Read by QxMD icon Read

Disclosure of medical errors , patient perception

M Chaneliere, F Jacquet, P Occelli, S Touzet, V Siranyan, C Colin
BACKGROUND: The assessment of patient safety culture refers mainly to surveys exploring the perceptions of health professionals in hospitals. These surveys have less relevance when considering the assessment of the patient safety culture of medical students, especially at university or medical school. They are indeed not fully integrated in care units and constitute a heterogeneous population. This work aimed to find appropriate assessment tools of the patient safety culture of medical students...
September 29, 2016: BMC Medical Education
Minsu Ock, Hyun Joo Kim, Min-Woo Jo, Sang-Il Lee
BACKGROUND: Experience with open disclosure and its study are restricted to certain western countries. In addition, there are concerns that open disclosure may be less suitable in non-western countries. The present study explored and compared the in-depth perceptions of the general public and physicians regarding open disclosure in Korea. METHODS: We applied the COREQ (Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research) checklist to this qualitative study...
2016: BMC Medical Ethics
Kathleen Mazor, Douglas W Roblin, Sarah M Greene, Hassan Fouayzi, Thomas H Gallagher
BACKGROUND: Full disclosure of harmful errors to patients, including a statement of regret, an explanation, acceptance of responsibility and commitment to prevent recurrences is the current standard for physicians in the USA. OBJECTIVE: To examine the extent to which primary care physicians' perceptions of event-level, physician-level and organisation-level factors influence intent to disclose a medical error in challenging situations. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey containing two hypothetical vignettes: (1) delayed diagnosis of breast cancer, and (2) care coordination breakdown causing a delayed response to patient symptoms...
October 2016: BMJ Quality & Safety
Sherine Salib, Elizabeth M Glowacki, Lindsay A Chilek, Michael Mackert
OBJECTIVES: Learning effective communication is essential for physicians. Effective communication has been shown to affect healthcare outcomes, including patient safety, adherence rates, patient satisfaction, and enhanced teamwork. The importance of these skills has become even more apparent in recent years, with value-based purchasing programs and federal measures of patient satisfaction in the form of Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems scores becoming an important part of measuring the performance of a healthcare facility...
June 2015: Southern Medical Journal
Mark I K Norrish
OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to provide insight into the preferences for and perceptions of medical error disclosure (MED) by members of the public in Oman. METHODS: Between January and June 2012, an online survey was used to collect responses from 205 members of the public across five governorates of Oman. RESULTS: A disclosure gap was revealed between the respondents' preferences for MED and perceived current MED practices in Oman. This disclosure gap extended to both the type of error and the person most likely to disclose the error...
May 2015: Sultan Qaboos University Medical Journal
Steven E Raper, Andrew S Resnick, Jon B Morris
OBJECTIVES: Surgery residents are expected to demonstrate the ability to communicate with patients, families, and the public in a wide array of settings on a wide variety of issues. One important setting in which residents may be required to communicate with patients is in the disclosure of medical error. This article details one approach to developing a course in the disclosure of medical errors by residents. DESIGN: Before the development of this course, residents had no education in the skills necessary to disclose medical errors to patients...
November 2014: Journal of Surgical Education
Carolyn D Prouty, Mary Beth Foglia, Thomas H Gallagher
BACKGROUND: Hospitals face a disclosure dilemma when large-scale adverse events affect multiple patients and the chance of harm is extremely low. Understanding the perspectives of patients who have received disclosures following such events could help institutions develop communication plans that are commensurate with the perceived or real harm and scale of the event. METHODS: A mailed survey was conducted in 2008 of 266 University of Washington Medical Center (UWMC) patients who received written disclosure in 2004 about a large-scale, low-harm/low-risk adverse event involving an incomplete endoscope cleaning process...
2013: Journal of Clinical Ethics
Joshua M Liao, Jason M Etchegaray, S Tyler Williams, David H Berger, Sigall K Bell, Eric J Thomas
PURPOSE: To develop and test the psychometric properties of a survey to measure students' perceptions about patient safety as observed on clinical rotations. METHOD: In 2012, the authors surveyed 367 graduating fourth-year medical students at three U.S. MD-granting medical schools. They assessed the survey's reliability and construct and concurrent validity. They examined correlations between students' perceptions of organizational cultural factors, organizational patient safety measures, and students' intended safety behaviors...
February 2014: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
Annegret F Hannawa
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to test causal effects of physicians' nonverbal involvement on medical error disclosure outcomes. METHODS: 216 hospital outpatients were randomly assigned to two experimental treatment groups. The first group watched a video vignette of a verbally effective and nonverbally involved error disclosure. The second group was exposed to a verbally effective but nonverbally uninvolved error disclosure. All patients responded to seven outcome measures...
March 2014: Patient Education and Counseling
B A Ushie, K K Salami, A S Jegede, M Oyetunde
BACKGROUND: Human errors in healthcare delivery pose serious threats to patients undergoing treatment. While clinical concern is growing in response, there is need to report social and behavioural context of the problem in Nigeria. OBJECTIVE: To examine patients' knowledge and perceived reactions to medical errors. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted using a semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect data from 269 in-patients and 10 In-Depth Interviews were conducted among health caregivers in the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Nigeria...
September 2013: African Health Sciences
Angus J F Finlay, Cameron L Stewart, Malcolm Parker
Open disclosure (OD) after adverse health care events is the subject of a national standard that has been implemented in state health policy documents, and is included in the Medical Board of Australia's code of conduct for doctors. Nevertheless, doctors have been slow to embrace the practice of OD. There is a strong ethical case for implementing OD in the primary interests of patients, and additionally from a medicolegal risk management point of view. There are no statutory requirements in relation to OD, but common law judgments have imposed a duty of OD in tort and contract...
May 6, 2013: Medical Journal of Australia
Qiongwen Zhang, Yulin Li, Jing Li, Xuanyue Mao, Lijuan Zhang, Qinghua Ying, Xin Wei, Lili Shang, Mingming Zhang
OBJECTIVES: To investigate the baseline status of patients' awareness, knowledge, and attitudes to patient safety in China, and to determine the factors that influence patients' involvement in patient safety. METHODS: We conducted a cross sectional survey using questionnaires adapted from recent studies on patient safety from outside China. The items included medical errors, infection, medication safety, and other aspects of patient safety. The questionnaire included 17 items and 5 domains...
February 2012: Journal of Evidence-based Medicine
S M Sherman, E Moss, C W E Redman
An audit of the screening history of all new cervical cancer cases has been a requirement since April 2007. While NHS cervical screening programmes (NHSCSP) guidance requires that women diagnosed with cervical cancer are offered the findings of the audit, as yet there has been no research to investigate the psychological impact that meeting to discuss the findings might have on patients. This is in spite of the fact that cytological under-call may play a role in as many as 20% of cervical cancer cases. This review draws on the literature concerning breaking bad news, discussing cancer and disclosing medical errors, in order to gain insight into both the negative and positive consequences that may accompany a cervical screening review meeting...
April 2013: Cytopathology: Official Journal of the British Society for Clinical Cytology
Eitan Naveh, Tal Katz-Navon
BACKGROUND: To avoid errors and improve patient safety and quality of care, health care organizations need to identify the sources of failures and facilitate implementation of corrective actions. Hence, health care organizations try to collect reports and data about errors by investing enormous resources in reporting systems. However, despite health care organizations' declared goal of increasing the voluntary reporting of errors and although the Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005 (S...
January 2014: Health Care Management Review
A M Mohamed, M A Ghanem, A Kassem
This cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the knowledge, perceptions and practices towards medical ethics of physician residents at university hospitals in Alexandria, Egypt. A self-administered structured questionnaire was used for knowledge and perceptions and a checklist for observations of doctor-patient interactions in the outpatient setting. Only 18.0% ofthe 128 participating residents had obtained their knowledge from their medical education and 29.9% were dissatisfied with the roles played by the ethics committee...
September 2012: Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal, la Revue de Santé de la Méditerranée Orientale
Amy K Schneider, Kristin J Brinsley-Rainisch, Melissa K Schaefer, Traci Camilli, Joseph F Perz, Ronda L Cochran
BACKGROUND: Unsafe injection practices in health-care settings often result in notification of potentially affected patients, to disclose the error and recommend blood-borne pathogens testing. Few studies have assessed public perceptions and preferences for patient notification. METHODS: Six focus groups were conducted during Fall 2009, with residents of Atlanta, GA, and New York City, NY. Questions focused on preferences for receiving health information, knowledge of safe injection practices, and responses to and preferences for a patient notification letter...
March 2013: Journal of Patient Safety
Xiuzhu Gu, Kenji Itoh
OBJECTIVES: To explore Chinese patients' views on physician disclosure actions after an adverse event and their acceptance of different types of apologies from the physician who caused the event. METHODS: A questionnaire survey was conducted in 2009, collecting 934 valid responses (52% response rate) from inpatients and families in 3 Chinese hospitals. Respondents' views on and attitudes toward physician actions after a medical error were elicited as responses to 2 fictitious adverse events (vignettes) with different levels of outcome severity...
December 2012: Journal of Patient Safety
Andrea C Kronman, Michael Paasche-Orlow, Jay D Orlander
PURPOSE: Attributes of the organisational culture of residency training programmes may impact patient safety. Training environments are complex, composed of clinical teams, residency programmes, and clinical units. We examined the relationship between residents' perceptions of their training environment and disclosure of or apology for their worst error. METHOD: Anonymous, self-administered surveys were distributed to Medicine and Surgery residents at Boston Medical Center in 2005...
April 2012: BMJ Quality & Safety
Laura M Wagner, Kimberley Harkness, Philip C Hébert, Thomas H Gallagher
Nurses have an obligation to disclose an error when one occurs. This study explored 1180 nurses' perceptions of error disclosure in the nursing home setting. Nurse respondents found disclosure to be a difficult process. Registered nurse respondents and nurses who had prior experience disclosing a serious error were more likely to disclose a serious error. The study has implications to improve nursing education, policy, and patient safety culture in the nursing home setting.
January 2012: Journal of Nursing Care Quality
Rick Iedema, Suellen Allen, Kate Britton, Donella Piper, Andrew Baker, Carol Grbich, Alfred Allan, Liz Jones, Anthony Tuckett, Allison Williams, Elizabeth Manias, Thomas H Gallagher
OBJECTIVES: To investigate patients' and family members' perceptions and experiences of disclosure of healthcare incidents and to derive principles of effective disclosure. DESIGN: Retrospective qualitative study based on 100 semi-structured, in depth interviews with patients and family members. SETTING: Nationwide multisite survey across Australia. PARTICIPANTS: 39 patients and 80 family members who were involved in high severity healthcare incidents (leading to death, permanent disability, or long term harm) and incident disclosure...
2011: BMJ: British Medical Journal
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"