keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

pyrazinamide AND pharmacokinetics

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29133558/pharmacokinetics-and-drug-drug-interactions-of-lopinavir-ritonavir-administered-with-first-and-second-line-antituberculosis-drugs-in-hiv-infected-children-treated-for-multidrug-resistant-tuberculosis
#1
Louvina E van der Laan, Anthony J Garcia-Prats, H Simon Schaaf, Tjokosela Tikiso, Lubbe Wiesner, Mine de Kock, Jana Winckler, Jennifer Norman, Helen McIlleron, Paolo Denti, Anneke C Hesseling
Background Lopinavir/ritonavir forms the backbone of current first-line antiretroviral regimens in young HIV-infected children. As multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB) frequently occurs in young children in high-burden TB settings, it is important to identify potential interactions between MDR-TB treatment and lopinavir/ritonavir. We describe the pharmacokinetics of and potential drug-drug interactions between lopinavir/ritonavir and routine drugs used for MDR-TB treatment in HIV-infected children.Methods A combined population pharmacokinetic model was developed to jointly describe the pharmacokinetics of lopinavir and ritonavir in 32 HIV-infected children (16 on MDR-TB treatment with combinations of high-dose isoniazid, pyrazinamide, ethambutol, ethionamide, terizidone, a fluoroquinolone, and amikacin: and 16 without TB), who were established on a lopinavir/ritonavir-containing antiretroviral regimen...
November 13, 2017: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29120971/a-systematic-review-of-salivary-versus-blood-concentrations-of-anti-tuberculosis-drugs-and-their-potential-for-salivary-therapeutic-drug-monitoring
#2
Simone H J van den Elsen, Lisette M Oostenbrink, Scott K Heysell, Daiki Hira, Daan J Touw, Onno W Akkerman, Mathieu S Bolhuis, Jan-Willem C Alffenaar
BACKGROUND: Therapeutic drug monitoring is useful in the treatment of tuberculosis to assure adequate exposure, minimize antibiotic resistance, and reduce toxicity. Salivary therapeutic drug monitoring could reduce the risks, burden, and costs of blood-based therapeutic drug monitoring. This systematic review compared human pharmacokinetics of anti-tuberculosis drugs in saliva and blood to determine if salivary therapeutic drug monitoring could be a promising alternative. METHODS: On December 2, 2016, PubMed and the Institute for Scientific Information Web of Knowledge were searched for pharmacokinetic studies reporting human salivary and blood concentrations of anti-tuberculosis drugs...
November 8, 2017: Therapeutic Drug Monitoring
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29095954/pyrazinamide-clearance-is-impaired-among-hiv-tuberculosis-patients-with-high-levels-of-systemic-immune-activation
#3
Christopher Vinnard, Shruthi Ravimohan, Neo Tamuhla, Jotam Pasipanodya, Shashikant Srivastava, Chawangwa Modongo, Nicola M Zetola, Drew Weissman, Tawanda Gumbo, Gregory P Bisson
Pyrazinamide is the main driver of sterilizing effect in the standard regimen in adults and older children, and this effect is concentration-dependent. Tuberculosis patients co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have an increased risk for poor tuberculosis treatment outcomes and adverse drug events. We sought to determine whether measures of systemic immune activation were related to pyrazinamide pharmacokinetics among HIV/tuberculosis patients. We conducted a prospective cohort study of pyrazinamide pharmacokinetics in HIV/tuberculosis patients in Gaborone, Botswana...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29032112/dermal-pharmacokinetics-of-pyrazinamide-determined-by-microdialysis-sampling-in-rats
#4
Nivea M F Voelkner, Alexander Voelkner, Juliana Costa, Sherwin K B Sy, Juliane Hermes, Johanna Weitzel, Sebastian Morales, Hartmut Derendorf
Studies have demonstrated pyrazinamide's efficacy against stages of the parasite which causes cutaneous leishmaniasis. Although pyrazinamide is widely distributed to most fluids and tissues, the drug distribution that reaches the skin is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate pyrazinamide pharmacokinetics in rat dermal tissue by dermal microdialysis. Skin pharmacokinetics were assessed by implanting a linear microdialysis probe in the dermis of ten rats. Additionally, blood samples were collected for assessing plasma pharmacokinetics...
October 12, 2017: International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28895161/therapeutic-drug-monitoring-of-antitubercular-agents-for-disseminated-mycobacterium-tuberculosis-during-intermittent-haemodialysis-and-continuous-venovenous-haemofiltration
#5
J H Sin, R H Elshaboury, R M Hurtado, A R Letourneau, R G Gandhi
WHAT IS KNOWN AND OBJECTIVE: There is a lack of data regarding therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of antitubercular agents in the setting of continuous venovenous haemofiltration (CVVH). We describe TDM results of numerous antitubercular agents in a critically ill patient during CVVH and haemodialysis. CASE SUMMARY: A 49-year-old man was initiated on treatment for disseminated Mycobacterium tuberculosis. During hospital admission, the patient developed critical illness and required renal replacement therapy...
September 11, 2017: Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28862186/food-significantly-reduces-plasma-concentrations-of-first-line-anti-tuberculosis-drugs
#6
Agibothu Kupparam Hemanth Kumar, Vedachalam Chandrasekaran, Angadi Kiran Kumar, M Kawaskar, J Lavanya, Soumya Swaminathan, Geetha Ramachandran
BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES: Concomitant feeding and anti-tuberculosis (TB) drug administration are likely to reduce nausea and enhance compliance to treatment. However, food could lower plasma drug concentrations. This study was undertaken to examine the effect of food on two-hour plasma concentrations of rifampicin (RMP), isoniazid (INH) and pyrazinamide (PZA), and pharmacokinetics of these drugs in adult TB patients. METHODS: Newly diagnosed adult TB patients were recruited from the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP) treatment centres in Chennai Corporation, Chennai, India...
April 2017: Indian Journal of Medical Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28827417/pharmacokinetics-tolerability-and-bacteriological-response-of-rifampin-administered-at-600-900-and-1-200-milligrams-daily-in-patients-with-pulmonary-tuberculosis
#7
R E Aarnoutse, G S Kibiki, K Reither, H H Semvua, F Haraka, C M Mtabho, S G Mpagama, J van den Boogaard, I M Sumari-de Boer, C Magis-Escurra, M Wattenberg, J G M Logger, L H M Te Brake, M Hoelscher, S H Gillespie, A Colbers, P P J Phillips, G Plemper van Balen, M J Boeree
In a multiple-dose-ranging trial, we previously evaluated higher doses of rifampin in patients for 2 weeks. The objectives of the current study were to administer higher doses of rifampin for a longer period to compare the pharmacokinetics, safety/tolerability, and bacteriological activity of such regimens. In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, phase II clinical trial, 150 Tanzanian patients with tuberculosis (TB) were randomized to receive either 600 mg (approximately 10 mg/kg of body weight), 900 mg, or 1,200 mg rifampin combined with standard doses of isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol administered daily for 2 months...
November 2017: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28741299/a-review-of-moxifloxacin-for-the-treatment-of-drug-susceptible-tuberculosis
#8
REVIEW
Anushka Naidoo, Kogieleum Naidoo, Helen McIlleron, Sabiha Essack, Nesri Padayatchi
Moxifloxacin, an 8-methoxy quinolone, is an important drug in the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and is being investigated in novel drug regimens with pretomanid, bedaquiline, and pyrazinamide, or rifapentine, for the treatment of drug-susceptible tuberculosis. Early results of these studies are promising. Although current evidence does not support the use of moxifloxacin in treatment-shortening regimens for drug-susceptible tuberculosis, it may be recommended in patients unable to tolerate standard first-line drug regimens or for isoniazid monoresistance...
November 2017: Journal of Clinical Pharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28719501/evaluation-of-the-adequacy-of-the-2010-revised-world-health-organization-recommended-dosages-of-the-first-line-antituberculosis-drugs-for-children
#9
Hongmei Yang, Anthony Enimil, Fizza S Gillani, Sampson Antwi, Albert Dompreh, Antoinette Ortsin, Eugene Adu Awhireng, Maxwell Owusu, Lubbe Wiesner, Charles A Peloquin, Awewura Kwara
BACKGROUND: The World Health Organization recommended increased dosages of the first-line antituberculosis (anti-TB) drugs for children in 2010. We examined the frequency of and factors associated with low plasma maximum concentration (Cmax) of each drug in children treated with the revised dosages. METHODS: Children on anti-TB therapy for at least 4 weeks underwent pharmacokinetic testing. Plasma Cmax below the lower limit of proposed reference range was considered low...
July 14, 2017: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28657202/assessing-pharmacodynamic-interactions-in-mice-using-the-multistate-tuberculosis-pharmacometric-and-general-pharmacodynamic-interaction-models
#10
Chunli Chen, Sebastian G Wicha, Gerjo J de Knegt, Fatima Ortega, Laura Alameda, Veronica Sousa, Jurriaan E M de Steenwinkel, Ulrika S H Simonsson
The aim of this study was to investigate pharmacodynamic interactions in mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis using population pharmacokinetics, the Multistate Tuberculosis Pharmacometric (MTP) model, and the General Pharmacodynamic Interaction (GPDI) model. Rifampicin, isoniazid, ethambutol or pyrazinamide were administered in monotherapy for 4 weeks. Rifampicin and isoniazid showed effects in monotherapy, whereas the animals became moribund after 7 days with ethambutol or pyrazinamide alone. No pharmacodynamic interactions were observed against fast-multiplying bacteria...
June 28, 2017: CPT: Pharmacometrics & Systems Pharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28653479/a-population-pharmacokinetic-model-incorporating-saturable-pharmacokinetics-and-autoinduction-for-high-rifampicin-doses
#11
Robin J Svensson, Rob E Aarnoutse, Andreas H Diacon, Rodney Dawson, Stephen H Gillespie, Martin J Boeree, Ulrika S H Simonsson
Accumulating evidence suggests that increasing doses of rifampicin may shorten tuberculosis treatment. The PanACEA HIGHRIF1 trial assessed safety, pharmacokinetics, and antimycobacterial activity of rifampicin at doses up to 40 mg/kg. Eighty-three pulmonary tuberculosis patients received 10, 20, 25, 30, 35, or 40 mg/kg rifampicin daily over 2 weeks, supplemented with standard doses of isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol in the second week. This study aimed at characterizing rifampicin pharmacokinetics observed in HIGHRIF1 using nonlinear mixed effects modeling...
June 27, 2017: Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28607022/pharmacokinetics-of-pyrazinamide-and-optimal-dosing-regimens-for-drug-sensitive-and-resistant-tuberculosis
#12
Maxwell T Chirehwa, Helen McIlleron, Roxana Rustomjee, Thuli Mthiyane, Philip Onyebujoh, Peter Smith, Paolo Denti
Pyrazinamide is used in the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) because its sterilizing effect against tubercle bacilli allows the shortening of treatment. It is part of standard treatment for drug-susceptible and drug-resistant TB, and it is being considered as a companion drug in novel regimens. The aim of this analysis was to characterize factors contributing to the variability in exposure and to evaluate drug exposures using alternative doses, thus providing evidence to support revised dosing recommendations for drug-susceptible and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB)...
August 2017: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28506804/chloroquine-enhances-the-antimycobacterial-activity-of-isoniazid-and-pyrazinamide-by-reversing-inflammation-induced-macrophage-efflux
#13
U Matt, P Selchow, M Dal Molin, S Strommer, O Sharif, K Schilcher, F Andreoni, A Stenzinger, A S Zinkernagel, M Zeitlinger, P Sander, J Nemeth
Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is notorious for persisting within host macrophages. Efflux pumps decrease intracellular drug levels, thus fostering persistence of MTB during therapy. Isoniazid (INH) and pyrazinamide (PZA) are substrates of the efflux pump breast cancer resistance protein-1 (BCRP-1), which is inhibited by chloroquine (CQ). In this study, BCRP-1 was found to be expressed on macrophages of human origin and on foamy giant cells at the site of MTB infection. In the current in vitro study, interferon-gamma (IFNγ) increased the expression of BCRP-1 in macrophages derived from the human monocytic leukaemia cell line THP-1...
July 2017: International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28289033/population-pharmacokinetics-of-pyrazinamide-in-patients-with-tuberculosis
#14
Abdullah Alsultan, Rada Savic, Kelly E Dooley, Marc Weiner, William Whitworth, William R Mac Kenzie, Charles A Peloquin
The current treatment used for tuberculosis (TB) is lengthy and needs to be shortened and improved. Pyrazinamide (PZA) has potent sterilizing activity and has the potential to shorten the TB treatment duration, if treatment is optimized. The goals of this study were (i) to develop a population pharmacokinetic (PK) model for PZA among patients enrolled in PK substudies of Tuberculosis Trial Consortium (TBTC) trials 27 and 28 and (ii) to determine covariates that affect PZA PK. (iii) We also performed simulations and target attainment analysis using the proposed targets of a maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of >35 μg/ml or an area under the concentration-versus-time curve (AUC) of >363 μg · h/ml to see if higher weight-based dosing could improve PZA efficacy...
June 2017: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28174307/a-bioengineered-three-dimensional-cell-culture-platform-integrated-with-microfluidics-to-address-antimicrobial-resistance-in-tuberculosis
#15
Magdalena K Bielecka, Liku B Tezera, Robert Zmijan, Francis Drobniewski, Xunli Zhang, Suwan Jayasinghe, Paul Elkington
Antimicrobial resistance presents one of the most significant threats to human health, with the emergence of totally drug-resistant organisms. We have combined bioengineering, genetically modified bacteria, longitudinal readouts, and fluidics to develop a transformative platform to address the drug development bottleneck, utilizing Mycobacterium tuberculosis as the model organism. We generated microspheres incorporating virulent reporter bacilli, primary human cells, and an extracellular matrix by using bioelectrospray methodology...
February 7, 2017: MBio
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28160272/suboptimal-exposure-to-anti-tb-drugs-in-a-tbm-hiv-population-is-not-related-to-anti-retroviral-therapy
#16
M E Török, G Aljayyoussi, D Waterhouse, Tth Chau, Nth Mai, N H Phu, T T Hien, W Hope, J J Farrar, S A Ward
A placebo-controlled trial that compares the outcomes of immediate versus deferred initiation of antiretroviral therapy in HIV+ve Tuberculous Meningitis (TBM) patients was conducted in Vietnam in 2011. Here, the pharmacokinetics of Rifampicin, Isoniazid, Pyrazinamide and Ethambutol were investigated in the presence and absence of anti-HIV treatment in 85 patients. Pharmacokinetic analyses show that HIV therapy has no significant impact upon the pharmacokinetics of TB drugs in this cohort. The same population, however, displayed generally low CSF and systemic exposures to rifampicin compared to previously reported HIV -ve cohorts...
February 4, 2017: Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27855070/pharmacokinetics-of-the-first-line-antituberculosis-drugs-in-ghanaian-children-with-tuberculosis-with-or-without-hiv-coinfection
#17
Sampson Antwi, Hongmei Yang, Anthony Enimil, Anima M Sarfo, Fizza S Gillani, Daniel Ansong, Albert Dompreh, Antoinette Orstin, Theresa Opoku, Dennis Bosomtwe, Lubbe Wiesner, Jennifer Norman, Charles A Peloquin, Awewura Kwara
Although human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection is the most important risk factor for a poor antituberculosis (anti-TB) treatment response, its effect on the pharmacokinetics of the first-line drugs in children is understudied. This study examined the pharmacokinetics of the four first-line anti-TB drugs in children with TB with and without HIV coinfection. Ghanaian children with TB on isoniazid, rifampin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol for at least 4 weeks had blood samples collected predose and at 1, 2, 4, and 8 hours postdose...
February 2017: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27742640/a-faropenem-linezolid-and-moxifloxacin-regimen-for-both-drug-susceptible-and-multidrug-resistant-tuberculosis-in-children-flame-path-on-the-milky-way
#18
Devyani Deshpande, Shashikant Srivastava, Eric Nuermberger, Jotam G Pasipanodya, Soumya Swaminathan, Tawanda Gumbo
BACKGROUND:  The regimen of linezolid and moxifloxacin was found to be efficacious in the hollow fiber system model of pediatric intracellular tuberculosis. However, its kill rate was slower than the standard 3-drug regimen of isoniazid, rifampin, and pyrazinamide. We wanted to examine the effect of adding a third oral agent, faropenem, to this dual combination. METHODS:  We performed a series of studies in the hollow fiber system model of intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis, by mimicking pediatric pharmacokinetics of each antibiotic...
November 1, 2016: Clinical Infectious Diseases: An Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27742636/drug-concentration-thresholds-predictive-of-therapy-failure-and-death-in-children-with-tuberculosis-bread-crumb-trails-in-random-forests
#19
Soumya Swaminathan, Jotam G Pasipanodya, Geetha Ramachandran, A K Hemanth Kumar, Shashikant Srivastava, Devyani Deshpande, Eric Nuermberger, Tawanda Gumbo
BACKGROUND:  The role of drug concentrations in clinical outcomes in children with tuberculosis is unclear. Target concentrations for dose optimization are unknown. METHODS:  Plasma drug concentrations measured in Indian children with tuberculosis were modeled using compartmental pharmacokinetic analyses. The children were followed until end of therapy to ascertain therapy failure or death. An ensemble of artificial intelligence algorithms, including random forests, was used to identify predictors of clinical outcome from among 30 clinical, laboratory, and pharmacokinetic variables...
November 1, 2016: Clinical Infectious Diseases: An Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27724114/the-challenges-of-pharmacokinetic-variability-of-first-line-anti-tb-drugs
#20
REVIEW
Bella Devaleenal Daniel, Geetha Ramachandran, Soumya Swaminathan
Inter-individual variations in the pharmacokinetics (PK) of anti-TB drugs are known to occur, which could have important therapeutic implications in patient management. Areas covered: We compiled factors responsible for PK variability of anti-TB drugs reported from different settings that would give a better understanding about the challenges of PK variability of anti-TB medications. We searched PubMed data base and Google scholar from 1976 to the present using the key words 'Pharmacokinetics', 'pharmacokinetic variability', 'first-line anti-TB therapy', 'Rifampicin', 'Isoniazid', 'Ethambutol', 'Pyrazinamide', 'food', 'nutritional status', 'HIV', 'diabetes', 'genetic polymorphisms' and 'pharmacokinetic interactions'...
January 2017: Expert Review of Clinical Pharmacology
keyword
keyword
109383
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"