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"income" AND "cardiovascular"

M A Beydoun, H A Beydoun, N Mode, G A Dore, J A Canas, S M Eid, A B Zonderman
BACKGROUND: Studies uncovering factors beyond socio-economic status (SES) that would explain racial and ethnic disparities in mortality are scarce. METHODS: Using prospective cohort data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III), we examined all-cause and cause-specific mortality disparities by race, mediation through key factors and moderation by age (20-49 vs. 50+), sex and poverty status. Cox proportional hazards, discrete-time hazards and competing risk regression models were conducted (N = 16,573 participants, n = 4207 deaths, Median time = 170 months (1-217 months))...
October 22, 2016: BMC Public Health
Robin Nance, Joseph Delaney, John W McEvoy, Michael J Blaha, Gregory Burke, Ana Navas-Acien, Joel D Kaufman, Elizabeth C Oelsner, Robyn L McClelland
OBJECTIVE: Smoking as an epidemiological exposure can be quantified in many ways including duration, intensity, pack-years, recency, and age at initiation. However it is not clear which of these are most important for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and how they should be modeled. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Using the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, Cox models for time to incident CVD adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education category, and income category were compared which included various characterizations of smoking history...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology
Stéphane Verguet, Solomon Tessema Memirie, Ole Frithjof Norheim
BACKGROUND: Out-of-pocket (OOP) medical expenses often lead to catastrophic expenditure and impoverishment in low- and middle-income countries. Yet, there has been no systematic examination of which specific diseases and conditions (e.g., tuberculosis, cardiovascular disease) drive medical impoverishment, defined as OOP direct medical costs pushing households into poverty. METHODS: We used a cost and epidemiological model to propose an assessment of the burden of medical impoverishment in Ethiopia, i...
October 21, 2016: BMC Medicine
Emma Aarnio, Janne Martikainen, Aaron N Winn, Risto Huupponen, Jussi Vahtera, Maarit J Korhonen
BACKGROUND: Previous research shows that low socioeconomic position (SEP; especially low income) is associated with statin nonadherence. We investigated the relationship between SEP and statin adherence in a country with universal coverage using group-based trajectory modeling in addition to the proportion of days covered. METHODS AND RESULTS: Using data from Finnish healthcare registers, we identified 116 846 individuals, aged 45 to 75 years, who initiated statin therapy for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease...
October 18, 2016: Circulation. Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes
Fares Karamat, Frederieke Diemer, Sergio Baldew, Glen Oehlers, Gert Van Montfrans, Lizzy Brewster
OBJECTIVE: The global burden of disease attributable to high blood pressure showed that 54% of stroke and 47% of ishaemic heart disease worldwide were due to hypertension. Hypertension is still the main risk factor for premature death worldwide and, in particular, in low- and middle-income countries. We aimed to assess prehypertension and hypertension prevalence among a predominantly Asian and African population living in urban Suriname, a middle-income country in South America. DESIGN AND METHOD: We used data from the Healthy Life in Suriname study, in which 1,152 men and women aged 18-70 y living in the capital were randomly selected...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Hongbo Dong, Yinkun Yan, Junting Liu, Xiaoyuan Zhao, Hong Cheng, Dongqing Hou, Guimin Huang, Jie Mi
OBJECTIVE: The American Heart Association's (AHA) 2020 Strategic Goals defined a new concept of cardiovascular health (CVH) for adults and children, emphasizing the importance of early prevention of risk factors. CV disease risk factors track from childhood to adulthood, which should be closely monitored over time. However, detailed data on the trends in CVH among children are sparse. Therefore, by adopting the construct from the AHA, the present study seeks to evaluate the changes of ideal CVH, as well as each component, among Chinese children and adolescents in Beijing...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Graham MacGregor
High salt intake is the major cause of raised blood pressure and accordingly leads to cardiovascular diseases. Recently, it has been shown that high salt intake is associated with an increased risk of obesity through sugar-sweetened beverage consumption. Increasing evidence also suggests a direct link. Our study aimed to determine whether there was a direct association between salt intake and obesity independent of energy intake. We analyzed the data from the rolling cross-sectional study-the UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey 2008/2009 to 2011/2012...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Juhwan Noh, Jungwoo Sohn, Jaelim Cho, Changsoo Kim, Dong Chun Shin
OBJECTIVE: Epidemiological studies have been published acute or chronic adverse association between ambient particulate matter and cardiovascular/respiratory diseases. Recently, there has been increased interest in investigating the role of fine particulate matter on major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE). For the long-term effects, the external validity of studies has rarely been satisfied due to the representativeness of cohorts. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential impact of fine particulate matter long-term exposure on MACE, defined as time to incidence of acute myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, or death due to cardiovascular cause...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Norm Campbell
Hypertension is the second leading global risk for death and disability after unhealthy diets. Amongst dietary risks, excess dietary salt (sodium) is the leading risk. As dietary sodium increases, blood pressure increases linearly. In meta-analyses of higher quality cohort studies and in a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials, higher dietary sodium is linearly associated with increased cardiovascular disease. There are an estimated xxxx deaths and xxx DALYs in 2013 from excess dietary sodium. The World Health Organization has a recommended sodium (salt) intake of less than 2000 mg (5 g)/day with the World Health Assembly setting a voluntary target of a 30% reduction by 2025...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Francesco Cappuccio
The evidence. Salt (i.e. sodium chloride) is causally related to blood pressure (BP). The higher the salt intake, the higher the BP, an effect seen since birth. A small and sustained reduction in salt intake causes a fall in BP. The evidence from controlled studies, small and large, short and long, all agree on the following: (1) salt intake is one of the major determinants of BP in populations and individuals; (2) a reduction in salt intake causes a dose-dependent reduction in BP - the lower the salt the lower the BP; (3) the effect is seen in both sexes, in people of all ages and ethnic groups, and with all starting BPs...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Aletta Schutte
Cardiovascular risk prediction has developed significantly during recent years, as cardiovascular disease prevention guidelines recommend risk scores to identify patients at high and low risk. Where novel biomarkers were identified in recent years, it is simply impractical and expensive to perform laboratory testing as part of screening for non-communicable diseases in low- and middle-income countries. As part of a broader consortium we compared the ranking performance of a simple, non-laboratory-based risk score to laboratory-based scores in various South African populations...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Ernesto Schiffrin
Clinical practice guidelines, which are systematically developed statements aimed at helping people make clinical, policy-related and system-related decisions, frequently vary widely in quality. A strategy is needed to differentiate among guidelines and ensure that those of the highest quality are implemented. Hypertension Canada provides annually updated standardized recommendations and clinical practice guidelines to detect, treat and control hypertension. The annual, evidence-based recommendations are developed through intense discussion of the clinical implications via a systematic review of the literature followed by critical appraisals of all the new clinical research, taking into account the assessment criteria in the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research & Evaluation (AGREE) II instrument that evaluates the process of practice guideline development and the quality of reporting...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Lawrence Appel
With the exception of a few isolated populations, elevated blood pressure is a worldwide pandemic with staggering consequences for individuals, care givers, health care delivery systems, and insurers, including governments. It is well-recognized that the burden of hypertension and its adverse consequences is greater in low- and middle-income countries than economically developed countries. BP-related outcomes also differ by region, with a predominance of stroke in southeast Asian countries and a predominance of ischemic heart disease in the US and Western Europe...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Il Suh
Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a global leading cause of death nowadays. Fortunately, the majority of risk factors which cause CVD are preventable. The INTERSTROKE study recently reported that about 90% of the population-attributable risk of stroke is associated with ten modifiable risk factors. Especially high blood pressure levels are well established to be associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.Recently CVD mortality has been decreasing in high-income countries but increasing in some middle-income countries and low-income countries...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Fernando Stuardo Wyss Quintana
Latin America has 23 countries ranging from Mexico, Central America, South America and the Caribbean, of these 19 countries are considered by the WHO as countries with high and very high risk, one of the similarities of our countries is poor access to services health and medicine, resulting from poor government investment in health as the amount used in this sector occupies only the best 3% of the national budget and gross domestic product.Thus we know that the prevalence of hypertension varies widely from country to country and from city to city, presenting in Guatemala a prevalence of 40%, while in other countries in the area ranges between 25 and 35%, most complicated problem is that within the same country as the population this prevalence can vary greatly and have a different impact between populationsTherefore we know that the impact of cardiovascular disease within the range of non-communicable diseases occupies at least 30% and of these about 70% occupied countries of low and moderate income...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Patricio Lopez-Jaramillo
Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are major causes of death and illness worldwide. In recent decades an increased prevalence of CVD mortality has been reported in low-medium income countries, which has been associated with changes in life styles, deficiencies in health systems and the persistence of social inequities.The metabolic syndrome comprises a cluster of cardiometabolic risk factors, with insulin resistance and increased adiposity as its central features. Identifying individuals with metabolic syndrome is important due to its association with an increased risk of coronary heart disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2)...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Tazeen Jafar
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) defined as reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) or presence of albuminuria, progresses to end stage renal disease (ESRD), needing dialysis or kidney transplant to sustain life, and is associated with increased risks of premature cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality. CKD ranked 18 leading (and most rapidly rising cause of mortality by the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010. The social and economic consequences of CKD are far worse in low and middle income countries (LMICs) including India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Hyeon Chang Kim
Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. Fortunately, cardiovascular mortality has been decreasing in high-income countries, but the rate is still increasing in some middle-income and low-income countries. Even within the Asian region, cardiovascular disease mortality is decreasing in some countries but increasing in others. However, population ageing is common to all Asian countries, and East Asia is among the most aged region in the world. Accordingly, cardiovascular disease prevention in the elderly is becoming more and more important public health issue in East Asia...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Qaisar Raza, Mary Nicolaou, Henriëtte Dijkshoorn, Jacob C Seidell
OBJECTIVE: South Asians living in Western countries have shown higher prevalence of cardiovascular disease and related non-communicable diseases as compared to the local populations. The aim of this study was to compare the general health status and prevalence of myocardial infarction (MI), diabetes, high blood pressure, overweight, obesity, and fruit and vegetable intake between Pakistani immigrants in the Netherlands and local Amsterdam population. DESIGN: A health survey was conducted in 2012-2013 among Pakistanis in the Netherlands...
October 17, 2016: Ethnicity & Health
Amitava Banerjee, Shweta Khandelwal, Lavanya Nambiar, Malvika Saxena, Victoria Peck, Mohammed Moniruzzaman, Jose Rocha Faria Neto, Katherine Curi Quinto, Andrew Smyth, Darryl Leong, José Pablo Werba
BACKGROUND: Secondary prevention is cost-effective for cardiovascular disease (CVD), but uptake is suboptimal. Understanding barriers and facilitators to adherence to secondary prevention for CVD at multiple health system levels may inform policy. OBJECTIVES: To conduct a systematic review of barriers and facilitators to adherence/persistence to secondary CVD prevention medications at health system level. METHODS: Included studies reported effects of health system level factors on adherence/persistence to secondary prevention medications for CVD (coronary artery or cerebrovascular disease)...
2016: Open Heart
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