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Hadil Ak AlOtair, Abdulaziz H Alzeer, Mohammed A Abdou, Shaden O Qasrawi
Central alveolar hypoventilation is rarely encountered. This case report describes a young woman who was recently diagnosed with hypertension and ischemic heart disease. She presented to the emergency room with hypercapnic respiratory failure, for which she was mechanically ventilated. This was preceded by an acute upper respiratory tract infection. She was initially suspected to have Guillain-Barré syndrome, but further investigations ruled out neuromuscular or autoimmune disorders. Sleep-related hypoventilation was suspected after she experienced recurrent apneas at night that resulted in re-intubation...
March 2018: Saudi Medical Journal
Joery P Molenaar, Nicol C Voermans, Lysanne A de Jong, Dick F Stegeman, Jonne Doorduin, Baziel G van Engelen
Impaired muscle relaxation is a feature of many neuromuscular disorders. However, there are few tests available to quantify muscle relaxation. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex can induce muscle relaxation by abruptly inhibiting corticospinal drive. The aim of our study is to investigate if repeatability and reliability of TMS-induced relaxation is greater than voluntary relaxation. Furthermore, effects of sex, cooling and fatigue on muscle relaxation properties were studied. Muscle relaxation of deep finger flexors was assessed in twenty-five healthy subjects (14 M and 11 F, aged 39...
March 15, 2018: Journal of Applied Physiology
Margarita Villar, Lourdes Mateos-Hernandez, Jose de la Fuente
BACKGROUND: Why an autoimmune disease that is the main cause of the acute neuromuscular paralysis worldwide has not yet a well-characterized cause or an effective treatment? The existence of different clinical variants for the Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) coupled with the fact that a high number of pathogens can cause an infection that sometimes, but not always, precedes the development of the syndrome, confers a high degree of uncertainty for both prognosis and treatment. In the post-genomic era, the development of omics technologies for the high-throughput analysis of biological molecules is allowing the characterization of biological systems in a degree of depth unimaginable before...
March 14, 2018: Current Medicinal Chemistry
Sujin Hyung, Kyuhwan Jung, Sung-Rae Cho, Noo Li Jeon
The Schwann cells of the peripheral nervous system are indispensable for the formation, maintenance, and modulation of synapses over the life cycle. They not only recognize neuron-glia signaling molecules, but also secrete gliotransmitters. Through these processes, they regulate neuronal excitability and thus the release of neurotransmitters from the nerve terminal at the neuromuscular junction. Gliotransmitters strongly affect nerve communication, and their secretion is mainly triggered by synchronized Ca2+ signaling, implicating Ca2+ waves in synapse function...
March 15, 2018: Chemphyschem: a European Journal of Chemical Physics and Physical Chemistry
Jeffrey A Allen, Kenneth C Gorson, Deborah Gelinas
Introduction: We explored adherence to the European Federation of Neurological Societies/Peripheral Nerve Society (EFNS/PNS) guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) by reviewing data from a specialty pharmacy database. Materials and Methods: Clinical and electrophysiologic data were reviewed for 65 consecutive patients treated with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) for CIDP. Three neuromuscular neurologists independently classified cases according to EFNS/PNS criteria as (1) fulfilling CIDP criteria; (2) non-CIDP (neither clinical nor electrophysiologic criteria met); or (3) unknown (insufficient information)...
March 2018: Brain and Behavior
Jean K Mah, Jia Feng, Marni B Jacobs, Tina Duong, Kate Carroll, Katy de Valle, Cara L Carty, Lauren P Morgenroth, Michela Guglieri, Monique M Ryan, Paula R Clemens, Mathula Thangarajh, Richard Webster, Edward Smith, Anne M Connolly, Craig M McDonald, Peter Karachunski, Mar Tulinius, Amy Harper, Avital Cnaan, Yi-Wen Chen
OBJECTIVES: To investigate motor function associations with age, sex, and D4Z4 repeats among participants with early-onset facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) type 1 as defined by weakness onset before 10 years of age. METHODS: We collected standardized motor assessments, including manual muscle testing (MMT), quantitative muscle testing, functional motor evaluations, and clinical severity scores (CSSs), at 12 Cooperative International Neuromuscular Research Group centers...
March 14, 2018: Neurology
Gardave S Bhumbra, Marco Beato
Spinal motoneurones (Mns) constitute the final output for the execution of motor tasks. In addition to innervating muscles, Mns project excitatory collateral connections to Renshaw cells (RCs) and other Mns, but the latter have received little attention. We show that Mns receive strong synaptic input from other Mns throughout development and into maturity, with fast-type Mns systematically receiving greater recurrent excitation than slow-type Mns. Optical recordings show that activation of Mns in one spinal segment can propagate to adjacent segments even in the presence of intact recurrent inhibition...
March 2018: PLoS Biology
Young-Jin Moon, Sung-Hoon Kim, Jae-Won Kim, Yoon-Kyung Lee, In-Gu Jun, Gyu-Sam Hwang
Donor safety is the major concern in living donor liver transplantation, although hepatic resection may be associated with postoperative coagulopathy. Recently, the use of sugammadex has been gradually increased, but sugammadex is known to prolong prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT). We compared the postoperative coagulation profiles and outcomes of sugammadex versus pyridostigmine group in donors receiving living donor hepatectomy.Consecutive donor hepatectomy performed between September 2013 and August 2016 was retrospectively analyzed...
March 2018: Medicine (Baltimore)
Genia Dubrovsky, James C Y Dunn
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this review is to briefly summarize the notable structures and pathways in intestinal epithelial growth before presenting the current main areas of active research in intestinal regeneration. As a rapidly advancing field, a number of breakthroughs have recently been made related to the culture of intestinal stem cells (ISCs) and to the engineering of intestinal tissue. RECENT FINDINGS: ISCs can be derived from fibroblasts and can be cultured in hydrogels under xenogeneic-free conditions...
March 13, 2018: Current Opinion in Pediatrics
Gaspar Epro, Andreas Mierau, Christopher McCrum, Michael Leyendecker, Gert-Peter Bruggemann, Kiros Karamanidis
The plantar flexors play a crucial role in recovery from sudden disturbances to gait. The objective of this study was to investigate whether medium (months) or long-term (years) exercise-induced enhancement of triceps surae (TS) neuromuscular capacities affects older adults' ability to retain improvements in reactive gait stability during perturbed walking acquired from perturbation training sessions. Thirty-four female adults (65{plus minus}7y) were recruited to a perturbation training group (n=13) or a group which additionally completed 14 weeks of TS neuromuscular exercise (n=21), 12 of whom continued with the exercise for 1...
March 14, 2018: Journal of Neurophysiology
Guanglin Xing, Moyi Li, Yichen Sun, Menglong Rui, Yan Zhuang, Huihui Lv, Junhai Han, Zhengping Jia, Wei Xie
Neuroligins are postsynaptic adhesion molecules that are essential for postsynaptic specialization and synaptic function. But the underlying molecular mechanisms of Neuroligin functions remain unclear. We found that Drosophila Neuroligin1 (DNlg1) regulates synaptic structure and function through WAVE regulatory complex (WRC)-mediated postsynaptic actin reorganization. The disruption of DNlg1, DNlg2, or their presynaptic partner Neurexin (DNrx) led to a dramatic decrease in the amount of F-actin. Further study showed that DNlg1, but not DNlg2 or DNlg3, directly interacts with the WRC via its C-terminal interacting receptor sequence...
March 14, 2018: ELife
Katherine B Santosa, Alexandra M Keane, Albina Jablonka-Shariff, Bianca Vannucci, Alison K Snyder-Warwick
The terminal Schwann cell (tSC), a type of nonmyelinating Schwann cell, is a significant yet relatively understudied component of the neuromuscular junction. In addition to reviewing the role tSCs play on formation, maintenance, and remodeling of the synapse, we review studies that implicate tSCs in neuromuscular diseases including spinal muscular atrophy, Miller-Fisher syndrome, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, among others. We also discuss the importance of these cells on degeneration and regeneration after nerve injury...
March 13, 2018: Journal of Neuroscience Research
Mariko Nishibe, Yu Katsuyama, Toshihide Yamashita
The motor deficit of the reeler mutants has largely been considered cerebellum related, and the developmental consequences of the cortex on reeler motor behavior have not been examined. We herein showed that there is a behavioral consequence to reeler mutation in models examined at cortex-dependent bimanual tasks that require forepaw dexterity. Using intracortical microstimulation, we found the forelimb representation in the motor cortex was significantly reduced in the reeler. The reeler cortex required a significantly higher current to evoke skeletal muscle movements, suggesting the cortical trans-synaptic propagation is disrupted...
March 13, 2018: Brain Structure & Function
Federico Gennaro, Eling D de Bruin
Assessment of the cortical role during bipedalism has been a methodological challenge. While surface electroencephalography (EEG) is capable of non-invasively measuring cortical activity during human locomotion, it is associated with movement artifacts obscuring cerebral sources of activity. Recently, statistical methods based on blind source separation revealed potential for resolving this issue, by segregating non-cerebral/artifactual from cerebral sources of activity. This step marked a new opportunity for the investigation of the brains' role while moving and was tagged mobile brain/body imaging (MoBI)...
2018: Frontiers in Public Health
Lydia K Caldwell, William H DuPont, Matthew K Beeler, Emily M Post, Emily C Barnhart, Vincent H Hardesty, John P Anders, Emily C Borden, Jeff S Volek, William J Kraemer
The purpose of this double-blind, placebo-controlled investigation was to examine the effects of a Korean Ginseng (GINST15) on measures of perception and physical performance following an acute bout of resistance exercise. Ten women (age: 38.7 ± 7.8 years; height: 1.64 ± 0.05 m; body mass: 76.0 ± 11.6 kg) and nine men (age: 41.2. ± 9.7 years; height: 1.77 ± 0.05 m; body mass: 88.5 ± 5.0 kg) completed the investigation. Participants were randomized to a three-cycle testing scheme consisting of high dose ginseng (HIGH: 960 mg/day), low dose ginseng (LOW: 160 mg/day) and placebo (PBO: 0 mg/day)...
March 2018: Journal of Sports Science & Medicine
Summer B Cook, Brendan R Scott, Katherine L Hayes, Bethany G Murphy
Low-load blood flow restricted (BFR) resistance exercise has been suggested to be as effective as moderate and high-load resistance training for increasing muscle size and strength. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of 6 weeks of HL or low-load BFR resistance training on neuromuscular function, strength, and hypertrophy of the knee extensors. Eighteen participants aged 18-22 years old were randomized to one of three training groups: moderate load (ML: 70% of 1 repetition maximum [1-RM]); BFR (20% 1-RM with a vascular restriction set to ~180 mmHg); and a control group (CON) that did not exercise...
March 2018: Journal of Sports Science & Medicine
Jaelson G Ortiz, Juliano F da Silva, Lorival J Carminatti, Luiz G A Guglielmo, Fernando Diefenthaeler
This study aims to analyze the physiological, neuromuscular, and biochemical responses in untrained women after eight weeks of regular participation in small-sided soccer games compared to aerobic training. Twenty-seven healthy untrained women were divided into two groups [soccer group (SG = 17) and running group (RG = 10)]. Both groups trained three times per week for eight weeks. The variables measured in this study were maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max), relative velocity at VO2 max (vVO2 max), peak velocity, relative intensity at lactate threshold (vLT), relative intensity at onset of blood lactate accumulation (vOBLA), peak force, total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, triglycerides, and cholesterol ratio (LDL/HDL)...
March 2018: Journal of Sports Science & Medicine
Heather Lindstrom, Nigel L Ashworth
INTRODUCTION: This study aims to evaluate the usefulness of electrodiagnostic (EDX) studies in terms of the patient's diagnosis and subsequent management, and to identify patient groups where EDX is particularly useful. METHODS: The records of new patients referred to a single tertiary hospital EDX laboratory during one calendar year were reviewed to determine if EDX studies changed the diagnosis and/or management plan. Logistic regression was used to see if there were any factors that were associated with changed diagnosis or management...
March 13, 2018: Muscle & Nerve
Sha Yan, Pengfei Huang, Ying Wang, Xiongzhi Zeng, Yiya Zhang
Spider venoms are known to contain various toxins that are used as an effective means to capture their prey or to defend themselves against predators. An investigation of the properties of Ornithoctonus huwena (O.huwena) crude venom found that the venom can block neuromuscular transmission of isolated mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm and sciatic nerve-sartorius preparations. However, little is known about its electrophysiological effects on cardiac myocytes. In this study, electrophysiological activities of ventricular myocytes were detected by 100 μg/mL venom of O...
March 13, 2018: Channels
Marco A Minetto, Alberto Botter, Giulia Gamerro, Ilaria Varvello, Giuseppe Massazza, Rosa G Bellomo, Nicola A Maffiuletti, Raoul Saggini
BACKGROUND: The "contralateral effect" phenomenon refers to the strength gain in the opposite, untrained homonymous muscle following unilateral training. Previous studies showed that neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) of the right quadriceps facilitated maximal voluntary strength and efferent neural drive of the left knee extensors, while no previous study investigated the contralateral effect elicited by focal muscle vibration. AIM: To investigate whether quadriceps NMES and focal vibration, when applied unilaterally, have the same potential to enhance the contralateral muscle strength and the associated neural drive...
March 12, 2018: European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
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