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Immunology neonates

J Jiang, S L Dai, J F Xu, Y Zou, L G Zhu, H Peng, F C Zhu, X J Zhai
Objective: To evaluate the effects of blocking transmission of HBV from mother to infant in Jiangsu, and discuss influencing factors related to development of chronic HBV infection in children of HBsAg positive mother. Methods: HBsAg positive mothers delivered during 2010-2015 in three counties of Jiangsu (Zhangjiagang, Danyang and Taixing) and their neonates were included in the study. The neonates were vaccinated with hepatitis B vaccine (10 μg) and hepatitis B immunoglobin (100 units) within 24 hours after birth...
October 10, 2016: Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue za Zhi, Zhonghua Liuxingbingxue Zazhi
Aran Singanayagam, Andrew I Ritchie, Sebastian L Johnston
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The emergence of next-generation 16S rRNA sequencing techniques has facilitated a more detailed study of the body's microbiota and led to renewed interest in the association between microbial exposure and asthma inception. In this review, we evaluate the evidence that the respiratory tract and intestinal microbiota contribute to asthma pathogenesis and progression. RECENT FINDINGS: Human studies have revealed associations between the presence of potentially pathogenic bacteria in the respiratory tract in early life and subsequent risk of allergic sensitization and asthma...
October 15, 2016: Current Opinion in Pulmonary Medicine
Peter Nilsson
A number of chronic disease conditions tend to cluster in families with an increased risk in first-degree relatives, but also an increased risk in second-degree relatives. This fact is most often referred to as the heritability (heredity) of these diseases and explained by the influence of genetic factors, or shared environment, even if the more specific details or mechanism leading to disease are not known. New methods have to be explored in screening studies and register linkage studies to define and measure consequences of a positive family history of disease...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Ariane Roemer, Ulrike Köhl, Omid Majdani, Stephan Klöß, Christine Falk, Sabine Haumann, Thomas Lenarz, Andrej Kral, Athanasia Warnecke
BACKGROUND: The success of cochlear implantation may be further improved by minimizing implantation trauma. The physical trauma of implantation and subsequent immunological sequelae can affect residual hearing and the viability of the spiral ganglion. An ideal electrode should therefore decrease post-implantation trauma and provide support to the residual spiral ganglion population. Combining a flexible electrode with cells producing and releasing protective factors could present a potential means to achieve this...
October 7, 2016: Stem Cell Research & Therapy
Jennifer R Bermick, Nathalie J Lambrecht, Aaron D denDekker, Steven L Kunkel, Nicholas W Lukacs, Cory M Hogaboam, Matthew A Schaller
BACKGROUND: Neonates have dampened expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and difficulty clearing pathogens. This makes them uniquely susceptible to infections, but the factors regulating neonatal-specific immune responses are poorly understood. Epigenetics, including histone modifications, can activate or silence gene transcription by modulating chromatin structure and stability without affecting the DNA sequence itself and are potentially modifiable. Histone modifications are known to regulate immune cell differentiation and function in adults but have not been well studied in neonates...
2016: Clinical Epigenetics
Sam Mehr, Roger Allen, Christina Boros, Navid Adib, Alyson Kakakios, Paul J Turner, Maureen Rogers, Yvonne Zurynski, Davinder Singh-Grewal
AIM: Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) encapsulate three auto-inflammatory conditions, ranging in severity from mild (familial cold auto-inflammatory syndrome: FCAS), moderate (Muckle-Wells syndrome: MWS) and severe (neonatal onset multi-inflammatory disorder: NOMID). We aimed to describe the epidemiology, clinical features and outcomes of Australian children and adults with CAPS. METHODS: Patients were identified and clinical data collected through a questionnaire sent during 2012-2013 to clinicians reporting to the Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit and subscribing to the Australasian Societies for Allergy/Immunology, Rheumatology and Dermatology...
September 2016: Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health
Virginie de Halleux, Catherine Pieltain, Thibault Senterre, Jacques Rigo
Own mother's milk is the first choice in feeding preterm infants and provides multiple short- and long-term benefits. When it is unavailable, donor human milk is recommended as the first alternative. Donor milk undergoes processing (i.e. pasteurization) to reduce bacteriological and viral contaminants but influences its bioactive properties with potentially fewer benefits than raw milk. However, there is no clinical evidence of health benefit of raw compared to pasteurized human milk, and donor milk maintains documented advantages compared to formula...
September 16, 2016: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
N Torow, B J Marsland, M W Hornef, E S Gollwitzer
Although largely deprived from exogenous stimuli in utero, the mucosal barriers of the neonate after birth are bombarded by environmental, nutritional, and microbial exposures. The microbiome is established concurrently with the developing immune system. The nature and timing of discrete interactions between these two factors underpins the long-term immune characteristics of these organs, and can set an individual on a trajectory towards or away from disease. Microbial exposures in the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts are some of the key determinants of the overall immune tone at these mucosal barriers and represent a leading target for future intervention strategies...
September 21, 2016: Mucosal Immunology
Bettina Mavrommatis, Lucie Baudino, Prisca Levy, Julia Merkenschlager, Urszula Eksmond, Tiziano Donnarumma, George Young, Jonathan Stoye, George Kassiotis
Elucidation of the immune requirements for control or elimination of retroviral infection remains an important aim. We studied the induction of adaptive immunity to neonatal infection with a murine retrovirus, under conditions leading to immunological tolerance. We found that the absence of either maternal or offspring adaptive immunity permitted efficient vertical transmission of the retrovirus. Maternal immunodeficiency allowed the retrovirus to induce central Th cell tolerance in the infected offspring. In turn, this compromised the offspring's ability to mount a protective Th cell-dependent B cell response...
September 19, 2016: Journal of Immunology: Official Journal of the American Association of Immunologists
Peter Nilsson
A number of chronic disease conditions tend to cluster in families with an increased risk in first-degree relatives, but also an increased risk in second-degree relatives. This fact is most often referred to as the heritability (heredity) of these diseases and explained by the influence of genetic factors, or shared environment, even if the more specific details or mechanism leading to disease are not known. New methods have to be explored in screening studies and register linkage studies to define and measure consequences of a positive family history of disease...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Filip A Dabrowski, Anna Burdzinska, Agnieszka Kulesza, Marcin Chlebus, Beata Kaleta, Jan Borysowski, Aleksandra Zolocinska, Leszek Paczek, Miroslaw Wielgos
BACKGROUND/AIM: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are gaining rising interest in gynecology and obstetrics. MSCs immunomodulatory properties are suitable enough to reduce perinatal morbidity caused by inflammation in premature neonates. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the ability to inhibit allo-activated lymphocytes proliferation by MSCs derived from different sources: amniotic membrane (AM), umbilical cord (UC) and adipose tissue (AT). METHODS: MSCs were isolated from AM (n = 7) and UC (n = 6) and AT (n = 6) of healthy women...
September 15, 2016: Gynecologic and Obstetric Investigation
T Sun, O L Rojas, C Li, L A Ward, D J Philpott, J L Gommerman
Although we know a great deal about which types of dendritic cells (DCs) promote T-cell priming in the periphery, less is known about which DC subset(s) provoke antiviral responses within the gut. Here we report that conventional Zbtb46-dependent DCs were critically required for antiviral CD8(+) T-cell responses against rotavirus (RV), the major cause of childhood gastroenteritis worldwide. Furthermore, we found that in adult mice, Batf3-dependent DCs were required for generating optimal RV-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses...
September 7, 2016: Mucosal Immunology
Wei Wang, Li Xue, Tongsheng Ma, Yuan Li, Zhenguang Li
The pathogenesis of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is not well understood but immunological factors are thought to be key determinants of the disease appearance and its prognosis. During the course of the present study, different groups of newborn infants were observed and tested, to obtain an accurate image of values of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines at the onset, development and progression of neonatal NEC and to compare the values to those obtained during normal healthy development. All the infants in the study received standard medical treatment as appropriate...
September 2016: Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine
Derek Dc Ireland, Cecilia Tami, Joao Pedras-Vasconcelos, Daniela Verthelyi
Neonates are at increased risk of viral encephalopathies that can result in neurological dysfunction, seizures, permanent disability and even death. The neurological damage results from the combined effect of the virus and the immune response it elicits, thus finding tools to facilitate viral clearance from central nervous system (CNS) while minimizing neuron damage remains a critical challenge. Neonatal mice inoculated intraperitoneally with Tacaribe virus (TCRV) develop seizures, hindlimb paralysis and death within 15 days of inoculation...
August 29, 2016: Cellular & Molecular Immunology
Sabine Huenecke, Esther Fryns, Boris Wittekindt, Horst Buxmann, Christoph Königs, Andrea Quaiser, Doris Fischer, Melanie Bremm, Thomas Klingebiel, Ulrike Koehl, Rolf Schloesser, Konrad Bochennek
Preterm newborns show an increased susceptibility to infections, conceivably related to their immature immune system. To gain further knowledge about the immune development in early preterm infants, we aimed to establish references for lymphocyte subsets and compare the maturation process during hospitalization to healthy term-born children and adolescents. For this purpose peripheral blood samples (n=153) were collected from 40 preterm infants; gestational age (GA) 26 to 30 week between 2(nd) and 6(th) day of life and were monitored in intervals of every 2 or rather 4 weeks until the end of hospitalization...
August 22, 2016: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology
Sara Manti, Lucia Marseglia, Gabriella D'Angelo, Caterina Cuppari, Erika Cusumano, Teresa Arrigo, Eloisa Gitto, Carmelo Salpietro
Although extensive epidemiological and laboratory studies have been performed to identify the environmental and immunological causes of atopy, genetic predisposition seems to be the biggest risk factor for allergic diseases. The onset of atopic diseases may be the result of heritable changes of gene expression, without any alteration in DNA sequences occurring in response to early environmental stimuli. Findings suggest that the establishment of a peculiar epigenetic pattern may also be generated by oxidative stress (OS) and perpetuated by the activation of OS-related genes...
2016: Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Jose G Cecatti, Renato T Souza, Karolina Sulek, Maria L Costa, Louise C Kenny, Lesley M McCowan, Rodolfo C Pacagnella, Silas G Villas-Boas, Jussara Mayrink, Renato Passini, Kleber G Franchini, Philip N Baker
BACKGROUND: Spontaneous preterm birth is a complex syndrome with multiple pathways interactions determining its occurrence, including genetic, immunological, physiologic, biochemical and environmental factors. Despite great worldwide efforts in preterm birth prevention, there are no recent effective therapeutic strategies able to decrease spontaneous preterm birth rates or their consequent neonatal morbidity/mortality. The Preterm SAMBA study will associate metabolomics technologies to identify clinical and metabolite predictors for preterm birth...
August 8, 2016: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
David Liuwantara, Yi Vee Chew, Emmanuel J Favaloro, Joanne M Hawkes, Heather L Burns, Philip J O'Connell, Wayne J Hawthorne
INTRODUCTION: The instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction (IBMIR) causes major loss of islets after transplantation and consequently represents the initial barrier to survival of porcine neonatal islet cell clusters (NICC) after xenotransplantation. METHODS: This study used novel assays designed to characterize the various immunologic components responsible for xenogeneic IBMIR to identify initiators and investigate processes of IBMIR-associated coagulation, complement activation and neutrophil infiltration...
June 2016: Transplantation Direct
Clifford B Kim, Patricia A D'Amore, Kip M Connor
Abnormal blood vessel growth in the retina is a hallmark of many retinal diseases, such as retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), proliferative diabetic retinopathy, and the wet form of age-related macular degeneration. In particular, ROP has been an important health concern for physicians since the advent of routine supplemental oxygen therapy for premature neonates more than 70 years ago. Since then, researchers have explored several animal models to better understand ROP and retinal vascular development. Of these models, the mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) has become the most widely used, and has played a pivotal role in our understanding of retinal angiogenesis and ocular immunology, as well as in the development of groundbreaking therapeutics such as anti-vascular endothelial growth factor injections for wet age-related macular degeneration...
2016: Eye and Brain
Nicoletta Di Simone, Chiara Tersigni, Simona Cardaropoli, Francesco Franceschi, Fiorella Di Nicuolo, Roberta Castellani, Francesca Bugli, Chiara de Waure, Anna Franca Cavaliere, Antonio Gasbarrini, Maurizio Sanguinetti, Giovanni Scambia, Tullia Todros
BACKGROUND: Preeclampsia (PE) is a major cause of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Epidemiological association between Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection and PE onset has been widely shown. The aim of this study was to analyze a possible correlation between Hp infection and the severity of clinical presentation of PE and to identify an immunologic mechanism triggered by Hp infection potentially contributing to the pathogenesis of PE. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sera from 93 preeclamptic women and 87 healthy pregnant women were tested for Hp infection by immunoassay and for anti-CagA antibodies by Western blot assay...
August 3, 2016: Helicobacter
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