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Implementation science

Madhukar Pai, Mark P Nicol, Catharina C Boehme
Rapid and accurate diagnosis is critical for timely initiation of anti-tuberculosis (TB) treatment, but many people with TB (or TB symptoms) do not have access to adequate initial diagnosis. In many countries, TB diagnosis is still reliant on sputum microscopy, a test with known limitations. However, new diagnostics are starting to change the landscape. Stimulated, in part, by the success and rollout of Xpert MTB/RIF, an automated, molecular test, there is now considerable interest in new technologies. The landscape looks promising with a pipeline of new tools, particularly molecular diagnostics, and well over 50 companies actively engaged in product development, and many tests have been reviewed by WHO for policy endorsement...
October 2016: Microbiology Spectrum
Sally Lindsay, Kara Grace Hounsell
PURPOSE: Youth with disabilities are under-represented in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) in school and in the workforce. One encouraging approach to engage youth's interest in STEM is through robotics; however, such programs are mostly for typically developing youth. The purpose of this study was to understand the development and implementation of an adapted robotics program for children and youth with disabilities and their experiences within it. METHOD: Our mixed methods pilot study (pre- and post-workshop surveys, observations, and interviews) involved 41 participants including: 18 youth (aged 6-13), 12 parents and 11 key informants...
October 20, 2016: Disability and Rehabilitation. Assistive Technology
Djordje Mirkovic, Phillip M Stepanian, Jeffrey F Kelly, Phillip B Chilson
The radar scattering characteristics of aerial animals are typically obtained from controlled laboratory measurements of a freshly harvested specimen. These measurements are tedious to perform, difficult to replicate, and typically yield only a small subset of the full azimuthal, elevational, and polarimetric radio scattering data. As an alternative, biological applications of radar often assume that the radar cross sections of flying animals are isotropic, since sophisticated computer models are required to estimate the 3D scattering properties of objects having complex shapes...
October 20, 2016: Scientific Reports
Jae M Sevelius, Madeline B Deutsch, Robert Grant
INTRODUCTION: Globally, transgender ("trans") women are one of the key populations most disproportionately impacted by HIV. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is the newest and most promising biomedical HIV prevention intervention to date. This paper reviews relevant literature to describe the current state of the science and describes the potential role of PrEP among trans women, including a discussion of unique considerations for maximizing the impact of PrEP for this vulnerable population...
2016: Journal of the International AIDS Society
Jakub Tomek, Rebecca A B Burton, Gil Bub
Cardiac arrhythmias are one of the most frequent causes of death worldwide. A popular biological model used to study arrhythmogenesis is the cultured cardiac cell monolayer, which provides a good trade-off between physiological relevance and experimental access. Excitation wave patterns are imaged using high-bandwidth detectors, producing large data sets that are typically analyzed manually. To make such analysis less time consuming and less subjective, we have designed and implemented a toolkit for segmentation and tracking of cardiac waves in optical mapping recordings...
October 18, 2016: Biophysical Journal
Shannon Dorsey, Katie A McLaughlin, Suzanne E U Kerns, Julie P Harrison, Hilary K Lambert, Ernestine C Briggs, Julia Revillion Cox, Lisa Amaya-Jackson
Child and adolescent trauma exposure is prevalent, with trauma exposure-related symptoms, including posttraumatic stress, depressive, and anxiety symptoms often causing substantial impairment. This article updates the evidence base on psychosocial treatments for child and adolescent trauma exposure completed for this journal by Silverman et al. (2008). For this review, we focus on 37 studies conducted during the seven years since the last review. Treatments are grouped by overall treatment family (e.g., cognitive behavioral therapy), treatment modality (e...
October 19, 2016: Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology
Ali Garavand, Mohammah Mohseni, Heshmatollah Asadi, Manal Etemadi, Mohammad Moradi-Joo, Ahmad Moosavi
INTRODUCTION: The successful implementation of health information technologies requires investigating the factors affecting the acceptance and use of them. The aim of this study was to determine the most important factors affecting the adoption of health information technologies by doing a systematic review on the factors affecting the acceptance of health information technology. METHODS: This systematic review was conducted by searching the major databases, such as Google Scholar, Emerald, Science Direct, Web of Science, Pubmed, and Scopus...
August 2016: Electronic Physician
Sandy Middleton, Chris Levi, Simeon Dale, N Wah Cheung, Elizabeth McInnes, Julie Considine, Catherine D'Este, Dominique A Cadilhac, Jeremy Grimshaw, Richard Gerraty, Louise Craig, Verena Schadewaldt, Patrick McElduff, Mark Fitzgerald, Clare Quinn, Greg Cadigan, Sonia Denisenko, Mark Longworth, Jeanette Ward
BACKGROUND: Internationally recognised evidence-based guidelines recommend appropriate triage of patients with stroke in emergency departments (EDs), administration of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), and proactive management of fever, hyperglycaemia and swallowing before prompt transfer to a stroke unit to maximise outcomes. We aim to evaluate the effectiveness in EDs of a theory-informed, nurse-initiated, intervention to improve multidisciplinary triage, treatment and transfer (T(3)) of patients with acute stroke to improve 90-day death and dependency...
October 18, 2016: Implementation Science: IS
Nicola Mackintosh, Marius Terblanche, Ritesh Maharaj, Andreas Xyrichis, Karen Franklin, Jamie Keddie, Emily Larkins, Anna Maslen, James Skinner, Samuel Newman, Joana Hiew De Sousa Magalhaes, Jane Sandall
BACKGROUND: Telemedicine applications aim to address variance in clinical outcomes and increase access to specialist expertise. Despite widespread implementation, there is little robust evidence about cost-effectiveness, clinical benefits, and impact on quality and safety of critical care telemedicine. The primary objective was to determine the impact of critical care telemedicine (with clinical decision support available 24/7) on intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital mortality and length of stay in adults and children...
October 18, 2016: Systematic Reviews
Ana I Robles, Karina Standahl Olsen, Dana W T Tsui, Vassilis Georgoulias, Jenette Creaney, Katalin Dobra, Mogens Vyberg, Nagahiro Minato, Robert A Anders, Anne-Lise Børresen-Dale, Jianwei Zhou, Pål Sætrom, Boye Schnack Nielsen, Michaela B Kirschner, Hans E Krokan, Vassiliki Papadimitrakopoulou, Ioannis Tsamardinos, Oluf D Røe
The goal of biomarker research is to identify clinically valid markers. Despite decades of research there has been disappointingly few molecules or techniques that are in use today. The "1st International NTNU Symposium on Current and Future Clinical Biomarkers of Cancer: Innovation and Implementation", was held June 16th and 17th 2016, at the Knowledge Center of the St. Olavs Hospital in Trondheim, Norway, under the auspices of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) and the HUNT biobank and research center...
October 19, 2016: Journal of Translational Medicine
M Schrappe, H Pfaff
In Germany, Health Services Research (HSR) is undergoing rapid and impressive development. Starting from the translation of methods in individual health care (efficacy-effectiveness gap) and the social-scientific description as well as analysis of health care structures and processes, now it is the implementation of complex interventions on the organizational and system level that is the center of interest. This development is mainly triggered by the establishment of the so-called innovation funds by means of legislation in 2015, which has the task to evaluate structural changes and reforms in outpatient and integrated health care...
October 18, 2016: Das Gesundheitswesen
Francesco Cappuccio
The evidence. Salt (i.e. sodium chloride) is causally related to blood pressure (BP). The higher the salt intake, the higher the BP, an effect seen since birth. A small and sustained reduction in salt intake causes a fall in BP. The evidence from controlled studies, small and large, short and long, all agree on the following: (1) salt intake is one of the major determinants of BP in populations and individuals; (2) a reduction in salt intake causes a dose-dependent reduction in BP - the lower the salt the lower the BP; (3) the effect is seen in both sexes, in people of all ages and ethnic groups, and with all starting BPs...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Cathleen C Pettepher, Kimberly D Lomis, Neil Osheroff
Physicians-in-training require skills and attitudes beyond medical knowledge in order to mature into successful clinicians. However, because assessments in pre-clerkship curricula historically have focused almost exclusively on medical knowledge, faculty contributions to early student development often have been limited. To address this challenge and enhance student progress, we re-designed our pre-clerkship curriculum to include settings in which diverse facets of student performance could be observed and fostered...
September 2016: Medical Science Educator
Aliki Thomas, André Bussières
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 4, 2016: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
Sairam Parthasarathy, Mary A Carskadon, Girardin Jean-Louis, Judith Owens, Adam Bramoweth, Daniel Combs, Lauren Hale, Elizabeth Harrison, Chantelle N Hart, Brant P Hasler, Sarah M Honaker, Elisabeth Hertenstein, Samuel Kuna, Clete Kushida, Jessica C Levenson, Caitlin Murray, Allan I Pack, Vivek Pillai, Kristi Pruiksma, Azizi Seixas, Patrick Strollo, Saurabh S Thosar, Natasha Williams, Daniel Buysse
A wealth of scientific knowledge is being generated in sleep and circadian science. In order for us to realize the return on investment for such scientific knowledge and to improve the health of the nation, we need to disseminate and implement research findings into practice. An implementation gap - termed a "quality chasm" by the Institutes of Medicine - separates the scientific knowledge we possess and the implementation of such knowledge into preventative interventions or healthcare treatments. It is frequently reported that a time lag of 17 years transpires before medical research reaches clinical practice...
October 10, 2016: Sleep
Oscar Wambuguh, Monika Eckfield, Lynn Van Hofwegen
Baccalaureate nursing programs select students likely to graduate, become licensed, and contribute to a diverse workforce, and admissions criteria need to support those goals. This study assessed five criteria: pre-admit science GPA; TEAS score; healthcare experience; previous baccalaureate degree; and pre-admission university enrollment vs. college transfer as predictors of three desired outcomes: graduation; nursing program GPA; and passing NCLEX-RN. Results found TEAS and pre-admit science GPA predicted nursing program outcomes...
September 20, 2016: International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship
Sascha Nehr, Elisabeth Hösen, Shin-Ichi Tanabe
Despite the fact that the special characteristics of indoor air pollution make closed environments quite different from outdoor environments, the conceptual ideas for assessing air quality indoors and outdoors are similar. Therefore, the elaboration of International Standards for air quality characterization in view of controlling indoor air quality should resort to this common basis. In this short review we describe the possibilities of standardization of tools dedicated to indoor air quality characterization with a focus on the tools permitting to study the indoor air chemistry...
October 11, 2016: Environment International
John V Thomas, Rupan Sanyal, Janis P O'Malley, Satinder P Singh, Desiree E Morgan, Cheri L Canon
The academic educator's portfolio is a collection of materials that document academic performance and achievements, supplementing the curriculum vitae, in order to showcase a faculty member's most significant accomplishments. A decade ago, a survey of medical schools revealed frustration in the nonuniform methods of measuring faculty's medical education productivity. A proposed solution was the use of an academic educator's portfolio. In the academic medical community, compiling an academic portfolio is always a challenge because teaching has never been confined to the traditional classroom setting and often involves active participation of the medical student, resident, or fellow in the ongoing care of the patient...
October 11, 2016: Academic Radiology
Natalija Topić Popović, Snježana P Kazazić, Ivančica Strunjak-Perović, Rozelindra Čož-Rakovac
Identification of bacteria in aquatic and environmental applications, for monitoring purposes and research, for health assessments and therapy considerations of farmed and free-living aquatic organisms, still relies on conventional phenotypic and biochemical protocols. Although molecular techniques based on DNA amplification and sequencing are finding ways into diagnostic laboratories, they are time-consuming, costly and difficult in the case of multiplex assays. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is a rapid and accurate proteomic method reliable for identification of unknown bacteria to the genus and species level...
October 11, 2016: Environmental Research
Curtis H Weiss, Jerry A Krishnan, David H Au, Bruce G Bender, Shannon S Carson, Adithya Cattamanchi, Michelle M Cloutier, Colin R Cooke, Karen Erickson, Maureen George, Joe K Gerald, Lynn B Gerald, Christopher H Goss, Michael K Gould, Robert Hyzy, Jeremy M Kahn, Brian S Mittman, Erika M Mosesón, Richard A Mularski, Sairam Parthasarathy, Sanjay R Patel, Cynthia S Rand, Nancy S Redeker, Theodore F Reiss, Kristin A Riekert, Gordon D Rubenfeld, Judith A Tate, Kevin C Wilson, Carey C Thomson
BACKGROUND: Many advances in health care fail to reach patients. Implementation science is the study of novel approaches to mitigate this evidence-to-practice gap. METHODS: The American Thoracic Society (ATS) created a multidisciplinary ad hoc committee to develop a research statement on implementation science in pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine. The committee used an iterative consensus process to define implementation science and review the use of conceptual frameworks to guide implementation science for the pulmonary, critical care, and sleep community and to explore how professional medical societies such as the ATS can promote implementation science...
October 15, 2016: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
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