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Dopamine amantadine

Nicki Niemann, Joseph Jankovic
Tardive dyskinesia (TD) encompasses the spectrum of iatrogenic hyperkinetic movement disorders following exposure to dopamine receptor-blocking agents (DRBAs). Despite the advent of atypical or second- and third-generation antipsychotics with a presumably lower risk of complications, TD remains a persistent and challenging problem. Prevention is the first step in mitigating the risk of TD, but early recognition, gradual withdrawal of offending medications, and appropriate treatment are also critical. As TD is often a persistent and troublesome disorder, specific antidyskinetic therapies are often needed for symptomatic relief...
February 26, 2018: Drugs
Roongroj Bhidayasiri, Onanong Jitkritsadakul, Joseph H Friedman, Stanley Fahn
BACKGROUND: Management of tardive syndromes (TS) is challenging, with only a few evidence-based therapeutic algorithms reported in the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) guideline in 2013. OBJECTIVE: To update the evidence-based recommendations and provide a practical treatment algorithm for management of TS by addressing 5 questions: 1) Is withdrawal of dopamine receptor blocking agents (DRBAs) an effective TS treatment? 2) Does switching from typical to atypical DRBAs reduce TS symptoms? 3) What is the efficacy of pharmacologic agents in treating TS? 4) Do patients with TS benefit from chemodenervation with botulinum toxin? 5) Do patients with TS benefit from surgical therapy? METHODS: Systematic reviews were conducted by searching PsycINFO, Ovid MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science and Cochrane for articles published between 2012 and 2017 to identify new evidence published after the 2013 AAN guidelines...
February 5, 2018: Journal of the Neurological Sciences
Pratibha Surathi, Nitish Kamble, Ketaki Swapnil Bhalsing, Ravi Yadav, Pramod Kumar Pal
BACKGROUND: Several factors determine the choice of medications in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We aimed to analyze the pattern of prescription of drugs in patients with PD before attending a tertiary-care center. METHODS: The study included chart review of 800 PD patients attending the Department of Neurology of the National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences in Bangalore, India. RESULTS: The mean age at onset was 51...
November 2017: Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences. le Journal Canadien des Sciences Neurologiques
Hany G El-Sayeh, John Rathbone, Karla Soares-Weiser, Hanna Bergman
BACKGROUND: Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a disabling movement disorder associated with the prolonged use of antipsychotic medication. Several strategies have been examined in the treatment of TD. Currently, however, there is no clear evidence of the effectiveness of these drugs in TD and they have been associated with many side effects. One particular strategy would be to use pharmaceutical agents which are known to influence the catecholaminergic system at various junctures. OBJECTIVES: 1...
January 18, 2018: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Daniel Weintraub, Daniel O Claassen
Impulse control disorders (ICDs), such as compulsive gambling, buying, sexual, and eating behaviors, are a serious and increasingly recognized complication in Parkinson's disease (PD), occurring in up to 20% of PD patients over the course of their illness. Related behaviors include punding (stereotyped, repetitive, purposeless behaviors), dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS) (compulsive medication overuse), and hobbyism (e.g., compulsive internet use, artistic endeavors, and writing). These disorders have a significant impact on quality of life and function, strain interpersonal relationships, and worsen caregiver burden, and are associated with significant psychiatric comorbidity...
2017: International Review of Neurobiology
Juan-Juan Du, Sheng-Di Chen
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to summarize recent studies on nondopaminergic options for the treatment of motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). DATA SOURCES: Papers in English published in PubMed, Cochrane, and Ovid Nursing databases between January 1988 and November 2016 were searched using the following keywords: PD, nondopaminergic therapy, adenosine, glutamatergic, adrenergic, serotoninergic, histaminic, and iron chelator. We also reviewed the ongoing clinical trials in the website of clinicaltrials...
August 5, 2017: Chinese Medical Journal
Stanley N Caroff, E Cabrina Campbell, Benjamin Carroll
Tardive dyskinesia (TD) occurs in patients receiving antipsychotic treatment with dopamine receptor antagonists. Despite the prevalence of TD and its negative impact on patients' lives, there has been a lack of approved treatments and limited evidence from controlled trials of pharmacological treatment. Areas covered: PubMed was searched for English-language papers published during 2007-2016 using terms 'tardive dyskinesia' or 'drug-induced movement disorder', and 'treatment'. Studies evaluating pharmacological agents for the treatment of TD were selected...
September 2017: Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics
Franz Marxreiter, Jürgen Winkler, Martin Uhl, Dominik Madžar
Amantadine is frequently used in addition to dopaminergic substances like dopamine agonists or L-Dopa in advanced Parkinson disease (PD). However, adverse effects like hallucinations limit its use. PD patients developing severe psychotic symptoms upon treatment with either dopaminergic substances and/or amantadine need to stop intake of any psychotropic substance. Here, we report the case of a 71-year-old PD patient without previously known cognitive impairment. He presented with drug-induced psychotic symptoms due to changes in his therapeutic regimen (increase in COMT inhibitors, newly introduced MAO B inhibitors)...
January 2017: Case Reports in Neurology
Leah D Fryml, Kristen R Williams, Christopher G Pelic, James Fox, Gregory Sahlem, Sophie Robert, Gonzalo J Revuelta, Edward Baron Short
Amantadine, which was originally developed as an antiviral medication, functions as a dopamine agonist in the central nervous system and consequently is utilized in the treatment of Parkinson disease, drug-induced extrapyramidal reactions, and neuroleptic malignant syndrome. For reasons that are not entirely understood, abrupt changes in amantadine dosage can produce a severe withdrawal syndrome. Existing medical literature describes case reports of amantadine withdrawal leading to delirium, which at times has progressed to neuroleptic malignant syndrome...
May 2017: Journal of Psychiatric Practice
J R Bedarf, F Hildebrand, L P Coelho, S Sunagawa, M Bahram, F Goeser, P Bork, U Wüllner
BACKGROUND: Parkinson's disease (PD) presently is conceptualized as a protein aggregation disease in which pathology involves both the enteric and the central nervous system, possibly spreading from one to another via the vagus nerves. As gastrointestinal dysfunction often precedes or parallels motor symptoms, the enteric system with its vast diversity of microorganisms may be involved in PD pathogenesis. Alterations in the enteric microbial taxonomic level of L-DOPA-naïve PD patients might also serve as a biomarker...
April 28, 2017: Genome Medicine
Thiago Cardoso Vale, Flávia Cristina de Lima Pinto, José Luiz Pedroso, Marília Alves Dos Reis, Ilza Rosa Batista, Rodrigo Affonseca Bressan, René Leandro Magalhães Rivero, Renato Adam Mendonça, Orlando G Barsottini
History A 43-year-old right-handed man presented with a history of progressive mild left-sided weakness and slowness of movements. Symptoms began 4 years earlier, and the patient noticed a progressive decline in his daily routine due to gait difficulties in the past year. There was no history of head trauma, surgery, drug therapy, smoking, or alcohol abuse, nor was there any relevant family history. Examination revealed normal cognition (29 of 30 points on the Mini-Mental State Examination and 27 of 30 points on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment) and normal cerebellar, sensory, cranial nerve, and autonomic function...
May 2017: Radiology
Marc Morissette, Thérèse Di Paolo
Non-human primate (NHP) models of Parkinson disease show many similarities with the human disease. They are very useful to test novel pharmacotherapies as reviewed here. The various NHP models of this disease are described with their characteristics including the macaque, the marmoset, and the squirrel monkey models. Lesion-induced and genetic models are described. There is no drug to slow, delay, stop, or cure Parkinson disease; available treatments are symptomatic. The dopamine precursor, L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-Dopa) still remains the gold standard symptomatic treatment of Parkinson...
April 8, 2017: Journal of Neural Transmission
Mia Levite, Franca Marino, Marco Cosentino
Dopamine is a key neurotransmitter that induces critical effects in the nervous system and in many peripheral organs, via 5 dopamine receptors (DRs): D1R-D5R. Dopamine also induces many direct and very potent effects on many DR-expressing immune cells, primarily T cells and dendritic cells. In this review, we focus only on dopamine receptors, effects and production in T cells. Dopamine by itself (at an optimal concentration of~0.1 nM) induces multiple function of resting normal human T cells, among them: T cell adhesion, chemotactic migration, homing, cytokine secretion and others...
May 2017: Journal of Neural Transmission
Ramón Cacabelos
Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most important age-related neurodegenerative disorder in developed societies, after Alzheimer's disease, with a prevalence ranging from 41 per 100,000 in the fourth decade of life to over 1900 per 100,000 in people over 80 years of age. As a movement disorder, the PD phenotype is characterized by rigidity, resting tremor, and bradykinesia. Parkinson's disease -related neurodegeneration is likely to occur several decades before the onset of the motor symptoms. Potential risk factors include environmental toxins, drugs, pesticides, brain microtrauma, focal cerebrovascular damage, and genomic defects...
March 4, 2017: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Samantha Sterkel, Akinboyede Akinyemi, Marcos A Sanchez-Gonzalez, George Michel
BACKGROUND: Pyrexia is a physiological response through which the immune system responds to infectious processes. Hyperpyrexia is known to be neurodegenerative leading to brain damage. Some of the neurotoxic effects of hyperpyrexia on the brain include seizures, decreased cognitive speed, mental status changes, coma, and even death. In the clinical management of hyperpyrexia, the goal is to treat the underlying cause of elevated temperature and prevent end organ damage. CASE PRESENTATION: This case illustrates a 39-year-old white American man referred from another medical facility where he had undergone an upper gastrointestinal tract diagnostic procedure which became complicated by blood aspiration and respiratory distress...
February 13, 2017: Journal of Medical Case Reports
Jonathan M Meyer
The broad use of atypical antipsychotics was expected to dramatically reduce the prevalence and incidence of tardive dyskinesia (TD), but data show that TD remains an important challenge due the persistent nature of its symptoms and resistance to numerous treatment modalities, including antipsychotic discontinuation. Recent insights on genetic risk factors and new concepts surrounding pathophysiology have spurred interest in the possibility of targeted treatment for TD. As will be reviewed in this article, the number of evidence-based strategies for TD treatment is small: only clonazepam, amantadine, ginkgo biloba extract, and the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) inhibitor tetrabenazine have compelling data...
December 2016: CNS Spectrums
Sabine Janssen, Bastiaan R Bloem, Bart P van de Warrenburg
A wide variety of drugs can cause myoclonus. To illustrate this, we first discuss two personally observed cases, one presenting with generalized, but facial-predominant, myoclonus that was induced by amantadine; and the other presenting with propriospinal myoclonus triggered by an antibiotic. We then review the literature on drugs that may cause myoclonus, extracting the corresponding clinical phenotype and suggested underlying pathophysiology. The most frequently reported classes of drugs causing myoclonus include opiates, antidepressants, antipsychotics, and antibiotics...
August 2017: Journal of Neurology
Alfonso Fasano, Silke Appel-Cresswell, Mandar Jog, Mateusz Zurowkski, Sarah Duff-Canning, Melanie Cohn, Marina Picillo, Christopher R Honey, Michel Panisset, Renato Puppi Munhoz
In this review, we have gathered all the available evidence to guide medication management after deep brain stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's disease (PD). Surprisingly, we found that almost no study addressed drug-based management in the postoperative period. Dopaminergic medications are usually reduced, but whether the levodopa or dopamine agonist is to be reduced is left to the personal preference of the treating physician. We have summarized the pros and cons of both approaches. No study on the management of cognitive problems after DBS has been done, and only a few studies have explored the pharmacological management of such DBS-resistant symptoms as voice (amantadine), balance (donepezil) or gait disorders (amantadine, methylphenidate)...
September 2016: Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences. le Journal Canadien des Sciences Neurologiques
Irene Sebastianutto, Natallia Maslava, Corey R Hopkins, M Angela Cenci
Rodent models of l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) are essential to investigate pathophysiological mechanisms and treatment options. Ratings of abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) are used to capture both qualitative and quantitative features of dyskinetic behaviors. Thus far, validated rating scales for the mouse have anchored the definition of severity to the time during which AIMs are present. Here we have asked whether the severity of axial, limb, and orolingual AIMs can be objectively assessed with scores based on movement amplitude...
September 2, 2016: Neurobiology of Disease
Wolfgang Oertel, Jörg B Schulz
Over a period of more than 50 years, the symptomatic treatment of the motor symptoms of Parkinson disease (PD) has been optimized using pharmacotherapy, deep brain stimulation, and physiotherapy. The arsenal of pharmacotherapies includes L-Dopa, several dopamine agonists, inhibitors of monoamine oxidase (MAO)-B and catechol-o-methyltransferase (COMT), and amantadine. In the later course of the disease, motor complications occur, at which stage different oral formulations of L-Dopa or dopamine agonists with long half-life, a transdermal application or parenteral pumps for continuous drug supply can be subscribed...
October 2016: Journal of Neurochemistry
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