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Bleeding reversal

Camille Clare, Mary-Beatrice Squire, Karem Alvarez, Julia Meisler, Candice Fraser
OBJECTIVE: The United States has the highest rate of adolescent pregnancy of the industrialized nations. Previously reported patient barriers to the use of contraception included an ambivalence about pregnancy; method side effects; difficulty using methods; lack of satisfaction with methods; concerns about safety; expense; and a lack of knowledge about long-acting reversible contraception (LARC). This survey aims to determine if there are additional barriers to contraception use and adherence among an ethnically diverse urban population...
October 15, 2016: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health
Jenny A Higgins, Jessica N Sanders, Mari Palta, David K Turok
OBJECTIVE: To document how long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) affects women's sexual outcomes. METHODS: In this prospective, observational cohort study, we enrolled new-start intrauterine device and contraceptive implant users attending four family planning clinics. Data collection occurred at baseline, 1 month, and 3 months. Primary outcomes were the Female Sexual Function Index, New Sexual Satisfaction Scale, and perceived sexual effects of method (positive, negative, or none)...
October 6, 2016: Obstetrics and Gynecology
Jacques Donnez, Olivier Donnez, Marie-Madeleine Dolmans
During the last decade, there has been increased emphasis on the role of progesterone in the promotion of fibroid growth, as well as heightened interest in modulating progesterone pathways by use of selective progesterone receptor modulators (SPRMs). Among them, ulipristal acetate (UPA) has proved its efficacy in the management of symptomatic myomas by controlling bleeding and inducing amenorrhea, and reducing the size of myomas in the majority of cases. Areas covered: In this review, we summarize published scientific studies exploring evidence of the safety of SPRMs and particularly UPA, a drug approved for the management of symptomatic uterine fibroids...
October 14, 2016: Expert Opinion on Drug Safety
Charles L Francoeur, Stephan A Mayer
For patients who survive the initial bleeding event of a ruptured brain aneurysm, delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is one of the most important causes of mortality and poor neurological outcome. New insights in the last decade have led to an important paradigm shift in the understanding of DCI pathogenesis. Large-vessel cerebral vasospasm has been challenged as the sole causal mechanism; new hypotheses now focus on the early brain injury, microcirculatory dysfunction, impaired autoregulation, and spreading depolarization...
October 14, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Nasim Shahidi Hamedani, Heiko Rühl, Julia Janina Zimmermann, Tim Heiseler, Johannes Oldenburg, Günter Mayer, Bernd Pötzsch, Jens Müller
Activated protein C (APC) is a critical regulator of thrombin formation and thereby protects against thrombosis. On the other hand, overwhelming formation of APC increases the risk of bleeding such as in trauma-induced coagulopathy. Thus, pharmacological inhibition of APC activity may improve blood clottability in certain clinical situations. In this study, we demonstrate that the DNA aptamer HS02-52G binds with fast onset (1.118 ± 0.013 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1)) to APC and possesses a long residence time of 13...
October 13, 2016: Nucleic Acid Therapeutics
Hervé Quintard, Delphine Viard, Milou-Daniel Drici, Caroline Ruetsch, Charles Marc Samama, Carole Ichai
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 13, 2016: Thrombosis and Haemostasis
Luke Miller, Jason A Ferreira, Calvin Tucker
BACKGROUND: The development of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) has revolutionized oral anticoagulation. Rapid incorporation of NOACs into general practice has heightened the demand for directed reversal agents. Idarucizumab is a targeted reversal agent that is approved for the urgent reversal of the anticoagulant effects of dabigatran. While it is a welcome addition to reversal strategies of dabigatran, a number of clinical questions exist regarding its place in therapy. OBJECTIVE: We describe controversies regarding the use of idarucizumab therapy in patients with dabigatran-associated bleeding...
October 8, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Mamatha Bhat, Bianca M Arendt, Venkat Bhat, Eberhard L Renner, Atul Humar, Johane P Allard
The intestinal microbiome (IM) is altered in patients with cirrhosis, and emerging literature suggests that this impacts on the development of complications. The PubMed database was searched from January 2000 to May 2015 for studies and review articles on the composition, pathophysiologic effects and therapeutic modulation of the IM in cirrhosis. The following combination of relevant text words and MeSH terms were used, namely intestinal microbiome, microbiota, or dysbiosis, and cirrhosis, encephalopathy, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, hepatorenal syndrome, variceal bleeding, hepatopulmonary syndrome, portopulmonary hypertension and hepatocellular carcinoma...
September 28, 2016: World Journal of Hepatology
Fatima Urooj, Abhishek Kulkarni, Dwight Stapleton, Edo Kaluski
The choice of an oral anticoagulant (OAC) for patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) is a major and complex clinical decision taking into account the individual risk-benefit ratio and bearing in mind the chronicity of therapy. This review focuses on the safety and efficacy of new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) compared with conventional vitamin K antagonists (VKA) in patients with NVAF. Current data suggest that NOACs are at least as effective and safe as VKAs for most NVAF subjects. The NOACs do not mandate dietary restrictions and regular pharmacodynamic monitoring, and they seem to have lesser incidence of intracranial or fatal bleeding when compared with VKAs...
October 7, 2016: Clinical Cardiology
N Appleby, E Groarke, M Crowley, F A Wahab, A M McCann, L Egan, D Gough, G McMahon, D O'Donghaile, D O'Keeffe, N O'Connell
BACKGROUND: Real-world studies of the emergency reversal of warfarin using 4-factor prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) report unwarranted delays. The delay to receiving PCC was ≥ 8 h in 46·7% of patients with warfarin-associated bleeding (PWAB) treated with a variable PCC dosing protocol in our retrospective audit. OBJECTIVE: To report the impact of a simplified PCC dosing protocol on the interval to reversal of anticoagulation. METHODS: We developed a PCC dosing protocol standardising the initial PCC dose and simplifying dosing calculations...
October 7, 2016: Transfusion Medicine
Paul A Reilly, Joanne van Ryn, Oliver Grottke, Stephan Glund, Joachim Stangier
The direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) provide a number of clinical advantages over vitamin K antagonists for the treatment of thromboembolism, including improved efficacy and safety, as well as no need for regular monitoring of anticoagulant effect. However, as with all anticoagulants, bleeding complications may occur, and anticoagulant reversal may be required in specific clinical situations, such as in patients experiencing spontaneous or traumatic bleeds, or in anticoagulated patients requiring emergency surgery or other invasive procedures...
September 28, 2016: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
Truman J Milling, Scott Kaatz
Oral Factor Xa (FXa) inhibitors, a growing class of direct-acting anticoagulants, are frequently used to prevent stroke and systemic embolism in patients with atrial fibrillation and to prevent and treat venous thromboembolism. These drugs reduce the risk of clotting at the expense of increasing the risk of bleeding, and currently they have no specific reversal agent. However, andexanet alfa, a recombinant modified FXa decoy molecule, is in a late-phase clinical trial in bleeding patients, and ciraparantag, a small molecule that appears to reverse many anticoagulants including the FXa inhibitors, is in development...
September 28, 2016: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
Jerrold H Levy
Patients taking direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) who then need an emergency invasive procedure require specialized management strategies. Appropriate patient evaluation includes assessment of the current anticoagulation state, including timing of the last dose. DOACs require particular coagulation assays to measure anticoagulation levels accurately, although standard coagulation screening tests may provide qualitative guidance. Specialty societies have endorsed general recommendations for patient management to promote hemostasis in anticoagulated patients requiring surgery or other invasive procedures...
September 29, 2016: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
John Eikelboom, Geno Merli
The risk of bleeding in the setting of anticoagulant therapy continues to be re-evaluated following the introduction of a new generation of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs). Interruption of DOAC therapy and supportive care may be sufficient for the management of patients who present with mild or moderate bleeding, but in those with life-threatening bleeding, a specific reversal agent is desirable. We review the phase 3 clinical studies of dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, in the context of bleeding risk and management...
September 29, 2016: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
Menno V Huisman, John Fanikos
As expected with all antithrombotic agents, there is a risk of bleeding complications in patients receiving direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) because of the DOAC itself, acute trauma, invasive procedures, or underlying comorbidities. For many bleeding events, a prudent course of action will be to withdraw the DOAC, then "wait and support" the patient, with the expectation that the bleeding event should resolve with time. Likewise, DOAC therapy may be interrupted ahead of a planned procedure, the stopping time being dependent on the agent involved and the patient's renal function...
September 28, 2016: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
Charles V Pollack
Idarucizumab is a monoclonal antibody fragment specifically targeted to dabigatran. It has demonstrated prompt and durable reversal of the anticoagulant effects of dabigatran in animal studies and phase 1 studies of young, elderly, and renally impaired volunteers. Although elective invasive procedures and most bleeding complications in dabigatran-treated patients can be managed by temporarily stopping dabigatran therapy and using supportive measures, there are rare clinical situations that require urgent reversal of the anticoagulant effect of dabigatran...
September 28, 2016: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
Frederik Uttenthal Larsen, Anne-Mette Hvas, Erik Lerkevang Grove
Non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are alternatives to vitamin K antagonists and provide consistent anticoagulation with equal or better clinical outcome and no need for routine monitoring. Bleeding is a feared complication of anticoagulants. Until recently, no specific agent has been available for reversal of NOACs. Idarucizumab binds dabigatran for rapid reversal of its activity without procoagulant effects. Andexanet alpha (expected release in 2016) and PER977 are antidotes under clinical development...
October 3, 2016: Ugeskrift for Laeger
Andrea Morotti, Joshua N Goldstein
Direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) are an attractive therapeutic option for anticoagulant treatment in the setting of venous thromboembolism or non-valvular atrial fibrillation. These drugs overall appear to have a lower risk of life-threatening hemorrhage than the vitamin K antagonists. In addition, they demonstrate more predictable and stable pharmacokinetics. Measurement of the degree of anticoagulation is desirable in patients with DOAC-associated hemorrhage, but commonly available coagulation assays show poor sensitivity for degree of DOAC effect...
November 2016: Current Treatment Options in Neurology
Benilde Cosmi
Anticoagulants such as heparins and vitamin K antagonists (VKA) are effective for thrombosis prevention and treatment, but are associated with the risk of bleeding and other limitations, spurring the search for improved drugs. Areas covered: to evaluate the newer anticoagulants, focusing on those tested in phase III clinical trials such as direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs), antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) and warfarin analogues. DOACs such as dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban are licensed for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and treatment of venous thromboembolism, dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban for postoperative thromboprophylaxis in patients undergoing elective hip or knee arthroplasty and rivaroxaban for secondary prevention of acute coronary syndromes...
October 12, 2016: Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy
G E Salvi, R Cosgarea, A Sculean
The aim of the present critical review is to summarize recent evidence on the prevalence of peri-implant diseases and their similarities and differences with periodontal diseases with a focus on their pathogenetic mechanisms. Reports on the extent and severity of peri-implant diseases are influenced by different case definitions. The prevalence of peri-implant diseases is reported at the subject or implant level and affected by the type of population samples analyzed (e.g., randomly selected population samples or convenience samples)...
September 28, 2016: Journal of Dental Research
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