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Airway cardiac arrest

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28627349/-clinical-application-of-cardiopulmonary-resuscitation-with-abdominal-lifting-and-compression-in-emergency-treatment
#1
Jie Wang, Guolan Wu, Ronghua Yang, Yonghong Wang, Shunping Wang, Honglin Li, Shouhui Wang, Manguo Zhao, Xusheng Li, Yan Peng
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the clinical value of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with abdominal lifting and compression on patients with breathing and cardiac arrest induced by severe chest trauma. METHODS: Sixty-six breathing and cardiac arrest patients induced by severe chest trauma admitted to the General Hospital of Jingyuan Coal Industry Group Company from October 2011 to October 2016 were enrolled, and they were divided into abdominal lifting and compression group (n = 32) and unarmed abdominal compression group (n = 34) by random number table...
March 2017: Zhonghua Wei Zhong Bing Ji Jiu Yi Xue
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28625243/-experimental-study-on-effect-of-airway-pressure-on-cardiopulmonary-resuscitation
#2
Dingyu Tan, Feng Sun, Yangyang Fu, Shihuan Shao, Yazhi Zhang, Yingying Hu, Jun Xu, Huadong Zhu, Xuezhong Yu
OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of different airway pressure on ventilation, organ perfusion and return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) of cardiac arrest (CA) pigs during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and to explore the possible beneficial mechanism of positive airway pressure during CPR. METHODS: Twenty healthy landrace pigs of clean grade were divided into low airway pressure group (LP group, n = 10) and high airway pressure group (HP group, n = 10) with random number table...
June 2017: Zhonghua Wei Zhong Bing Ji Jiu Yi Xue
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28594858/factors-associated-with-delayed-defibrillation-in-cardiopulmonary-resuscitation-a-prospective-simulation-study
#3
Christoph Castan, Alexander Münch, Moritz Mahling, Leopold Haffner, Jan Griewatz, Anne Hermann-Werner, Reimer Riessen, Jörg Reutershan, Nora Celebi
INTRODUCTION: Early defibrillation is an important factor of survival in cardiac arrest. However, novice resuscitators often struggle with cardiac arrest patients. We investigated factors leading to delayed defibrillation performed by final-year medical students within a simulated bystander cardiac arrest situation. METHODS: Final-year medical students received a refresher lecture and basic life support training before being confronted with a simulated cardiac arrest situation in a simulation ambulance...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28584212/variations-of-postresuscitation-lung-function-after-thrombolysis-therapy-in-a-cardiac-arrest-porcine-model-caused-by-pulmonary-thromboembolism
#4
Jun Yang, Lian-Xing Zhao, Chun-Sheng Li, Nan Tong, Hong-Li Xiao, Le An
BACKGROUND: Study of lung function in survivor from cardiac arrest (CA) caused by pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) was rare. The aim of this study was to investigate the variations of postresuscitation lung function after thrombolysis treatment in a CA porcine model caused by PTE. METHODS: After 2 min of untreated CA, pigs of 10-12 weeks with a weight of 30 ± 2 kg (n = 24) were treated with recombinant human tissue plasminogen activator (50 mg). Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and ventilation were initiated after drug administration...
June 20, 2017: Chinese Medical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28559038/nonphysician-out-of-hospital-rapid-sequence-intubation-success-and-adverse-events-a%C3%A2-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#5
REVIEW
Pieter F Fouche, Christopher Stein, Paul Simpson, Jestin N Carlson, Suhail A Doi
STUDY OBJECTIVE: Rapid sequence intubation performed by nonphysicians such as paramedics or nurses has become increasingly common in many countries; however, concerns have been stated in regard to the safe use and appropriateness of rapid sequence intubation when performed by these health care providers. The aim of our study is to compare rapid sequence intubation success and adverse events between nonphysician and physician in the out-of-hospital setting. METHODS: A systematic literature search of key databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library was conducted...
May 27, 2017: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28555461/high-flow-nasal-cannulae-for-respiratory-support-in-adult-intensive-care-patients
#6
REVIEW
Amanda Corley, Claire M Rickard, Leanne M Aitken, Amy Johnston, Adrian Barnett, John F Fraser, Sharon R Lewis, Andrew F Smith
BACKGROUND: High-flow nasal cannulae (HFNC) deliver high flows of blended humidified air and oxygen via wide-bore nasal cannulae and may be useful in providing respiratory support for adult patients experiencing acute respiratory failure in the intensive care unit (ICU). OBJECTIVES: We evaluated studies that included participants 16 years of age and older who were admitted to the ICU and required treatment with HFNC. We assessed the safety and efficacy of HFNC compared with comparator interventions in terms of treatment failure, mortality, adverse events, duration of respiratory support, hospital and ICU length of stay, respiratory effects, patient-reported outcomes, and costs of treatment...
May 30, 2017: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28550957/feasibility-of-a-supraglottic-airway-device-for-transbronchial-lung-cryobiopsy-a-retrospective-analysis
#7
Axel Schmutz, Thorsten Dürk, Marco Idzko, Thomas Koehler, Johannes Kalbhenn, Torsten Loop
OBJECTIVES: To determine the feasibility of a supraglottic airway device for transbronchial cryobiopsy in adults. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of anesthetic and pulmonary records between March 2015 and August 2016. SETTING: Single university medical center. PARTICIPANTS: One hundred thirty-two patients who underwent transbronchial cryobiopsy procedures performed under general anesthesia. INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable...
February 16, 2017: Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28549578/pediatric-out-of-hospital-cardiac-arrest-caused-by-left-coronary-artery-agenesis-with-primary-shockable-rhythm-a-brief-report
#8
Moritz Weigeldt, Sabine Lahmann, Konstantin Krieger, Sebastian Buttenberg, Volker Stephan, Brigitte Stiller, Dirk Stengel
BACKGROUND: To illustrate a rare cause of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in children, its differential diagnoses, emergency and subsequent treatment at various steps in the rescue chain, and potential outcomes. CASE PRESENTATION: A 4-year-old boy with unknown agenesis of the left coronary ostium sustained out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Bystander cardio-pulmonary resuscitation was initiated and defibrillation was performed via an automated external defibrillator (AED) shortly after paramedics arrived at the scene, restoring sinus rhythm and spontaneous circulation...
May 11, 2017: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28508288/repetitive-postoperative-extubation-failure-and-cardiac-arrest-due-to-laryngomalacia-after-general-anesthesia-in-an-elderly-patient-a-case-report
#9
Jun Takeshita, Kei Nishiyama, Masashi Fujii, Hiroyuki Tanaka, Satoru Beppu, Nozomu Sasahashi, Nobuaki Shime
The authors report a case involving an elderly patient who experienced repetitive perioperative cardiac arrest caused by laryngomalacia. The patient underwent surgery under general anesthesia; however, 2 h after initial extubation, he experienced cardiopulmonary arrest. Return of spontaneous circulation was achieved by immediate resuscitation. Four hours later, a second extubation was performed without any neurological complications. However, 2 h later, he experienced cardiopulmonary arrest again. Immediately after the third extubation, 12 h after the second cardiopulmonary arrest, fiberoptic laryngoscopy revealed laryngomalacia...
May 15, 2017: Journal of Anesthesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28488002/experience-with-the-use-of-propofol-for-radiologic-imaging-in-infants-younger-than-6-months-of-age
#10
Elan Jenkins, Kiran B Hebbar, Katie K Karaga, Daniel A Hirsh, James D Fortenberry, Courtney E McCracken, Stephen F Simoneaux, Michael D Mallory, Pradip P Kamat
BACKGROUND: There is an increased risk associated with procedural sedation of infants younger than 6 months of age. The use of propofol for radiologic imaging of this age group is not well studied. OBJECTIVE: We hypothesize that adverse events are higher in the infant population receiving propofol for radiologic imaging. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective chart review was undertaken of 304 infants younger than 6 months old who received propofol for procedural sedation from October 2012 to February 2015...
May 9, 2017: Pediatric Radiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28486897/effect-of-pre-hospital-advanced-airway-management-for-out-of-hospital-cardiac-arrest-caused-by-respiratory-disease-a-propensity-score-matched-study
#11
N Ohashi-Fukuda, T Fukuda, N Yahagi
Optimal pre-hospital care for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) caused by respiratory disease may differ from that for OHCA associated with other aetiologies, especially with respect to respiratory management. We aimed to investigate whether pre-hospital advanced airway management (AAM) was associated with favourable outcomes after OHCA caused by intrinsic respiratory disease. This nationwide, population-based, propensity score-matched study of adult patients in Japan with OHCA due to respiratory disease from 1 January 2005 to 31 December 2012 compared patients with and without pre-hospital AAM...
May 2017: Anaesthesia and Intensive Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28463098/when-is-a-cardiac-arrest-non-cardiac
#12
Ryan M Carter, David C Cone
Introduction While the overall survival rate for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is low, ranging from 5%-10%, several characteristics have been shown to decrease mortality, such as presence of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), witnessed vs unwitnessed events, and favorable initial rhythm (VF/VT). More recently, studies have shown that modified CPR algorithms, such as chest-compression only or cardio-cerebral resuscitation, can further increase survival rates in OHCA. Most of these studies have included only OHCA patients with "presumed cardiac etiology," on the assumption that airway management is of lesser impact than chest compressions in these patients...
May 2, 2017: Prehospital and Disaster Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28459305/advanced-airway-type-and-its-association-with-chest-compression-interruptions-during-out-of-hospital-cardiac-arrest-resuscitation-attempts
#13
Angela F Jarman, Christy L Hopkins, J Nicholas Hansen, Jonathan R Brown, Christopher Burk, Scott T Youngquist
OBJECTIVE: To assess interruptions in chest compressions associated with advanced airway placement during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) victims. METHODS: The method used was observational analysis of prospectively collected clinical and defibrillator data from 339 adult OHCA victims, excluding victims with <5 minutes of CPR. Interruptions in CPR, summarized by chest compression fraction (CCF), longest pause, and the number of pauses greater than 10 seconds, were compared between patients receiving bag valve mask (BVM), supraglottic airway (SGA), endotracheal intubation (ETI) via direct laryngoscopy (DL), and ETI via video laryngoscopy (VL)...
May 1, 2017: Prehospital Emergency Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28458759/effect-of-metronome-rates-on-the-quality-of-bag-mask-ventilation-during-metronome-guided-30-2-cardiopulmonary-resuscitation-a-randomized-simulation-study
#14
Ji Ung Na, Sang Kuk Han, Pil Cho Choi, Dong Hyuk Shin
BACKGROUND: Metronome guidance is a feasible and effective feedback technique to improve the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The rate of the metronome should be set between 100 to 120 ticks/minute and the speed of ventilation may have crucial effect on the quality of ventilation. We compared three different metronome rates (100, 110, 120 ticks/minute) to investigate its effect on the quality of ventilation during metronome-guided 30:2 CPR. METHODS: This is a prospective, randomized, crossover observational study using a RespiTrainer○(r)...
2017: World Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28404450/does-lying-in-the-recovery-position-increase-the-likelihood-of-not-delivering-cardiopulmonary-resuscitation
#15
Miguel Freire-Tellado, Rubén Navarro-Patón, Maria Del Pilar Pavón-Prieto, Marta Fernández-López, Javier Mateos-Lorenzo, Ivan López-Fórneas
BACKGROUND: Resuscitation guidelines endorse unconscious and normally breathing out-of-hospital victims to be placed in the recovery position to secure airway patency, but recently a debate has been opened as to whether the recovery position threatens the cardiac arrest victim's safety assessment and delays the start of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. AIM: To compare the assessment of the victim's breathing arrest while placed in the recovery position versus maintaining an open airway with the continuous head tilt and chin lift technique to know whether the recovery position delays the cardiac arrest victim's assessment and the start of cardiopulmonary resuscitation...
June 2017: Resuscitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28402986/no-small-matter-pediatric-resuscitation
#16
Taylor McCormick, Kevin McVaney, Paul E Pepe
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To present advancements in pediatric cardiac arrest research, highlighting articles most relevant to clinical practice published since the latest international guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). RECENT FINDINGS: Clinical trials examining targeted temperature management in children support avoidance of hyperthermia for both pediatric in-hospital cardiac arrest (PIHCA) and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (POHCA), but no statistically significant outcome differences were confirmed comparing 33 and 36 °C in the limited populations studied...
June 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28379867/metrics-save-lives-value-and-hurdles-faced
#17
Jeffrey M Goodloe, Ahamed H Idris
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Affirmation of the importance of precision in fundamentals of resuscitation practices with improving neurologically intact survival from sudden cardiac arrest, correlated with both measurements of resuscitation metrics generically and recently further refined metric parameters specifically. RECENT FINDINGS: Quality of baseline cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in historic intervention trials may not be 'high quality' as once assumed. Optimal chest compression rates are within the narrow spectrum of 106-108/min for adults...
June 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28366715/twenty-years-of-anesthetic-and-perioperative-management-of-patients-with-tetralogy-of-fallot-with-absent-pulmonary-valve
#18
John D Jochman, Douglas B Atkinson, Luis G Quinonez, Morgan L Brown
OBJECTIVE: Review the authors' institutional experience of the induction and perioperative airway management of children with tetralogy of Fallot with an absent pulmonary valve. DESIGN: Retrospective chart review. SETTING: Large academic children's hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Patients with the diagnosis of tetralogy of Fallot with absent pulmonary valve undergoing primary cardiac repair over a 20-year period. INTERVENTIONS: None...
February 4, 2017: Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28363752/are-prehospital-deaths-from-trauma-and-accidental-injury-preventable-a-direct-historical-comparison-to-assess-what-has-changed-in-two-decades
#19
G J Oliver, D P Walter, A D Redmond
BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES: In 1994, Hussain and Redmond revealed that up to 39% of prehospital deaths from accidental injury might have been preventable had basic first aid care been given. Since then there have been significant advances in trauma systems and care. The exclusion of prehospital deaths from the analysis of trauma registries, giv en the high rate of those, is a major limitation in prehospital research on preventable death. We have repeated the 1994 study to identify any changes over the years and potential developments to improve patient outcomes...
May 2017: Injury
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28335785/we-need-to-include-bystander-first-aid-in-trauma-research
#20
Håkon Kvåle Bakke, Torben Wisborg
BACKGROUND: The chain of trauma survival is a concept that originated in the area of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and was adapted to the treatment of trauma. In out-of-hospital cardiac arrest research into bystander first aid has resulted in improved outcome. Whereas, in trauma research the first link of the chain of survival is almost ignored. METHODS: In OHCA, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) from bystanders has been subject of a vast amount of research, as well as measures and programs to raise the rate of bystander CPR to cardiac arrest victims...
March 23, 2017: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
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