Read by QxMD icon Read

oxytocin postpartum depression

Andrea Jobst, Daniela Krause, Carina Maiwald, Kristin Härtl, Aye-Mu Myint, Ralph Kästner, Michael Obermeier, Frank Padberg, Benedikt Brücklmeier, Elif Weidinger, Susann Kieper, Markus Schwarz, Peter Zill, Norbert Müller
During the postpartum period, women are at higher risk of developing a mental disorder such as postpartum depression (PPD), a disorder that associates with mother-infant bonding and child development. Oxytocin is considered to play a key role in mother-infant bonding and social interactions and altered oxytocin plasma concentrations were found to be associated with PPD. In the present study, we evaluated oxytocin plasma levels and depressive symptoms during pregnancy and the postpartum period in healthy women...
August 2016: Archives of Women's Mental Health
C Cardaillac, C Rua, E G Simon, W El-Hage
INTRODUCTION: Postpartum depression (PPD) is prevalent (about 10%) with a major impact on the mother and child health. At the hormonal level, poor regulation of oxytocin rate has a key role in depression. Recently, oxytocin has been used on psychiatric therapy, intranasal or intravenously, particularly in mood disorders. But, in obstetrics, this molecule is administered during childbirth. The objective of this study was to determine if intravenous administration of oxytocin could influence thymic state of the mother in the postpartum period...
June 13, 2016: Journal de Gynécologie, Obstétrique et Biologie de la Reproduction
Diana Moura, Maria Cristina Canavarro, Margarida Figueiredo-Braga
Postpartum depression (PPD) is the most common postnatal psychiatric disorder, and it represents a considerable problem to the health and well-being of women and their families. Several pathogenic mechanisms have been identified in PPD, and recently, oxytocin (OT), known to be involved in childbirth and lactation, has drawn attention as a possible diagnostic and therapeutic tool in this disorder. The aim of this review was to assess and summarize the current literature on the relationship between OT as a potential depressive biomarker and depression in the perinatal period...
August 2016: Archives of Women's Mental Health
Stephen C Gammie, Terri M Driessen, Changjiu Zhao, Michael C Saul, Brian E Eisinger
Changes in expression of hundreds of genes occur during the production and function of the maternal brain that support a wide range of processes. In this review, we synthesize findings from four microarray studies of different maternal brain regions and identify a core group of 700 maternal genes that show significant expression changes across multiple regions. With those maternal genes, we provide new insights into reward-related pathways (maternal bonding), postpartum depression, social behaviors, mental health disorders, and nervous system plasticity/developmental events...
July 2016: Frontiers in Neuroendocrinology
Mary Kimmel, Makena Clive, Fiona Gispen, Jerry Guintivano, Tori Brown, Olivia Cox, Matthias W Beckmann, Johannes Kornhuber, Peter A Fasching, Lauren M Osborne, Elisabeth Binder, Jennifer L Payne, Zachary Kaminsky
The oxytocin receptor (OXTR) is a key regulator of stress and anxiety and may be regulated by both psychosocial risk factors and gonadal hormones, making it an attractive candidate for study in postpartum depression (PPD). The objective of this study was to investigate both serum hormone and PPD specific DNA methylation variation in the OXTR. Illumina HM450 microarray data generated in a prospective PPD cohort identified significant associations (P=0.014) with PPD in an intronic region in the OXTR located 4bp proximal to an estrogen receptor (ER) binding region...
July 2016: Psychoneuroendocrinology
Eva Unternaehrer, Margarete Bolten, Irina Nast, Simon Staehli, Andrea H Meyer, Emma Dempster, Dirk H Hellhammer, Roselind Lieb, Gunther Meinlschmidt
The aim of this study was to investigate whether maternal adversities and cortisol levels during pregnancy predict cord blood DNA methylation of the oxytocin receptor (OXTR). We collected cord blood of 39 babies born to mothers participating in a cross-sectional study (N = 100) conducted in Basel, Switzerland (2007-10). Mothers completed the Inventory of Life Events (second trimester: T2), the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS, third trimester: T3), the Trier Inventory of Chronic Stress (TICS-K, 1-3 weeks postpartum) and provided saliva samples (T2, T3) for maternal cortisol profiles, as computed by the area under the curve with respect to ground (AUCg) or increase (AUCi) for the cortisol awakening response (CAR) and for diurnal cortisol profiles (DAY)...
September 2016: Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience
Sandraluz Lara-Cinisomo, Susan S Girdler, Karen Grewen, Samantha Meltzer-Brody
OBJECTIVE: In this review, we offer a conceptual framework that identifies risk factors of postpartum depression (PPD) in immigrant and U.S.-born Latinas in the United States by focusing on psychosocial and neuroendocrine factors. Although the evidence of the impact psychosocial stressors have on the development of PPD has been well-documented, less is known about the biological etiology of PPD or how these complex stressors jointly increase the risk of PPD in immigrant and U.S.-born Latinas in the United States...
May 2016: Women's Health Issues: Official Publication of the Jacobs Institute of Women's Health
Suena H Massey, Stephanie A Schuette, Hossein Pournajafi-Nazarloo, Katherine L Wisner, C Sue Carter
We examined plasma oxytocin concentration and postpartum depression (PPD) symptom severity in women who were not depressed during pregnancy and whether this differed by major depressive disorder (MDD) history. We assessed psychiatric history and plasma oxytocin in 66 healthy pregnant women in the third trimester (M = 35 ± 3 weeks) and depressive symptoms at 6 weeks postpartum (M = 5.9 ± 0.8 weeks). Linear regression analysis was used to examine oxytocin and PPD symptom severity and moderation of oxytocin and PPD by past MDD...
October 2016: Archives of Women's Mental Health
Erika Comasco, Maria Gulinello, Charlotte Hellgren, Alkistis Skalkidou, Sara Sylven, Inger Sundström-Poromaa
The postpartum period is characterized by a post-withdrawal hormonal status, sleep deprivation, and susceptibility to affective disorders. Postpartum mothering involves automatic and attentional processes to screen out new external as well as internal stimuli. The present study investigated sensorimotor gating in relation to sleep duration, depression, as well as catecholaminergic and oxytocinergic genotypes in postpartum women. Prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the startle reflex and startle reactivity were assessed two months postpartum in 141 healthy and 29 depressed women...
April 2016: European Neuropsychopharmacology: the Journal of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology
Lindsey Garfield, Herbert L Mathews, Linda Witek Janusek
Depression during the perinatal period is common and can have adverse consequences for women and their children. Yet, the biobehavioral mechanisms underlying perinatal depression are not known. Adverse early life experiences increase the risk for adult depression. One potential mechanism by which this increased risk occurs is epigenetic embedding of inflammatory pathways. The purpose of this article is to propose a conceptual model that explicates the linkage between early life adversity and the risk for maternal depression...
May 2016: Biological Research for Nursing
Vivian Gu, Nancy Feeley, Ian Gold, Barbara Hayton, Stephanie Robins, Anna Mackinnon, Simcha Samuel, C Sue Carter, Phyllis Zelkowitz
BACKGROUND: Synthetic oxytocin (synOT) is commonly used in labor management to induce and augment labor, and to prevent postpartum hemorrhage. However, its long-term consequences for maternal health and behavior are largely understudied. We examined the relationship between synOT and maternal oxytocin levels, breastfeeding, and maternal mental health at 2 months postpartum. METHODS: Women were recruited during pregnancy or within 48 hours of giving birth through obstetric practices and hospitals...
March 2016: Birth
Aleeca F Bell, C S Carter, Colin D Steer, Jean Golding, John M Davis, Alana D Steffen, Leah H Rubin, Travis S Lillard, Steven P Gregory, James C Harris, Jessica J Connelly
Postpartum depression (PPD) affects up to 19% of women, negatively impacting maternal and infant health. Reductions in plasma oxytocin levels have been associated with PPD and heritability studies have established a genetic contribution. Epigenetic regulation of the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) has been demonstrated and we hypothesized that individual epigenetic variability at OXTR may impact the development of PPD and that such variability may be central to predicting risk. This case-control study is nested within the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children and included 269 cases with PPD and 276 controls matched on age group, parity, and presence or absence of depressive symptoms in pregnancy as assessed by the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale...
2015: Frontiers in Genetics
Maayan Pratt, Yael Apter-Levi, Adam Vakart, Michal Feldman, Ruth Fishman, Tamar Feldman, Orna Zagoory-Sharon, Ruth Feldman
BACKGROUND: Maternal postpartum depression (PPD) carries long-term detrimental effects on children's well-being, yet the mechanisms of transmission remain unclear. One possible pathway of vulnerability involves the oxytocinergic (OT) system, which is transferred from mother to child via sensitive caregiving and is disrupted in PPD. METHOD: A large birth cohort (N = 1983) of women were repeatedly assessed for depression from birth to 6 years. Utilizing an extreme case design, two matched cohorts were formed; mothers chronically depressed from birth to 6 years and nondepressed controls (N = 97, depressed = 41, nondepressed; N = 56)...
September 2015: Depression and Anxiety
Simcha Samuel, Barbara Hayton, Ian Gold, Nancy Feeley, C Sue Carter, Phyllis Zelkowitz
Mothers with mood or anxiety disorders exhibit less optimal interactive behavior. The neuropeptide oxytocin (OT) has been linked to more optimal interactive behaviors in mothers without mental illness, and it may play a particularly beneficial role in mothers with mood or anxiety disorders given its antidepressant and anxiolytic functions. We compared the relationship between OT and interactive behavior in mothers with and without mental health problems. Participants included 20 women diagnosed with postpartum mood or anxiety disorders (clinical sample) and 90 women with low levels of depression and anxiety during pregnancy and postpartum (community sample)...
July 2015: Infant Mental Health Journal
Christopher A Murgatroyd, Mohammad Taliefar, Steven Bradburn, Lindsay M Carini, Jessica A Babb, Benjamin C Nephew
Depression and anxiety can be severely detrimental to the health of both the affected woman and her offspring. In a rodent model of postpartum depression and anxiety, chronic social stress exposure during lactation induces deficits in maternal care and increases anxiety. Here, we extend previous findings by expanding the behavioral analyses, assessing lactation, and examining several neural systems within amygdalar and hypothalamic regions involved in the control of the stress response and expression of maternal care that may be mediating the behavioral changes in stressed dams...
October 2015: Behavioural Pharmacology
Christopher A Murgatroyd, Catherine J Peña, Giovanni Podda, Eric J Nestler, Benjamin C Nephew
Exposures to various types of early life stress can be robust predictors of the development of psychiatric disorders, including depression and anxiety. The objective of the current study was to investigate the roles of the translationally relevant targets of central vasopressin, oxytocin, ghrelin, orexin, glucocorticoid, and the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) pathway in an early chronic social stress (ECSS) based rodent model of postpartum depression and anxiety. The present study reports novel changes in gene expression and extracellular signal related kinase (ERK) protein levels in the brains of ECSS exposed rat dams that display previously reported depressed maternal care and increased maternal anxiety...
August 2015: Neuropeptides
Ruth Feldman
Sensitive periods (SP) in behavioral development appeared in the biological sciences during the first decade of the 20th century, and research in animal models beginning in the 1950s provide terminology and evidence for SP effects. This paper proposes a rigorous program for human SP research and argues that the complexity of the human brain and variability of the human ecology necessitate that SP effects must be studied in humans, employ longitudinal designs starting at birth, test mechanism-based hypotheses based on animal studies that manipulate early environments, and utilize high-risk conditions as "natural experiments...
May 2015: Development and Psychopathology
Anne Lavoie, Robert J McCarthy, Cynthia A Wong
BACKGROUND: Prophylactic administration of oxytocin as a part of active management of the third stage of labor reduces the risk of postpartum hemorrhage. Prophylactic oxytocin is often administered as an infusion rather than a bolus. The aim of the current up-down sequential allocation dose-response study was to test the hypothesis that parturients who receive intrapartum exogenous oxytocin therapy, and who subsequently undergo cesarean delivery for labor dystocia, will have a higher estimated effective dose in 90% of paturients (ED90) for oxytocin infusion in the third stage of labor compared with nonlaboring parturients...
July 2015: Anesthesia and Analgesia
Simcha Samuel, Barbara Hayton, Ian Gold, Nancy Feeley, C Sue Carter, Phyllis Zelkowitz
PURPOSE: Recent reports indicate that prenatal levels of the neuropeptide oxytocin (OT) are inversely related to depressive symptomatology and positively associated with more optimal interactive behaviors in mothers with high levels of cumulative psychosocial adversity (CPA). In the present pilot study, we aimed to identify factors associated with high versus low levels of OT in pregnant women with high levels of CPA. We hypothesized that insecurely attached women, and those who recently experienced stressful life events (SLE), would have lower levels of prenatal OT...
2015: Attachment & Human Development
E Q Cox, A Stuebe, B Pearson, K Grewen, D Rubinow, S Meltzer-Brody
BACKGROUND: Lactation is thought to buffer stress reactivity via oxytocin (OT). Dysregulation of the HPA axis has been reported in women with postpartum depression (PPD). The co-occurrence of PPD and lactation failure suggests that abnormalities in OT signaling may play a role in PPD. We hypothesized that abnormal OT signaling is implicated in dysregulated HPA axis reactivity among postpartum women with mood symptoms. In a prospective perinatal cohort, we tested associations between OT levels during breastfeeding and stress reactivity...
May 2015: Psychoneuroendocrinology
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"