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Raymond Dolan

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30006361/beta-blocker-propranolol-modulates-decision-urgency-during-sequential-information-gathering
#1
Tobias U Hauser, Michael Moutoussis, Nina Purg, Peter Dayan, Raymond J Dolan
Arbitrating between timely choice and extended information gathering is critical for effective decision making. Aberrant information gathering behaviour is thought to be a feature of psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and obsessive-compulsive disorder, but we know little about the underlying neurocognitive control mechanisms. In a double-blind placebo-controlled drug study involving 60 healthy human subjects (30 female), we examined the effects of noradrenaline and dopamine antagonism on information gathering during performance of an information sampling task...
July 13, 2018: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29979685/age-dependent-pavlovian-biases-influence-motor-decision-making
#2
Xiuli Chen, Robb B Rutledge, Harriet R Brown, Raymond J Dolan, Sven Bestmann, Joseph M Galea
Motor decision-making is an essential component of everyday life which requires weighing potential rewards and punishments against the probability of successfully executing an action. To achieve this, humans rely on two key mechanisms; a flexible, instrumental, value-dependent process and a hardwired, Pavlovian, value-independent process. In economic decision-making, age-related decline in risk taking is explained by reduced Pavlovian biases that promote action toward reward. Although healthy ageing has also been associated with decreased risk-taking in motor decision-making, it is currently unknown whether this is a result of changes in Pavlovian biases, instrumental processes or a combination of both...
July 6, 2018: PLoS Computational Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29952550/retention-index-prediction-using-quantitative-structure-retention-relationships-for-improving-structure-identification-in-non-targeted-metabolomics
#3
Yabin Wen, Ruth I J Amos, Mohammad Talebi, Roman Szucs, John W Dolan, Christopher A Pohl, Paul Raymond Haddad
Structure identification in non-targeted metabolomics based on liquid-chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS) remains a significant challenge. Quantitative structure-retention relationship (QSRR) modeling is a technique capable of accelerating the structure identification of metabolites by predicting their retention, allowing false positives to be eliminated during the interpretation of metabolomics data. In this work, 191 compounds were grouped according to molecular weight and a QSRR study was carried out on the 34 resulting groups to eliminate false positives...
June 28, 2018: Analytical Chemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29706512/decodability-of-reward-learning-signals-predicts-mood-fluctuations
#4
Eran Eldar, Charlotte Roth, Peter Dayan, Raymond J Dolan
Our mood often fluctuates without warning. Recent accounts propose that these fluctuations might be preceded by changes in how we process reward. According to this view, the degree to which reward improves our mood reflects not only characteristics of the reward itself (e.g., its magnitude) but also how receptive to reward we happen to be. Differences in receptivity to reward have been suggested to play an important role in the emergence of mood episodes in psychiatric disorders [1-16]. However, despite substantial theory, the relationship between reward processing and daily fluctuations of mood has yet to be tested directly...
May 7, 2018: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29700475/genome-wide-association-analyses-identify-44-risk-variants-and-refine-the-genetic-architecture-of-major-depression
#5
Naomi R Wray, Stephan Ripke, Manuel Mattheisen, Maciej Trzaskowski, Enda M Byrne, Abdel Abdellaoui, Mark J Adams, Esben Agerbo, Tracy M Air, Till M F Andlauer, Silviu-Alin Bacanu, Marie Bækvad-Hansen, Aartjan F T Beekman, Tim B Bigdeli, Elisabeth B Binder, Douglas R H Blackwood, Julien Bryois, Henriette N Buttenschøn, Jonas Bybjerg-Grauholm, Na Cai, Enrique Castelao, Jane Hvarregaard Christensen, Toni-Kim Clarke, Jonathan I R Coleman, Lucía Colodro-Conde, Baptiste Couvy-Duchesne, Nick Craddock, Gregory E Crawford, Cheynna A Crowley, Hassan S Dashti, Gail Davies, Ian J Deary, Franziska Degenhardt, Eske M Derks, Nese Direk, Conor V Dolan, Erin C Dunn, Thalia C Eley, Nicholas Eriksson, Valentina Escott-Price, Farnush Hassan Farhadi Kiadeh, Hilary K Finucane, Andreas J Forstner, Josef Frank, Héléna A Gaspar, Michael Gill, Paola Giusti-Rodríguez, Fernando S Goes, Scott D Gordon, Jakob Grove, Lynsey S Hall, Eilis Hannon, Christine Søholm Hansen, Thomas F Hansen, Stefan Herms, Ian B Hickie, Per Hoffmann, Georg Homuth, Carsten Horn, Jouke-Jan Hottenga, David M Hougaard, Ming Hu, Craig L Hyde, Marcus Ising, Rick Jansen, Fulai Jin, Eric Jorgenson, James A Knowles, Isaac S Kohane, Julia Kraft, Warren W Kretzschmar, Jesper Krogh, Zoltán Kutalik, Jacqueline M Lane, Yihan Li, Yun Li, Penelope A Lind, Xiaoxiao Liu, Leina Lu, Donald J MacIntyre, Dean F MacKinnon, Robert M Maier, Wolfgang Maier, Jonathan Marchini, Hamdi Mbarek, Patrick McGrath, Peter McGuffin, Sarah E Medland, Divya Mehta, Christel M Middeldorp, Evelin Mihailov, Yuri Milaneschi, Lili Milani, Jonathan Mill, Francis M Mondimore, Grant W Montgomery, Sara Mostafavi, Niamh Mullins, Matthias Nauck, Bernard Ng, Michel G Nivard, Dale R Nyholt, Paul F O'Reilly, Hogni Oskarsson, Michael J Owen, Jodie N Painter, Carsten Bøcker Pedersen, Marianne Giørtz Pedersen, Roseann E Peterson, Erik Pettersson, Wouter J Peyrot, Giorgio Pistis, Danielle Posthuma, Shaun M Purcell, Jorge A Quiroz, Per Qvist, John P Rice, Brien P Riley, Margarita Rivera, Saira Saeed Mirza, Richa Saxena, Robert Schoevers, Eva C Schulte, Ling Shen, Jianxin Shi, Stanley I Shyn, Engilbert Sigurdsson, Grant B C Sinnamon, Johannes H Smit, Daniel J Smith, Hreinn Stefansson, Stacy Steinberg, Craig A Stockmeier, Fabian Streit, Jana Strohmaier, Katherine E Tansey, Henning Teismann, Alexander Teumer, Wesley Thompson, Pippa A Thomson, Thorgeir E Thorgeirsson, Chao Tian, Matthew Traylor, Jens Treutlein, Vassily Trubetskoy, André G Uitterlinden, Daniel Umbricht, Sandra Van der Auwera, Albert M van Hemert, Alexander Viktorin, Peter M Visscher, Yunpeng Wang, Bradley T Webb, Shantel Marie Weinsheimer, Jürgen Wellmann, Gonneke Willemsen, Stephanie H Witt, Yang Wu, Hualin S Xi, Jian Yang, Futao Zhang, Volker Arolt, Bernhard T Baune, Klaus Berger, Dorret I Boomsma, Sven Cichon, Udo Dannlowski, E C J de Geus, J Raymond DePaulo, Enrico Domenici, Katharina Domschke, Tõnu Esko, Hans J Grabe, Steven P Hamilton, Caroline Hayward, Andrew C Heath, David A Hinds, Kenneth S Kendler, Stefan Kloiber, Glyn Lewis, Qingqin S Li, Susanne Lucae, Pamela F A Madden, Patrik K Magnusson, Nicholas G Martin, Andrew M McIntosh, Andres Metspalu, Ole Mors, Preben Bo Mortensen, Bertram Müller-Myhsok, Merete Nordentoft, Markus M Nöthen, Michael C O'Donovan, Sara A Paciga, Nancy L Pedersen, Brenda W J H Penninx, Roy H Perlis, David J Porteous, James B Potash, Martin Preisig, Marcella Rietschel, Catherine Schaefer, Thomas G Schulze, Jordan W Smoller, Kari Stefansson, Henning Tiemeier, Rudolf Uher, Henry Völzke, Myrna M Weissman, Thomas Werge, Ashley R Winslow, Cathryn M Lewis, Douglas F Levinson, Gerome Breen, Anders D Børglum, Patrick F Sullivan
Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a common illness accompanied by considerable morbidity, mortality, costs, and heightened risk of suicide. We conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis based in 135,458 cases and 344,901 controls and identified 44 independent and significant loci. The genetic findings were associated with clinical features of major depression and implicated brain regions exhibiting anatomical differences in cases. Targets of antidepressant medications and genes involved in gene splicing were enriched for smaller association signal...
May 2018: Nature Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29689053/agent-specific-learning-signals-for-self-other-distinction-during-mentalising
#6
Sam Ereira, Raymond J Dolan, Zeb Kurth-Nelson
Humans have a remarkable ability to simulate the minds of others. How the brain distinguishes between mental states attributed to self and mental states attributed to someone else is unknown. Here, we investigated how fundamental neural learning signals are selectively attributed to different agents. Specifically, we asked whether learning signals are encoded in agent-specific neural patterns or whether a self-other distinction depends on encoding agent identity separately from this learning signal. To examine this, we tasked subjects to learn continuously 2 models of the same environment, such that one was selectively attributed to self and the other was selectively attributed to another agent...
April 2018: PLoS Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29643456/publisher-correction-metacognitive-impairments-extend-perceptual-decision-making-weaknesses-in-compulsivity
#7
Tobias U Hauser, Micah Allen, Geraint Rees, Raymond J Dolan
A correction to this article has been published and is linked from the HTML and PDF versions of this paper. The error has been fixed in the paper.
April 11, 2018: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29549530/risk-preference-and-choice-stochasticity-during-decisions-for-other-people
#8
Francesco Rigoli, Katrin H Preller, Raymond J Dolan
In several contexts, such as finance and politics, people make choices that are relevant for others but irrelevant for oneself. Focusing on decision-making under risk, we compared monetary choices made for one's own interest with choices made on behalf of an anonymous individual. Consistent with the previous literature, other-interest choices were characterized by an increased gambling propensity. We also investigated choice stochasticity, which captures how much decisions vary in similar conditions. An aspect related to choice stochasticity is how much decisions are tuned to the option values, and we found that this was higher during self-interest than during other-interest choices...
April 2018: Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29481966/value-encoding-in-the-globus-pallidus-fmri-reveals-an-interaction-effect-between-reward-and-dopamine-drive
#9
Vincenzo G Fiore, Tobias Nolte, Francesco Rigoli, Peter Smittenaar, Xiaosi Gu, Raymond J Dolan
The external part of the globus pallidus (GPe) is a core nucleus of the basal ganglia (BG) whose activity is disrupted under conditions of low dopamine release, as in Parkinson's disease. Current models assume decreased dopamine release in the dorsal striatum results in deactivation of dorsal GPe, which in turn affects motor expression via a regulatory effect on other nuclei of the BG. However, recent studies in healthy and pathological animal models have reported neural dynamics that do not match with this view of the GPe as a relay in the BG circuit...
June 2018: NeuroImage
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29456782/other-people-s-money-the-role-of-reciprocity-and-social-uncertainty-in-decisions-for-others
#10
Ivo Vlaev, Brian Wallace, Nicholas Wright, Antoinette Nicolle, Paul Dolan, Raymond Dolan
Many important decisions are taken not by the person who will ultimately gain or lose from the outcome, but on their behalf, by somebody else. We examined economic decision-making about risk and time in situations in which deciders chose for others who also chose for them. We propose that this unique setting, which has not been studied before, elicits perception of reciprocity that prompts a unique bias in preferences. We found that decision-makers are less patient (more discounting), and more risk averse for losses than gains, with other peoples' money, especially when their choices for others are more uncertain...
June 2017: Journal of Neuroscience, Psychology, and Economics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29440429/locus-coeruleus-integrity-in-old-age-is-selectively-related-to-memories-linked-with-salient-negative-events
#11
Dorothea Hämmerer, Martina F Callaghan, Alexandra Hopkins, Julian Kosciessa, Matthew Betts, Arturo Cardenas-Blanco, Martin Kanowski, Nikolaus Weiskopf, Peter Dayan, Raymond J Dolan, Emrah Düzel
The locus coeruleus (LC) is the principal origin of noradrenaline in the brain. LC integrity varies considerably across healthy older individuals, and is suggested to contribute to altered cognitive functions in aging. Here we test this hypothesis using an incidental memory task that is known to be susceptible to noradrenergic modulation. We used MRI neuromelanin (NM) imaging to assess LC structural integrity and pupillometry as a putative index of LC activation in both younger and older adults. We show that older adults with reduced structural LC integrity show poorer subsequent memory...
February 27, 2018: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29325701/developmental-cognitive-neuroscience-using-latent-change-score-models-a-tutorial-and-applications
#12
REVIEW
Rogier A Kievit, Andreas M Brandmaier, Gabriel Ziegler, Anne-Laura van Harmelen, Susanne M M de Mooij, Michael Moutoussis, Ian M Goodyer, Ed Bullmore, Peter B Jones, Peter Fonagy, Ulman Lindenberger, Raymond J Dolan
Assessing and analysing individual differences in change over time is of central scientific importance to developmental neuroscience. However, the literature is based largely on cross-sectional comparisons, which reflect a variety of influences and cannot directly represent change. We advocate using latent change score (LCS) models in longitudinal samples as a statistical framework to tease apart the complex processes underlying lifespan development in brain and behaviour using longitudinal data. LCS models provide a flexible framework that naturally accommodates key developmental questions as model parameters and can even be used, with some limitations, in cases with only two measurement occasions...
November 22, 2017: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29276055/morphometric-similarity-networks-detect-microscale-cortical-organization-and-predict-inter-individual-cognitive-variation
#13
Jakob Seidlitz, František Váša, Maxwell Shinn, Rafael Romero-Garcia, Kirstie J Whitaker, Petra E Vértes, Konrad Wagstyl, Paul Kirkpatrick Reardon, Liv Clasen, Siyuan Liu, Adam Messinger, David A Leopold, Peter Fonagy, Raymond J Dolan, Peter B Jones, Ian M Goodyer, Armin Raznahan, Edward T Bullmore
Macroscopic cortical networks are important for cognitive function, but it remains challenging to construct anatomically plausible individual structural connectomes from human neuroimaging. We introduce a new technique for cortical network mapping based on inter-regional similarity of multiple morphometric parameters measured using multimodal MRI. In three cohorts (two human, one macaque), we find that the resulting morphometric similarity networks (MSNs) have a complex topological organization comprising modules and high-degree hubs...
January 3, 2018: Neuron
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29274746/structural-covariance-networks-are-coupled-to-expression-of-genes-enriched-in-supragranular-layers-of-the-human-cortex
#14
Rafael Romero-Garcia, Kirstie J Whitaker, František Váša, Jakob Seidlitz, Maxwell Shinn, Peter Fonagy, Raymond J Dolan, Peter B Jones, Ian M Goodyer, Edward T Bullmore, Petra E Vértes
Complex network topology is characteristic of many biological systems, including anatomical and functional brain networks (connectomes). Here, we first constructed a structural covariance network from MRI measures of cortical thickness on 296 healthy volunteers, aged 14-24 years. Next, we designed a new algorithm for matching sample locations from the Allen Brain Atlas to the nodes of the SCN. Subsequently we used this to define, transcriptomic brain networks by estimating gene co-expression between pairs of cortical regions...
May 1, 2018: NeuroImage
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29249811/increased-decision-thresholds-trigger-extended-information-gathering-across-the-compulsivity-spectrum
#15
Tobias U Hauser, Michael Moutoussis, Peter Dayan, Raymond J Dolan
Indecisiveness and doubt are cognitive phenotypes of compulsive disorders, including obsessive-compulsive disorder. Little is known regarding the cognitive mechanisms that drive these behaviours across a compulsivity spectrum. Here, we used a sequential information gathering task to study indecisiveness in subjects with high and low obsessive-compulsive scores. These subjects were selected from a large population-representative database, and matched for intellectual and psychiatric factors. We show that high compulsive subjects sampled more information and performed better when sampling was cost-free...
December 18, 2017: Translational Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29190275/correction-approach-induced-biases-in-human-information-sampling
#16
Laurence T Hunt, Robb B Rutledge, W M Nishantha Malalasekera, Steven W Kennerley, Raymond J Dolan
[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.2000638.].
November 2017: PLoS Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29177462/cohort-profile-the-nspn-2400-cohort-a-developmental-sample-supporting-the-wellcome-trust-neuroscience-in-psychiatry-network
#17
Beatrix Kiddle, Becky Inkster, Gita Prabhu, Michael Moutoussis, Kirstie J Whitaker, Edward T Bullmore, Raymond J Dolan, Peter Fonagy, Ian M Goodyer, Peter B Jones
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 1, 2018: International Journal of Epidemiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29061228/neural-and-computational-processes-underlying-dynamic-changes-in-self-esteem
#18
Geert-Jan Will, Robb B Rutledge, Michael Moutoussis, Raymond J Dolan
Self-esteem is shaped by the appraisals we receive from others. Here, we characterize neural and computational mechanisms underlying this form of social influence. We introduce a computational model that captures fluctuations in self-esteem engendered by prediction errors that quantify the difference between expected and received social feedback. Using functional MRI, we show these social prediction errors correlate with activity in ventral striatum/subgenual anterior cingulate cortex, while updates in self-esteem resulting from these errors co-varied with activity in ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC)...
October 24, 2017: ELife
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29028323/benchmarking-of-computational-methods-for-creation-of-retention-models-in-quantitative-structure-retention-relationships-studies
#19
Ruth I J Amos, Eva Tyteca, Mohammad Talebi, Paul R Haddad, Roman Szucs, John W Dolan, Christopher A Pohl
Quantitative structure-retention relationship (QSRR) models are powerful techniques for the prediction of retention times of analytes, where chromatographic retention parameters are correlated with molecular descriptors encoding chemical structures of analytes. Many QSRR models contain geometrical descriptors derived from the three-dimensional (3D) spatial coordinates of computationally predicted structures for the analytes. Therefore, it is sensible to calculate these structures correctly, as any error is likely to carry over to the resulting QSRR models...
November 27, 2017: Journal of Chemical Information and Modeling
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28981514/a-unifying-bayesian-account-of-contextual-effects-in-value-based-choice
#20
Francesco Rigoli, Christoph Mathys, Karl J Friston, Raymond J Dolan
Empirical evidence suggests the incentive value of an option is affected by other options available during choice and by options presented in the past. These contextual effects are hard to reconcile with classical theories and have inspired accounts where contextual influences play a crucial role. However, each account only addresses one or the other of the empirical findings and a unifying perspective has been elusive. Here, we offer a unifying theory of context effects on incentive value attribution and choice based on normative Bayesian principles...
October 2017: PLoS Computational Biology
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