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spinal hyperostosis

Kentaro Yamada, Shigenobu Satoh, Yuichiro Abe, Yasushi Yanagibashi, Takahiko Hyakumachi, Takeshi Masuda
STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective longitudinal cohort study. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) and reoperation in patients treated surgically for lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) in long-term results. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Few studies have evaluated DISH as a potential risk factor of poor surgical results for LSS. METHODS: This study included 1063 responders to a postoperative postal survey out of 2363 consecutive patients who underwent surgery for LSS between 2002 and 2010...
February 23, 2018: Spine
Kazuaki Morizane, Shunsuke Fujibayashi, Bungo Otsuki, Takeshi Sakamoto, Ryosuke Tsutsumi, Seiichi Odate, Akira Kusuba, Shuichi Matsuda
BACKGROUND: Although a valve-like mechanism has been proposed for expansion of spinal extradural arachnoid cysts (SEACs), the detailed mechanism remains unclear. Moreover, closure of the communication site is essential during surgery, but the method to identify the communication site remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the detailed mechanism of expanding SEACs through retrospective analysis of SEAC cases undergoing surgery and to elucidate the characteristics of the communication sites...
February 13, 2018: Journal of Orthopaedic Science: Official Journal of the Japanese Orthopaedic Association
Takahiro Ushijima, Kenichi Kawaguchi, Tadashi Matsumoto, Masaki Takagi, Tatsuro Kondoh, Gen Nishimura, Aritoshi Iida, Shiro Ikegawa, Nobuhiko Haga, Go Kato
BACKGROUND: Patients with ankylosing spines are susceptible to developing spinal fractures even with minor trauma and can develop early or late neurological injuries. These fractures require early and aggressive surgical management to enable spinal stability and/or neural decompression. Being highly unstable by nature, they require relatively long segment instrumentation and fusion, which can increase paravertebral soft tissue damage and perioperative bleeding. The purpose of this report is to describe a rare case of traumatic double fractures at the cervico-thoracic and thoraco-lumbar transition zones in ankylosing spine with spondylo-epiphyseal dysplasia (SED) of unknown cause, which were successfully treated with a combined open and percutaneous spinal fusion procedure...
February 7, 2018: BMC Research Notes
Numan Karaarslan, Mehmet Sabri Gürbüz, Tezcan Çalışkan, Abdullah Talha Simsek
Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) (Forestier syndrome) is a rheumatologic disease, the etiology of which is not exactly known. It is characterized by spinal osteophyte formations resulting from the ossification of the paravertebral ligaments and muscles. Anterior longitudinal ligament is the usual site of involvement and the frequency of the disease increases after the 5th decade. Lower cervical segments are the most frequently involved regions whereas the upper cervical involvement leading to dysphagia is very rare...
December 2017: Journal of Spine Surgery (Hong Kong)
Kentaro Yamada, Shigenobu Satoh, Hiroshi Hashizume, Noriko Yoshimura, Ryohei Kagotani, Yuyu Ishimoto, Yuichiro Abe, Hiromitsu Toyoda, Hidetomi Terai, Takeshi Masuda, Shigeyuki Muraki, Hiroaki Nakamura, Munehito Yoshida
Factors related to the onset and progression of lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) have not yet been identified. Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) increases mechanical loading on the non-fused lumbar levels and may therefore lead to LSS. This cross-sectional study aimed to identify associations between LSS and DISH. This study included 2363 consecutive patients undergoing surgery for LSS and 787 general inhabitants without symptoms of LSS as participants of the population-based cohort study, Research on Osteoarthritis/Osteoporosis Against Disability...
January 11, 2018: Journal of Bone and Mineral Metabolism
Michael Pitta, Corey J Wallach, Colleen Bauk, William G Hamilton
This report describes a patient with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) who underwent total hip arthroplasty (THA) by the direct anterior approach and sustained a L4-5 extension fracture dislocation with neural deficits. A magnetic resonance imaging revealed an epidural hematoma at the site of the fracture causing critical stenosis. The patient was taken to the operating room for a L3-S1 posterior decompression with L2-pelvis posterior spinal fusion. AS and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis create a stiff spine that predisposes to fractures because of the larger moment arms experienced than normal spines...
December 2017: Arthroplasty Today
John Begly, Vineet Tyagi, Eric Strauss
Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is common spinal condition characterized by increased calcification and ossification of ligaments and entheses, typically in the anterior aspect of the spine. However, extraspinal manifestations of the disease can occur and depending on the degree and location of involvement, may become symptomatic. We present the case of a 63-year-old male with a history of DISH, who failed initial open distal clavicle excision due to the postoperative development of heterotopic bone bridging across the acromioclavicular joint...
December 2017: Bulletin of the Hospital for Joint Diseases
Rachid Redjati, Richard Damade, Valerie Royant
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 3, 2017: Joint, Bone, Spine: Revue du Rhumatisme
Frederik R Teunissen, Bianca M Verbeek, Thomas D Cha, Joseph H Schwab
OBJECTIVE Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a major complication of spinal fractures in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH). Due to the uncommon nature of these conditions, existing literature consists of relatively small case series without detailed neurological data. This study aims to investigate the incidence, predictors, and sequelae of SCI in patients with a traumatic fracture of the ankylosed spine. METHODS The study included all patients older than 18 years of age with AS or DISH who presented to two affiliated tertiary care centers between January 1, 1990, and January 1, 2016, and had a traumatic fracture of the spine...
December 2017: Journal of Neurosurgery. Spine
Ramanuj Sinha, Neeraj Aggarwal, Sirshak Dutta, Avijit Choudhury, Sanjoy-Kumar Ghosh, Debasis Guha
INTRODUCTION: Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis (DISH) is a very rare cause of dysphagia when it occurs in the cervical spine. It can also affect the lumbar region where it causes deformity. CASE REPORT: In this article, a rare case of Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis involving both the cervical and lumbar spine, presenting with dysphagia and spinal stiffness leading to a stooping posture, is reported. CONCLUSION: Cases of simultaneous involvement of cervical and lumbar vertebrae by Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis, presenting with symptoms of both area involvement, are rarely reported in the English literature...
July 2017: Iranian Journal of Otorhinolaryngology
Tarush Rustagi, Doniel Drazin, Cumhur Oner, Jonathan York, Gregory D Schroeder, Alexander R Vaccaro, Rod J Oskouian, Jens R Chapman
INTRODUCTION: Spinal ankylosing disorders encompass ankylosing spondylitis (AS), disseminated hyperostosis of the spine, and end-stage spondylosis. All these result in a stiffened and frequently deformed spinal column. This makes the spinal column highly susceptible to severe injuries that are commonly associated with unfavorable outcomes. Improved understanding of the underlying disease processes and clinical comorbidities may alter the poor injury related morbidity and mortality outcomes...
September 2017: Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma
Sebastian Hartmann, Anja Tschugg, Christoph Wipplinger, Claudius Thomé
STUDY DESIGN: Narrative literature review. OBJECTIVE: The numbers of low-energy cervical fractures seen in patients suffering from ankylosing spondylitis (also known as Bechterew disease) or diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (also known as Forestier disease) have greatly increased over recent decades. These fractures tend to be particularly overlooked, leading to delayed diagnosis and secondary neurological deterioration. The aim of the present evaluation was to summarize current knowledge on cervical fractures in patients with ankylosing spinal disorders (ASDs)...
August 2017: Global Spine Journal
Hiroshi Kobayashi, Koji Otani, Kazuyuki Watanabe, Kinshi Kato, Takuya Nikaido, Shoji Yabuki, Shin-Ichi Kikuchi, Shin-Ichi Konno
The patient was an 86-year-old woman with back pain after a fall. She had no neurological findings at the initial visit. Plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) and a Th10 fracture. Two weeks later, she started gait exercise with immobilization by a rigid orthosis. Twenty-five days later, she presented with paralysis and numbness of her legs. Computed tomography (CT) showed anterior expansion in the vertebral body of Th10. MRI showed an intramedullary high-intensity area on T2-weighted images at the same level...
August 9, 2017: Fukushima Journal of Medical Science
Xizhe Liu, Gentaro Kumagai, Kanichiro Wada, Toshihiro Tanaka, Toru Asari, Kazuki Oishi, Taku Fujita, Hiroki Mizukami, Ken-Ichi Furukawa, Yasuyuki Ishibashi
STUDY DESIGN: Basic experiments in a mouse model of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). OBJECTIVE: To assess the osteogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) obtained from muscle and adipose tissue in Tiptoe-walking (ttw) mice, in which cervical OPLL compresses the spinal cord and causes motor and sensory dysfunction. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: In humans, MSCs have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cervical OPLL...
December 1, 2017: Spine
Tochukwu C Ikpeze, Addisu Mesfin
Spinal cord injuries (SCIs) are sustained by more than 12 500 patients per year in the United States and more globally. The SCIs disproportionately affect the elderly, especially men. Approximately 60% of these injuries are sustained traumatically through falls, but nontraumatic causes including infections, tumors, and medication-related epidural bleeding have also been documented. Preexisting conditions such as ankylosing spondylitis and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis can render the spine stiff and are risk factors as well as cervical spondylosis and ensuing cervical stenosis...
June 2017: Geriatric Orthopaedic Surgery & Rehabilitation
Teresa Clavaguera, Patrícia Reyner, Ramón Valls, Eulàlia de Cendra, Mari Carmen Rodríguez-Jimeno
Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis is a bone disease characterized by ossification of spinal ligaments and peripheral entheses. Currently, we still use the classic classification criteria that do not include extraspinal manifestations. A number of authors agree on the need to revise them. We present 3 patients in which a diagnosis of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis could not be established if we apply those criteria, but they have fully compatible clinical and radiological manifestations of hyperostotic disease...
May 18, 2017: Reumatología Clinica
Tatsuya Yamamoto, Yoshiomi Kobayashi, Yoji Ogura, Yohei Takahashi, Yoshio Shinozaki, Jun Ogawa
Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is characterized by calcifications and ossification of ligaments and tendon insertions. The patients with DISH are susceptible to spinal column injury with trivial trauma due to immobilization of vertebrae and this easily leads to spinal cord injury. However, only few reports on hyperextension injuries of the thoracolumbar spine with DISH exist. Here we report three cases of those who developed delayed leg paraplegia after hyperextension injuries of the thoracolumbar spine with DISH...
March 2017: Journal of Surgical Case Reports
Jonneke S Kuperus, Erin E A de Gendt, F Cumhur Oner, Pim A de Jong, Stan C F M Buckens, Alie E van der Merwe, George J R Maat, Elizabeth A Regan, Donald L Resnick, Reuven Mader, Jorrit-Jan Verlaan
Objectives: DISH is a condition characterized by flowing ossifications of the spine with or without ossifications of entheses elsewhere in the body. Studies on the prevalence and pathogenesis of DISH use a variety of partly overlapping combinations of classification criteria, making meaningful comparisons across the literature difficult. The aim of this study was to systematically summarize the available criteria to support the development of a more uniform set of diagnostic/classification criteria...
July 1, 2017: Rheumatology
Uri Arad, Ori Elkayam, Iris Eshed
Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) is a non-inflammatory condition that involves calcification and ossification of the spinal ligaments and entheses. While, characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesions of the spine in patients with axial spondyloarthritis, another enthesitis-related disease, have been described and defined, there is a paucity of information regarding the MRI findings in DISH. The aim of this study was to describe the MRI findings of patients with DISH. We collected computed tomography studies with findings characteristic of DISH and that also had corresponding and concurrent MRI studies of the spine...
July 2017: Clinical Rheumatology
Yasutaka Takagi, Hiroshi Yamada, Hidehumi Ebara, Hiroyuki Hayashi, Takeshi Iwanaga, Kengo Shimozaki, Yoshiyuki Kitano, Kenji Kagechika, Hiroyuki Tsuchiya
BACKGROUND: Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis has long been regarded as a benign asymptomatic clinical entity with an innocuous clinical course. Neurological complications are rare in diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. However, if they do occur, the consequences are often significant enough to warrant major neurosurgical intervention. Neurological complications occur when the pathological process of ossification in diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis extends to other vertebral ligaments, causing ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligaments and/or ossification of the ligamentum flavum...
April 1, 2017: Journal of Medical Case Reports
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