Roberto Erro
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 15, 2016: Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics
Janan Abbas, Viviane Slon, Hila May, Nathan Peled, Israel Hershkovitz, Kamal Hamoud
BACKGROUND: The condition of paraspinal muscles is known to be associated with some variables such as age, gender, and low back pain. It is generally agreed that these muscles play an important role in the stability and functional movements of the lumbar vertebral column. Although spinal instability has been shown to play an essential role in degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS), the role of paraspinal muscles remains elusive. The main purpose of this study was to shed light on the relationship between the condition of paraspinal muscles and symptomatic DLSS...
October 10, 2016: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
C Ganos, M J Edwards, K P Bhatia
Traumatic injury to the nervous system may account for a range of neurologic symptoms. Trauma location and severity are important determinants of the resulting symptoms. In severe head injury with structural brain abnormalities, the occurrence of trauma-induced movement disorders, most commonly hyperkinesias such as tremor and dystonia, is well recognized and its diagnosis straightforward. However, the association of minor traumatic events, which do not lead to significant persistent structural brain damage, with the onset of movement disorders is more contentious...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
A Fasano, M Tinazzi
Functional movement disorders (FMDs) affecting the eyelids, tongue, and other facial muscles are often underrecognized because their phenomenology has not been fully characterized. Nevertheless, these disorders are more common than previously thought. In this chapter we will discuss the phenomenology as well as the clinical and instrumental diagnosis of facial FMDs. Facial FMDs should be considered when a patient exhibits any combination of the following features: (1) fixed unilateral facial contractions, especially with lower lip, with or without ipsilateral jaw involvement, of maximal severity at onset; (2) inconsistent features such as changes in side and pattern during or between examination; (3) associated somatoform or nonphysiologic sensory or motor findings; (4) reduction or abolition of facial spasm with distraction; (5) response to suggestion or psychotherapy; (6) rapid onset and/or spontaneous remissions; and (7) normal neurologic examination...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
D Kaski, A M Bronstein
Functional (psychogenic) eye movement disorders are perhaps less established in the medical literature than other types of functional movement disorders. Patients may present with ocular symptoms (e.g., blurred vision or oscillopsia) or functional eye movements may be identified during the formal examination of the eyes in patients with other functional disorders. Convergence spasm is the most common functional eye movement disorder, but functional gaze limitation, functional eye oscillations (also termed "voluntary nystagmus"), and functional convergence paralysis may be underreported...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
J Stone, M Vermeulen
Functional (psychogenic) sensory symptoms are those in which the patient genuinely experiences alteration or absence of normal sensation in the absence of neurologic disease. The hallmark of functional sensory symptoms is the presence of internal inconsistency revealing a pattern of symptoms governed by abnormally focused attention. In this chapter we review the history of this area, different clinical presentations, diagnosis (including sensitivity of diagnostic tests), treatment, experimental studies, and prognosis...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
Y E M Dreissen, D C Cath, M A J Tijssen
Functional jerks are among the most common functional movement disorders. The diagnosis of functional jerks is mainly based on neurologic examination revealing specific positive clinical signs. Differentiation from other jerky movements, such as tics, organic myoclonus, and primary paroxysmal dyskinesias, can be difficult. In support of a functional jerk are: acute onset in adulthood, precipitation by a physical event, variable, complex, and inconsistent phenomenology, suggestibility, distractibility, entrainment and a Bereitschaftspotential preceding the movement...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
P Schwingenschuh, G Deuschl
Functional tremor is the commonest reported functional movement disorder. A confident clinical diagnosis of functional tremor is often possible based on the following "positive" criteria: a sudden tremor onset, unusual disease course, often with fluctuations or remissions, distractibility of the tremor if attention is removed from the affected body part, tremor entrainment, tremor variability, and a coactivation sign. Many patients show excessive exhaustion during examination. Other somatizations may be revealed in the medical history and patients may show additional functional neurologic symptoms and signs...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
C Gasca-Salas, A E Lang
The diagnosis of functional neurologic disorders can be challenging. In this chapter we review the diagnostic criteria and rating scales reported for functional/psychogenic sensorimotor disturbances, psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) and functional movement disorders (FMD). A recently published scale for sensorimotor signs has some limitations, but may help in the diagnosis, and four motor and two sensory signs have been reported as highly reliable. There is good evidence using eight specific signs for the differentiation of PNES from seizures...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
M-P Stenner, P Haggard
Patients with functional movement disorders (FMD) experience movements as involuntary that share fundamental characteristics with voluntary actions. This apparent paradox raises questions regarding the possible sources of a subjective experience of action. In addition, it poses a yet unresolved diagnostic challenge, namely how to describe or even quantify this experience in a scientifically and clinically useful way. Here, we describe recent experimental approaches that have shed light on the phenomenology of action in FMD...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
Terry Trinh, Christine T Shiner, Angelica G Thompson-Butel, Penelope A McNulty
PURPOSE: Post-stroke hemiparesis may manifest as asymmetric gait, poor balance, and inefficient movement patterns. We investigated improvements in lower-limb muscle activation and function during Wii-based Movement Therapy (WMT), a rehabilitation program specifically targeting upper-limb motor-function. METHODS: Electromyography (EMG) was recorded bilaterally from tibialis anterior (TA) in 20 stroke patients during a 14-day WMT program. EMG amplitude and burst duration were analyzed during stereotypical movement sequences of WMT activities...
October 9, 2016: Disability and Rehabilitation
Cassie Wilson, Oliver J Perkin, Miranda P McGuigan, Keith A Stokes
The aim of this study was to determine the effect of aging on power generation and joint coordination during a leg press, in order to increase understanding of how functional movements are affected during the aging process. 44 older and 24 younger adults performed eight sub-maximal power repetitions on a seated leg press dynamometer. Peak power and velocity (at 40% maximum resistance) were measured along with the coordination (coupling angle) of the lower limb joints using the vector coding technique. The younger adults produced significantly greater peak power than the older adults (mean ± SD; 762 W ± 245 vs 361 W ± 162, p < 0...
2016: PloS One
Jonathan Hoffman, C Philip Gabel
Background: Over recent decades, mind-body exercise methods have gained international popularity and importance in the management of musculoskeletal disorders. Objectives: The scope of this paper was to investigate: the origins of Western mind-body methods, their philosophies, exercises, and relationship with mainstream healthcare over the last two centuries. Major findings: Within a few decades of the turn of the 20th century, a cluster of mind-body exercise methods emerged from at least six pioneering founders: Checkley, Müller, Alexander, Randell, Pilates, and Morris...
November 2, 2015: Physical Therapy Reviews: PTR
David M Frost, Tyson A C Beach, Troy L Campbell, Jack P Callaghan, Stuart M McGill
OBJECTIVE: To examine whether objective measures of spine and frontal plane knee motion exhibited during Functional Movement Screen™ (FMS) task performance changed following a movement-guided fitness (MOV) and conventional fitness (FIT) exercise intervention. DESIGN: Secondary analysis of a randomized controlled experiment. Before and after 12 weeks of exercise, participants' kinematics were quantified while performing the FMS and a series of general whole-body movement tasks...
June 7, 2016: Physical Therapy in Sport
Suzi Edwards, Hiram C Brooke, Jill L Cook
OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to explore the differences in the magnitude of movement variability and strategies utilized during an unanticipated cut task between players with and without a history of groin pain. DESIGN: Cross-sectional design. SETTING: Biomechanics laboratory. PARTICIANTS: Male Australian football players with (HISTORY; n = 7) or without (CONTROL; n = 10) a history of groin pain. OUTCOME MEASURES: Three-dimensional ground reaction forces (GRF) and kinematics were recorded during 10 successful trials of an unanticipated cut task, and isokinetic hip adduction and abduction strength...
July 22, 2016: Physical Therapy in Sport
Deydre S Teyhen, Daniel I Rhon, Robert J Butler, Scott W Shaffer, Stephen L Goffar, Danny J McMillian, Robert E Boyles, Kyle B Kiesel, Phillip J Plisky
CONTEXT:  Although inactivity, being overweight, smoking, and a history of injury are identified as risk factors for poor health and injury, few authors have examined their association on physical performance. Young adults may be more likely to adopt healthier lifestyles if they understand the effect of health behaviors on performance. OBJECTIVE:  To determine the association of being overweight, smoking, inactivity, and a history of injury with physical performance...
October 3, 2016: Journal of Athletic Training
Patrícia Graef, Stella M Michaelsen, Maria L R Dadalt, Daiana A M S Rodrigues, Franciele Pereira, Aline S Pagnussat
Objective: To investigate the effects of functional strengthening (using functional movements) and analytical strengthening (using repetitive movements) on level of activity and muscular strength gain in patients with chronic hemiparesis after stroke. Method: A randomized, assessor-blinded trial was conducted in a therapist-supervised home rehabilitation program. Twenty-seven patients with chronic stroke were randomly allocated one of two groups: functional strengthening (FS) (n=13) and analytical strengthening (AS) (n=14)...
September 16, 2016: Brazilian Journal of Physical Therapy
Garrett S Bullock Spt, Nate Brookerson, Amy M Knab, Robert J Butler
Abnormal fundamental movement patterns and upper quarter dynamic balance are proposed mechanisms affecting athletic performance and injury risk. There are few studies investigating functional movement and closed chain upper extremity dynamic stability in swimmers. The purpose of this study was to determine differences in fundamental movement competency and closed chain upper extremity dynamic balance, utilizing the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) and Upper Quarter Y-Balance Test (YBT-UQ), of high school (HS; n=70) and collegiate (COL; n=70) swimmers...
September 16, 2016: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Susan K Effgen, Sarah Westcott McCoy, Lisa A Chiarello, Lynn M Jeffries, Catherine Starnes, Heather M Bush
PURPOSE: To describe School Function Assessment (SFA) outcomes after 6 months of school-based physical therapy and the effects of age and gross motor function on outcomes. METHODS: Within 28 states, 109 physical therapists and 296 of their students with disabilities, ages 5 to 12 years, participated. After training, therapists completed 10 SFA scales on students near the beginning and end of the school year. RESULTS: Criterion scores for many students remained stable (46%-59%) or improved (37%-51%) with the most students improving in Participation and Maintaining/Changing Positions...
2016: Pediatric Physical Therapy
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