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Bacteria cell membrane

Xiaxia Meng, Dengwu Li, Dan Zhou, Dongmei Wang, Qiaoxiao Liu, Sufang Fan
ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Juniperus rigida is used as Tibetan and Mongolian medicine in China for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, nephritis, brucellosis and other various inflammatory diseases. AIM OF THE STUDY: To evaluate antibacterial potential of essential oils from J. rigida leaves against Klebsiella pneumoniae and to examine its possible related mechanisms. The study was undertaken in order to scientifically validate the traditional use of J. rigida...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Ethnopharmacology
Florian Graef, Branko Vukosavljevic, Jean-Philippe Michel, Marius Wirth, Oliver Ries, Chiara De Rossi, Maike Windbergs, Véronique Rosilio, Christian Ducho, Sarah Gordon, Claus-Michael Lehr
Gram-negative bacteria possess a unique and complex cell envelope, composed of an inner and outer membrane separated by an intermediate cell wall-containing periplasm. This tripartite structure acts intrinsically as a significant biological barrier, often limiting the permeation of anti-infectives, and so preventing such drugs from reaching their target. Furthermore, identification of the specific permeation-limiting envelope component proves difficult in the case of many anti-infectives, due to the challenges associated with isolation of individual cell envelope structures in bacterial culture...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Controlled Release: Official Journal of the Controlled Release Society
Pradipta Ranjan Rauta, Sarbani Ashe, Debasis Nayak, Bismita Nayak
Virulence-related outer membrane proteins (Omps) are expressed in bacteria (Gram-negative) such as V. cholerae and are vital to bacterial invasion in to eukaryotic cell and survival within macrophages that could be best candidate for development of vaccine against V. cholerae. Applying in silico approaches, the 3-D model of the Omp was developed using Swiss model server and validated byProSA and Procheck web server. The continuous stretch of amino acid sequences 26mer: RTRSNSGLLTWGDKQTITLEYGDPAL and 31mer: FFAGGDNNLRGYGYKSISPQDASGALTGAKY having B-cell binding sites were selected from sequence alignment after B cell epitopes prediction by BCPred and AAP prediction modules of BCPreds...
October 12, 2016: Computational Biology and Chemistry
Daniela Albanesi, Diego de Mendoza
Phospholipids and fatty acids are not only one of the major components of cell membranes but also important metabolic intermediates in bacteria. Since the fatty acid biosynthetic pathway is essential and energetically expensive, organisms have developed a diversity of homeostatic mechanisms to fine-tune the concentration of lipids at particular levels. FapR is the first global regulator of lipid synthesis discovered in bacteria and is largely conserved in Gram-positive organisms including important human pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus anthracis, and Listeria monocytogenes...
2016: Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences
Katherine C Faulkner, Katherine A Hurley, Douglas B Weibel
Antibiotic adjuvant therapy represents an exciting opportunity to enhance the activity of clinical antibiotics by co-dosing with a secondary small molecule. Successful adjuvants decrease the concentration of antibiotics used to defeat bacteria, increase activity (in some cases introducing activity against organisms that are drug resistant), and reduce the frequency at which drug-resistant bacteria emerge. We report that 5-alkyloxytryptamines are a new class of broad-spectrum antibacterial agents with exciting activity as antibiotic adjuvants...
October 5, 2016: Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters
Julia I Tandberg, Leidy X Lagos, Petter Langlete, Eva Berger, Anne-Lise Rishovd, Norbert Roos, Deepa Varkey, Ian T Paulsen, Hanne C Winther-Larsen
Membrane vesicles (MVs) are spherical particles naturally released from the membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Bacterial MV production is associated with a range of phenotypes including biofilm formation, horizontal gene transfer, toxin delivery, modulation of host immune responses and virulence. This study reports comparative profiling of MVs from bacterial strains isolated from three widely disperse geographical areas. Mass spectrometry identified 119, 159 and 142 proteins in MVs from three different strains of Piscirickettsia salmonis isolated from salmonids in Chile (LF-89), Norway (NVI 5692) and Canada (NVI 5892), respectively...
2016: PloS One
Paola Sperandeo, Alessandra M Martorana, Alessandra Polissi
The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria is an asymmetric lipid bilayer containing a unique glycolipid, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in its outer leaflet. LPS molecules confer to the OM peculiar permeability barrier properties enabling Gram-negative bacteria to exclude many toxic compounds, including clinically useful antibiotics, and to survive harsh environments. Transport of LPS poses several problems to the cells due to the amphipatic nature of this molecule. In this review we summarize the current knowledge on the LPS transport machinery, discuss the challenges associated with this process and present the solutions that bacterial cells have evolved to address the problem of LPS transport and assembly at the cell surface...
October 17, 2016: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta
Maite L Ortiz-Suarez, Firdaus Samsudin, Thomas J Piggot, Peter J Bond, Syma Khalid
OmpA is a multidomain protein found in the outer membranes of most Gram-negative bacteria. Despite a wealth of reported structural and biophysical studies, the structure-function relationships of this protein remain unclear. For example, it is still debated whether it functions as a pore, and the precise molecular role it plays in attachment to the peptidoglycan of the periplasm is unknown. The absence of a consensus view is partly due to the lack of a complete structure of the full-length protein. To address this issue, we performed molecular-dynamics simulations of the full-length model of the OmpA dimer proposed by Robinson and co-workers...
October 18, 2016: Biophysical Journal
Agnieszka Nowak, Izabela Greń, Agnieszka Mrozik
The changes in the cellular fatty acid composition of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia KB2 during co-metabolic degradation of monochlorophenols in the presence of phenol as well as its adaptive mechanisms to these compounds were studied. It was found that bacteria were capable of degrading 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) completely in the presence of phenol, while 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) and 3-chlorophenol (3-CP) they degraded partially. The analysis of the fatty acid profiles indicated that adaptive mechanisms of bacteria depended on earlier exposure to phenol, which isomer they degraded, and on incubation time...
December 2016: World Journal of Microbiology & Biotechnology
Chao Tan, Jun Wang, Yifang Hu, Peng Wang, Lili Zou
Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis are two of the most significant opportunistic human pathogens, causing medical implant and nosocomial infections worldwide. These bacteria contain surface proteins that play crucial roles in multiple biological processes. It has become apparent that they have evolved a number of unique mechanisms by which they can immobilise proteins on their surface. Notably, a conserved cell membrane-anchored enzyme, sortase A (SrtA), can catalyse the covalent attachment of precursor bacterial cell wall-attached proteins to peptidoglycan...
October 18, 2016: Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek
Yoo Jeong Kim, Hyejin Jeon, Seok Hyeon Na, Hyo Il Kwon, Gati Noble Selasi, Asiimwe Nicholas, Tae In Park, Sang Hwa Lee, Je Chul Lee
Stenotrophomonas maltophilia has become one of the most prevalent opportunistic pathogens in hospitalized patients. This microorganism secretes outer membrane vesicles (OMVs), but the pathogenesis of S. maltophilia as it relates to OMVs has not been characterized. This study investigated the cytotoxic activity of S. maltophilia OMVs and their ability to induce inflammatory responses both in vitro and in vivo S. maltophilia ATCC 13637 and two clinical isolates were found to secrete spherical OMVs during in vitro culture...
October 17, 2016: Pathogens and Disease
Dayoung Park, Narine Arabyan, Cynthia C Williams, Ting Song, Anupam Mitra, Bart C Weimer, Emanual Maverakis, Carlito B Lebrilla
Although gut host-pathogen interactions are glycan-mediated processes, few details are known about the participating structures. Here we employ high-resolution mass spectrometric profiling to comprehensively identify and quantitatively measure the exact modifications of native intestinal epithelial cell surface N-glycans induced by S. Typhimurium infection. Sixty minutes post-infection, select sialylated structures showed decreases in terms of total number and abundances. To assess the effect of cell surface mannosylation, we selectively rerouted glycan expression on the host using the alpha-mannosidase inhibitor, kifunensine, toward overexpression of high mannose...
October 17, 2016: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics: MCP
Gitishree Das, Jayanta Kumar Patra, Kwang-Hyun Baek
Endophytic bacteria (EB) are a rich source of secondary metabolites with medicinal importance. In this study, EB were isolated from the bottle brush herb Equisetum arvense and identified based on 16S rRNA sequencing. Evaluation of its antibacterial potential was conducted using two common foodborne pathogenic bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 12600 and Escherichia coli O157:H7 ATCC 43890. Out of 103 identified EB, three species, Streptomyces albolongus, Dermacoccus sp., and Mycobacterium sp., showed significant antibacterial activity against S...
October 18, 2016: Foodborne Pathogens and Disease
Mika A Brown, Michael G Potroz, Seoh-Wei Teh, Nam-Joon Cho
Due to the global prevalence of Chlamydiae, exploring studies of diverse antichlamydial compounds is important in the development of effective treatment strategies and global infectious disease management. Chlamydiaceae is the most widely known bacterial family of the Chlamydiae order. Among the species in the family Chlamydiaceae, Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydia pneumoniae cause common human diseases, while Chlamydia abortus, Chlamydia psittaci, and Chlamydia suis represent zoonotic threats or are endemic in human food sources...
October 16, 2016: Microorganisms
Lidia Araújo-Bazán, Laura B Ruiz-Avila, David Andreu, Sonia Huecas, José M Andreu
Cell division protein FtsZ is the organizer of the cytokinetic ring in almost all bacteria and a target for the discovery of new antibacterial agents that are needed to counter widespread antibiotic resistance. Bacterial cytological profiling, using quantitative microscopy, is a powerful approach for identifying the mechanism of action of antibacterial molecules affecting different cellular pathways. We have determined the cytological profile on Bacillus subtilis cells of a selection of small molecule inhibitors targeting FtsZ on different binding sites...
2016: Frontiers in Microbiology
Roberto Anaya-Prado, Manuel Fernando Barba-Anaya, Jorge Manuel Sánchez-González, Michelle Marie Anaya-Fernández, Ana Bertha Zavalza-Gómez, Francisco Gil-Villarreal, Alejandro Bravo-Cuellar, Andrea Del Carmen Grijalva-Solis
Studies have shown that triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1) is the mediator and activator of neutrophils and monocytes after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), heat-inactivated Gram (-) bacteria, Gram (+) bacteria or fungi. Different studies have measured the expression of TREM-1 in patients with bacterial infections and critical states. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression of TREM-1 in circulating maternal leukocytes in premature rupture of the membranes (PRM)...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology: the Journal of the Institute of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Laura M Faure, Jean-Bernard Fiche, Leon Espinosa, Adrien Ducret, Vivek Anantharaman, Jennifer Luciano, Sébastien Lhospice, Salim T Islam, Julie Tréguier, Mélanie Sotes, Erkin Kuru, Michael S Van Nieuwenhze, Yves V Brun, Olivier Théodoly, Aravind L, Marcelo Nollmann, Tâm Mignot
Various rod-shaped bacteria mysteriously glide on surfaces in the absence of appendages such as flagella or pili. In the deltaproteobacterium Myxococcus xanthus, a putative gliding motility machinery (Agl-Glt) localizes to so-called Focal Adhesion sites (FA) that form stationary contact points with the underlying surface. We discovered that the Agl-Glt machinery contains an inner-membrane motor complex that moves intracellularly along a right-handed helical path, and when it becomes stationary at FA sites, it powers a left-handed rotation of the cell around its long axis...
October 5, 2016: Nature
Anatoliy Kubyshkin, Denis Chegodar, Andrew Katsev, Armen Petrosyan, Yuri Krivorutchenko, Olga Postnikova
BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: To investigate the effect of nanosilver particles in solution stabilized in a matrix of sodium alginate on the growth and development of pathogenic bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Enterobacter cloacae, the antibiotic-resistant strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the yeast-like fungus Candida albicans, and the luminescent bacteria Photobacterium leiognathi Sh1. METHODS: Isolates of pathogenic bacteria obtained from bronchoalveolar and peritoneal lavage samples from Wistar rats with experimental pneumonia and peritonitis were tested for their susceptibility to silver nanoparticles in solution with an alginate stabilizer...
2016: Biochemistry & Molecular Biology Journal
Martin Aepfelbacher, Manuel Wolters
Pathogenic bacteria of the genus Yersinia include Y. pestis-the agent of plaque-and two enteropathogens, Y. enterocolitica, and Y. pseudotuberculosis. These pathogens have developed an array of virulence factors aimed at manipulating Rho GTP-binding proteins and the actin cytoskeleton in host cells to cross the intestinal barrier and suppress the immune system. Yersinia virulence factors include outer membrane proteins triggering cell invasion by binding to integrins, effector proteins injected into host cells to manipulate Rho protein functions and a Rho protein-activating exotoxin...
October 16, 2016: Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology
Kerrie L May, Thomas J Silhavy
The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria is positioned at the frontline of the cell's interaction with its environment and provides a barrier against influx of external toxins while still allowing import of nutrients and excretion of wastes. It is a remarkable asymmetric bilayer with a glycolipid surface-exposed leaflet and a glycerophospholipid inner leaflet. Lipid asymmetry is key to OM barrier function and several different systems actively maintain this lipid asymmetry. All OM components are synthesized in the cytosol before being secreted and assembled into a contiguous membrane on the other side of the cell wall...
October 11, 2016: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta
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