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"Functional movement"

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27904795/the-nine-test-screening-battery-normative-values-on-a-group-of-recreational-athletes
#1
Frida Flodström, Annette Heijne, Mark E Batt, Anna Frohm
BACKGROUND: A variety of risk factors predispose athletes to injury, such as impaired neuromuscular control, insufficient core stability, and muscular imbalances. The goal of assessing functional movement patterns is to detect imbalances and correct them with prevention strategies and thereby decrease injuries, and improve performance and quality of life. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to generate normative values for the 'Nine Test Screening Battery' (9TSB) in a group of recreational athletes...
December 2016: International Journal of Sports Physical Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27900187/mobility-proprioception-strength-and-fms-as-predictors-of-injury-in-professional-footballers
#2
Jonathan Yeung, Andrew Cleves, Hywell Griffiths, Len Nokes
BACKGROUND: The premise of this study was to investigate if anthropometric variables such as mobility, proprioception, strength and modified Functional Movement Screen (mFMS) could be used as primary indicators of injury risk in an English Championship division football team. This study focused on moderate injuries occurring in the lower extremities, during the 2014/2015 competitive season. METHODS: To differentiate between minor, moderate and severe injuries, this study classified moderate injuries as an injury with an average injury severity of 2-28 days...
2016: BMJ Open Sport & Exercise Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27885163/clinically-important-difference-of-the-arm-motor-ability-test-in-stroke-survivors
#3
George Fulk, Rebecca Martin, Stephen J Page
BACKGROUND: The Arm Motor Ability Test (AMAT) is used to assess and quantify upper-extremity (UE) functional limitation in stroke and other conditions. However, the AMAT score change indicative of important and clinically meaningful change has not been determined. OBJECTIVE: To determine the clinically important difference (CID) for the AMAT for individuals with stroke exhibiting mild to moderate hemiparesis. METHODS: A total of 146 chronic stroke survivors exhibiting stable, mild to moderate UE hemiparesis were administered the AMAT before and after interventions targeting their affected UEs...
November 23, 2016: Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27871235/development-of-the-interrai-home-care-frailty-scale
#4
John N Morris, Elizabeth P Howard, Knight R Steel
BACKGROUND: The concept of frailty, a relative state of weakness reflecting multiple functional and health domains, continues to receive attention within the geriatrics field. It offers a summary of key personal characteristics, providing perspective on an individual's life course. There have been multiple attempts to measure frailty, some focusing on physiologic losses, others on specific diseases, disabilities or health deficits. Recently, multidimensional approaches to measuring frailty have included cognition, mood and social components...
November 21, 2016: BMC Geriatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27870697/functional-movement-screen-factorial-validity-and-measurement-invariance-across-sex-among-collegiate-student-athletes
#5
Stacy L Gnacinski, David J Cornell, Barbara B Meyer, Monna Arvinen-Barrow, Jennifer E Earl-Boehm
Gnacinski, SL, Cornell, DJ, Meyer, BB, Arvinen-Barrow, M, and Earl-Boehm, JE. Functional Movement Screen factorial validity and measurement invariance across sex among collegiate student-athletes. J Strength Cond Res 30(12): 3388-3395, 2016-The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) is a screening tool used to evaluate functional movement quality and subsequent musculoskeletal injury risk. Despite recent research on the factorial validity of the FMS, no confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) has been conducted to examine measurement invariance across sex among student-athletes...
December 2016: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27831746/the-interrelationship-of-common-clinical-movement-screens-establishing-population-specific-norms-in-a-large-cohort-of-military-applicants
#6
Sarah J de la Motte, Timothy C Gribbin, Peter Lisman, Anthony I Beutler, Patricia Deuster
CONTEXT:  Musculoskeletal injuries (MSK-Is) are a leading cause of missed duty time and morbidity in the military. Modifiable risk factors for MSK-Is, such as inadequate core stability, poor movement patterns, and dynamic balance deficits, have not been identified in military applicants on entering service. OBJECTIVE:  To establish normative functional movement data using a series of screens in military applicants entering basic training and explore relationships among several movement tests...
November 10, 2016: Journal of Athletic Training
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27827517/using-robot-fully-assisted-functional-movements-in-upper-limb-rehabilitation-of-chronic-stroke-patients-preliminary-results
#7
Marco Caimmi, Andrea Chiavenna, Alessandro Scano, Giulio Gasperini, Chiara Giovanzana, Lorenzo Molinari Tosatti, Franco Molteni
BACKGROUND: Robotic rehabilitation is promising to promote function in stroke patients. The assist as needed training paradigm has shown to stimulate neuroplasticity but often cannot be used because stroke patients are too impaired to actively control the robot against gravity. AIM: To verify whether a rehabilitation intervention based on robot fully assisted Reaching against gravity (RCH) and Hand-to-Mouth (HTM) can promote upper-limb function in chronic stroke...
November 9, 2016: European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27798135/physiological-and-perceptual-sensory-attenuation-have-different-underlying-neurophysiological-correlates
#8
Clare E Palmer, Marco Davare, James M Kilner
: Sensory attenuation, the top-down filtering or gating of afferent information, has been extensively studied in two fields: physiological and perceptual. Physiological sensory attenuation is represented as a decrease in the amplitude of the primary and secondary components of the somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) before and during movement. Perceptual sensory attenuation, described using the analogy of a persons' inability to tickle oneself, is a reduction in the perception of the afferent input of a self-produced tactile sensation due to the central cancellation of the reafferent signal by the efference copy of the motor command to produce the action...
October 19, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27777987/clinical-neurophysiological-evaluation-for-simple-motor-tics
#9
Pattamon Panyakaew, Hyun Joo Cho, Mark Hallett
Simple motor tics are sudden, nonrhythmic jerk like movements that are often preceded by premonitory urge and can be voluntarily suppressed. Some clinical characteristic of tics such as variability of movement, distractibility and fluctuating course can mimic functional movement disorders. Here we report a case of motor tics where the physiological approach in addition to careful clinical assessments is helpful to support the diagnosis of tic.
2016: Clinical Neurophysiology Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27753149/functional-dystonia-and-the-borderland-between-neurology-and-psychiatry-new-concepts
#10
Rachel Newby, Jane Alty, Peter Kempster
Mind-brain dualism has dominated historical commentary on dystonia, a dichotomous approach that has left our conceptual grasp of it stubbornly incomplete. This is particularly true of functional dystonia, most diagnostically challenging of all functional movement disorders, in which the question of inherent psychogenicity remains a focus of debate. Phenomenological signs considered in isolation lack the specificity to distinguish organic and nonorganic forms, and dystonia's variability has frustrated attempts to develop objective laboratory-supported standards...
October 18, 2016: Movement Disorders: Official Journal of the Movement Disorder Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27744440/cognitive-behavioural-therapy-and-adjunctive-physical-activity-for-functional-movement-disorders-conversion-disorder-a-pilot-single-blinded-randomized-study
#11
Carlo Dallocchio, Michele Tinazzi, Frederica Bombieri, Natale Arnó, Roberto Erro
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2016: Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27724897/paraspinal-muscles-density-a-marker-for-degenerative-lumbar-spinal-stenosis
#12
Janan Abbas, Viviane Slon, Hila May, Nathan Peled, Israel Hershkovitz, Kamal Hamoud
BACKGROUND: The condition of paraspinal muscles is known to be associated with some variables such as age, gender, and low back pain. It is generally agreed that these muscles play an important role in the stability and functional movements of the lumbar vertebral column. Although spinal instability has been shown to play an essential role in degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS), the role of paraspinal muscles remains elusive. The main purpose of this study was to shed light on the relationship between the condition of paraspinal muscles and symptomatic DLSS...
October 10, 2016: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27719867/posttraumatic-functional-movement-disorders
#13
C Ganos, M J Edwards, K P Bhatia
Traumatic injury to the nervous system may account for a range of neurologic symptoms. Trauma location and severity are important determinants of the resulting symptoms. In severe head injury with structural brain abnormalities, the occurrence of trauma-induced movement disorders, most commonly hyperkinesias such as tremor and dystonia, is well recognized and its diagnosis straightforward. However, the association of minor traumatic events, which do not lead to significant persistent structural brain damage, with the onset of movement disorders is more contentious...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27719855/functional-facial-and-tongue-movement-disorders
#14
A Fasano, M Tinazzi
Functional movement disorders (FMDs) affecting the eyelids, tongue, and other facial muscles are often underrecognized because their phenomenology has not been fully characterized. Nevertheless, these disorders are more common than previously thought. In this chapter we will discuss the phenomenology as well as the clinical and instrumental diagnosis of facial FMDs. Facial FMDs should be considered when a patient exhibits any combination of the following features: (1) fixed unilateral facial contractions, especially with lower lip, with or without ipsilateral jaw involvement, of maximal severity at onset; (2) inconsistent features such as changes in side and pattern during or between examination; (3) associated somatoform or nonphysiologic sensory or motor findings; (4) reduction or abolition of facial spasm with distraction; (5) response to suggestion or psychotherapy; (6) rapid onset and/or spontaneous remissions; and (7) normal neurologic examination...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27719854/functional-eye-movement-disorders
#15
D Kaski, A M Bronstein
Functional (psychogenic) eye movement disorders are perhaps less established in the medical literature than other types of functional movement disorders. Patients may present with ocular symptoms (e.g., blurred vision or oscillopsia) or functional eye movements may be identified during the formal examination of the eyes in patients with other functional disorders. Convergence spasm is the most common functional eye movement disorder, but functional gaze limitation, functional eye oscillations (also termed "voluntary nystagmus"), and functional convergence paralysis may be underreported...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27719847/functional-sensory-symptoms
#16
J Stone, M Vermeulen
Functional (psychogenic) sensory symptoms are those in which the patient genuinely experiences alteration or absence of normal sensation in the absence of neurologic disease. The hallmark of functional sensory symptoms is the presence of internal inconsistency revealing a pattern of symptoms governed by abnormally focused attention. In this chapter we review the history of this area, different clinical presentations, diagnosis (including sensitivity of diagnostic tests), treatment, experimental studies, and prognosis...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27719843/functional-jerks-tics-and-paroxysmal-movement-disorders
#17
Y E M Dreissen, D C Cath, M A J Tijssen
Functional jerks are among the most common functional movement disorders. The diagnosis of functional jerks is mainly based on neurologic examination revealing specific positive clinical signs. Differentiation from other jerky movements, such as tics, organic myoclonus, and primary paroxysmal dyskinesias, can be difficult. In support of a functional jerk are: acute onset in adulthood, precipitation by a physical event, variable, complex, and inconsistent phenomenology, suggestibility, distractibility, entrainment and a Bereitschaftspotential preceding the movement...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27719841/functional-tremor
#18
P Schwingenschuh, G Deuschl
Functional tremor is the commonest reported functional movement disorder. A confident clinical diagnosis of functional tremor is often possible based on the following "positive" criteria: a sudden tremor onset, unusual disease course, often with fluctuations or remissions, distractibility of the tremor if attention is removed from the affected body part, tremor entrainment, tremor variability, and a coactivation sign. Many patients show excessive exhaustion during examination. Other somatizations may be revealed in the medical history and patients may show additional functional neurologic symptoms and signs...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27719839/neurologic-diagnostic-criteria-for-functional-neurologic-disorders
#19
C Gasca-Salas, A E Lang
The diagnosis of functional neurologic disorders can be challenging. In this chapter we review the diagnostic criteria and rating scales reported for functional/psychogenic sensorimotor disturbances, psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) and functional movement disorders (FMD). A recently published scale for sensorimotor signs has some limitations, but may help in the diagnosis, and four motor and two sensory signs have been reported as highly reliable. There is good evidence using eight specific signs for the differentiation of PNES from seizures...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27719833/voluntary-or-involuntary-a-neurophysiologic-approach-to-functional-movement-disorders
#20
M-P Stenner, P Haggard
Patients with functional movement disorders (FMD) experience movements as involuntary that share fundamental characteristics with voluntary actions. This apparent paradox raises questions regarding the possible sources of a subjective experience of action. In addition, it poses a yet unresolved diagnostic challenge, namely how to describe or even quantify this experience in a scientifically and clinically useful way. Here, we describe recent experimental approaches that have shed light on the phenomenology of action in FMD...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
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