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nephritis inhibitors pump

Pradeep Arora, Anu Gupta, Mojgan Golzy, Nilang Patel, Randolph L Carter, Kabir Jalal, James W Lohr
BACKGROUND: Acute interstitial nephritis secondary to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) frequently goes undiagnosed due to its subacute clinical presentation, which may later present as chronic kidney disease (CKD). We investigated the association of PPI use with the development of CKD and death. METHODS: Two separate retrospective case-control study designs were employed with a prospective logistic regression analysis of data to evaluate the association of development of CKD and death with PPI use...
August 3, 2016: BMC Nephrology
Anushree C Shirali, Mark A Perazella, Scott Gettinger
Immune checkpoint inhibitors that target the programmed death 1 (PD-1) signaling pathway have recently been approved for use in advanced pretreated non-small cell lung cancer and melanoma. Clinical trial data suggest that these drugs may have adverse effects on the kidney, but these effects have not been well described. We present 6 cases of acute kidney injury in patients with lung cancer who received anti-PD-1 antibodies, with each case displaying evidence of acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) on kidney biopsy...
August 2016: American Journal of Kidney Diseases: the Official Journal of the National Kidney Foundation
Yen-Chun Peng, Cheng-Li Lin, Hong-Zen Yeh, Chi-Sen Chang, Yu-Lin Wu, Chia-Hung Kao
Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) use may be associated with nephritis and acute renal injury. The risk of PPIs and deterioration of renal function, in patients with renal diseases, needs to be investigated. A case-control study was conducted in a nation-wide data setting from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). This case-control study used data extracted from NHIRD between the years 2006 and 2011. We used propensity scores to match 3808 patients suffering from renal diseases (ICD-9-CM codes 580-589), with patients (aged ≥20 years) who had had a recent diagnosis of end-stage renal diseases (ESRDs) and had undertaken renal replacement therapy during the period of 2006 to 2011...
April 2016: Medicine (Baltimore)
Yan Xie, Benjamin Bowe, Tingting Li, Hong Xian, Sumitra Balasubramanian, Ziyad Al-Aly
The association between proton pump inhibitors (PPI) use and risk of acute interstitial nephritis has been described. However, whether exposure to PPI associates with incident CKD, CKD progression, or ESRD is not known. We used Department of Veterans Affairs national databases to build a primary cohort of new users of PPI (n=173,321) and new users of histamine H2-receptor antagonists (H2 blockers; n=20,270) and followed these patients over 5 years to ascertain renal outcomes. In adjusted Cox survival models, the PPI group, compared with the H2 blockers group, had an increased risk of incident eGFR<60 ml/min per 1...
October 2016: Journal of the American Society of Nephrology: JASN
Dennis G Moledina, Mark A Perazella
Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are commonly prescribed and available over-the-counter, and are taken by millions of patients around the world, often for many months to years. While PPIs have an excellent overall safety profile, concerns have been raised about adverse renal events, specifically their association with acute interstitial nephritis (AIN). While only a small proportion of patients develop AIN from PPIs, these drugs are now a common cause of drug-induced AIN in the developed world due to their widespread and prolonged use...
October 2016: Journal of Nephrology
Christina M Wyatt
Proton pump inhibitors are widely used worldwide for the management of gastroesophageal reflux, but have been associated with the development of interstitial nephritis and acute kidney injury. A large observational study using data from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities cohort and the Geisinger Health System demonstrates an association between the use of proton pump inhibitors and chronic kidney disease. Although the study does not prove causality, the robustness of the findings in two cohorts suggests a need for further study and reevaluation of the safety of these agents for widespread, non-prescription use...
April 2016: Kidney International
David Ruiz-Clavijo García, Alba Zúñiga Ripa, Belen González de la Higuera Carnicer, Eduardo Valdivielso Cortazar, Federico Bolado Concejo, Jesús Urman Fernández, Juan Jose Vila Costas
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2, 2016: Gastroenterología y Hepatología
Frederick J A Torlot, Duncan J Whitehead
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2016: British Journal of Hospital Medicine
Benjamin Lazarus, Yuan Chen, Francis P Wilson, Yingying Sang, Alex R Chang, Josef Coresh, Morgan E Grams
IMPORTANCE: Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are among the most commonly used drugs worldwide and have been linked to acute interstitial nephritis. Less is known about the association between PPI use and chronic kidney disease (CKD). OBJECTIVE: To quantify the association between PPI use and incident CKD in a population-based cohort. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: In total, 10,482 participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of at least 60 mL/min/1...
February 2016: JAMA Internal Medicine
Ashley E Woodruff, Calvin J Meaney, Elizabeth A Hansen, Gina M Prescott
Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) is a form of acute kidney injury (AKI) characterized by a rapid deterioration of renal function, inflammatory infiltration of interstitial tissues, and renal edema. Drug-induced AIN is the most common etiology of AIN, but AIN can also have infectious, autoimmune, or idiopathic causes. β-Lactam antibacterials, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, and proton pump inhibitors are recognized as leading causes of AIN; however, many other drugs have been identified as causes. We describe the case of a 59-year-old white male who developed AIN that required hemodialysis following azithromycin treatment...
November 2015: Pharmacotherapy
O Reinberg
Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are among the most widely prescribed medications worldwide and their use is increasing. Their efficiency has been proven and the short term tolerance is good with few reversible side effects. However concerns about possible long term side effects continue to arise. This article reviews proven and potential side effects associated with PPI especially on the long term use.
September 9, 2015: Revue Médicale Suisse
Tony Antoniou, Erin M Macdonald, Simon Hollands, Tara Gomes, Muhammad M Mamdani, Amit X Garg, J Michael Paterson, David N Juurlink
BACKGROUND: Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) cause interstitial nephritis and are an underappreciated cause of acute kidney injury. We examined the risk of acute kidney injury and acute interstitial nephritis in a large population of older patients receiving PPIs. METHODS: We conducted a population-based study involving Ontario residents aged 66 years and older who initiated PPI therapy between Apr. 1, 2002, and Nov. 30, 2011. We used propensity score matching to establish a highly comparable reference group of control patients...
April 2015: CMAJ Open
P Korsten, G A Müller
Interstitial nephritis is responsible for about 12 % of end-stage renal disease in Germany. It comprises an etiologically heterogenous group of inflammatory renal disorders which primarily affect the renal interstitium and tubuli. Drugs, predominantly antibiotics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and proton pump inhibitors are causative in the majority of cases. Rheumatic diseases frequently affect the kidneys, either the glomeruli or the interstitial tissues. Inflammatory interstitial processes can be accompanied by complex functional tubular disorders...
May 2015: Zeitschrift Für Rheumatologie
Montserrat Garcia, Ramón Saracho, Nekane Jaio, Kalliopi Vrotsoukanari, Carmelo Aguirre
Drugs are a frequent cause of acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (ATIN). Antibiotics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and recently proton pump inhibitors stand among the most commonly responsible ones. However, their respective responsibility is not well known. This study reports 33 cases of drug-induced ATIN (DI-ATIN), the most frequent ones being metamizole and omeprazole. Clinicians often fail to diagnose DI-ATIN because its signs and symptoms are non-specific and differ from the now classic form observed with methicillin...
December 2010: NDT Plus
A Valluri, L Hetherington, E Mcquarrie, S Fleming, D Kipgen, C C Geddes, B Mackinnon, S Bell
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (ATIN) is a potentially reversible cause of acute kidney injury with the majority of cases drug related. Our aims were to examine the incidence profile of patients with ATIN in Scotland and to assess the impact of corticosteroid treatment. DESIGN AND METHODS: All adult patients with biopsy-proven ATIN, diagnosed between 2000 and 2012, presenting to renal units serving 1.9 of Scotland's 5 million population were included...
July 2015: QJM: Monthly Journal of the Association of Physicians
Manuel Praga, Angel Sevillano, Pilar Auñón, Ester González
Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) is an important cause of acute kidney injury that has experienced significant epidemiological and clinical changes in the last years. The classical presentation, mostly induced by antibiotics and accompanied by evident hypersensitivity manifestations (skin rash, eosinophilia, fever) has been largely replaced by oligosymptomatic presentations that require a higher index of suspicion and are increasingly recognized in the elderly, having non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents and proton pump inhibitors as frequent offending drugs...
September 2015: Nephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation
Quaid Nadri, Mohammed Mahdi Althaf
Drug-induced interstitial nephritis is a common cause of acute kidney injury indicated by elevated serum creatinine. We report a case of omeprazole-induced acute granulomatous interstitial nephritis (GIN). Our patient developed acute GIN secondary to omeprazole ingestion requiring haemodialysis. Treatment with steroids and withdrawal of omperazole was successful allowing the patient to discontinue haemodialysis in 3 months. She remains dialysis free with chronic kidney disease stage IV, reflected by a serum creatine of 191 μmol/L and estimated glomerular filtration rate of 23 mL/min/1...
2014: BMJ Case Reports
Cyril Leven, Laurent Hudier, Sylvie Picard, Hélène Longuet, Nolwenn Lorcy, Gérard Cam, Zakaria Boukerroucha, Thibault Dolley-Hitze, Philippe Le Cacheux, Jean-Michel Halimi, Emilie Cornec Le Gall, Catherine Hanrotel-Saliou, Audrey Arreule, Michel Massad, Agnès Duveau, Grégoire Couvrat-Desvergnes, Eric Renaudineau
OBJECTIVE: Certain medications have been associated with drug-induced acute interstitial nephritis (AIN), but few prospective studies have been published. This prospective observational study aims to record and assess incidents of drug-induced AIN observed over a period of one year in nephrology units in France. The goal is to determine which medications are involved in AIN and to expound the clinical and biological presentation, management, and evolution of AIN. METHODS: Between April 2012 and April 2013, drug-associated cases of AIN were prospectively recorded in 24 patients registered in 11 nephrology units that belong to the Société de Néphrologie de l'Ouest (SNO)...
November 2014: La Presse Médicale
Angela K Muriithi, Nelson Leung, Anthony M Valeri, Lynn D Cornell, Sanjeev Sethi, Mary E Fidler, Samih H Nasr
Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) is an important cause of acute kidney injury (AKI), and its prevalence in the elderly may be increasing. It is largely unknown whether AIN in the elderly is similar to that in younger adults; therefore, we investigated the causes and characteristics of AIN in 45 elderly patients (65 years and older) and in 88 younger adults (18-64 years old). Compared with younger patients, the elderly had significantly more drug-induced AIN (87 vs. 64%), proton pump inhibitor-induced AIN (18 vs...
February 2015: Kidney International
Angela K Muriithi, Nelson Leung, Anthony M Valeri, Lynn D Cornell, Sanjeev Sethi, Mary E Fidler, Samih H Nasr
BACKGROUND: Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) is an important cause of acute kidney injury, especially in hospitalized patients. The cause and outcome of AIN, particularly that due to drugs, is changing with prevalent medication use. The effectiveness of steroids for treatment of AIN is debated. STUDY DESIGN: Case series. SETTING & PARTICIPANTS: 133 patients with biopsy-proven AIN from 1993 through 2011 at a single center. OUTCOMES: Recovery of kidney function by 6 months, either complete, partial, or none...
October 2014: American Journal of Kidney Diseases: the Official Journal of the National Kidney Foundation
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