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Sleep fragmentation

Susana Vacas, Vincent Degos, Mervyn Maze
BACKGROUND: Sleep is integral to biologic function, and sleep disruption can result in both physiological and psychologic dysfunction including cognitive decline. Surgery activates the innate immune system, inducing neuroinflammatory changes that interfere with cognition. Because surgical patients with sleep disorders have an increased likelihood of exhibiting postoperative delirium, an acute form of cognitive decline, we investigated the contribution of perioperative sleep fragmentation (SF) to the neuroinflammatory and cognitive responses of surgery...
October 11, 2016: Anesthesia and Analgesia
Mahzad Akbarpour, Abdelnaby Khalyfa, Zhuanghong Qiao, Alex Gileles-Hillel, Isaac Almendros, Ramon Farré, David Gozal
STUDY OBJECTIVE: The presence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients with cancer appears to be accompanied by poorer outcomes. However, the mechanisms underlying such association are unknown. Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), including CD8+ T cells, function as cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), and mount immune responses to cancer by the release of cytolytic enzymes, including granzyme B (GzmB), perforin (Prf) and cytokines such as interferon (IFN)-γ. METHODS: Using established in vivo mouse models, we investigated CD8+ T cells and cancer stem cells (CSC) in intermittent hypoxia (IH) and sleep fragmentation (SF) in the context of tumor environment...
October 10, 2016: Sleep
Nadia Gildeh, Panagis Drakatos, Sean Higgins, Ivana Rosenzweig, Brian D Kent
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) causes daytime fatigue and sleepiness, and has an established relationship with cardiovascular and metabolic disease. Recent years have seen the emergence of an evidence base linking OSA with an increased risk of degenerative neurological disease and associated cognitive impairment, an accelerated rate of decline in kidney function with an increased risk of clinically significant chronic kidney disease (CKD), and with a significantly higher rate of cancer incidence and death. This review evaluates the evidence base linking OSA with these seemingly unrelated co-morbidities, and explores potential mechanistic links underpinning their development in patients with OSA, including intermittent hypoxia (IH), sleep fragmentation, sympathetic excitation, and immune dysregulation...
September 2016: Journal of Thoracic Disease
Valeriy A Poroyko, Alba Carreras, Abdelnaby Khalyfa, Ahamed A Khalyfa, Vanessa Leone, Eduard Peris, Isaac Almendros, Alex Gileles-Hillel, Zhuanhong Qiao, Nathaniel Hubert, Ramon Farré, Eugene B Chang, David Gozal
Chronic sleep fragmentation (SF) commonly occurs in human populations, and although it does not involve circadian shifts or sleep deprivation, it markedly alters feeding behaviors ultimately promoting obesity and insulin resistance. These symptoms are known to be related to the host gut microbiota. Mice were exposed to SF for 4 weeks and then allowed to recover for 2 weeks. Taxonomic profiles of fecal microbiota were obtained prospectively, and conventionalization experiments were performed in germ-free mice...
October 14, 2016: Scientific Reports
Sara C Owczarczak-Garstecka, Oliver H P Burman
Previous research on humans and animals suggests that the analysis of sleep patterns may reliably inform us about welfare status, but little research of this kind has been carried out for non-human animals in an applied context. This study explored the use of sleep and resting behaviour as indicators of welfare by describing the activity patterns of dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) housed in rescue shelters, and comparing their sleep patterns to other behavioural and cognitive measures of welfare. Sleep and activity patterns were observed over five non-consecutive days in a population of 15 dogs...
2016: PloS One
Udaya Seneviratne, Ray C Boston, Mark Cook, Wendyl D'Souza
OBJECTIVE: We sought to investigate the temporal patterns and sleep-wake cycle-related epileptiform discharges (EDs) in genetic generalized epilepsies (GGEs). METHODS: We studied 24-hour ambulatory electroencephalography (EEG) recordings of patients with GGE, diagnosed and classified according to the International League against Epilepsy criteria. We manually coded the type of discharge, time of occurrence, duration, and arousal state of each ED. We employed mixed effects Poisson regression modeling to study the temporal distribution of epileptiform discharges...
October 7, 2016: Epilepsy & Behavior: E&B
Wei-Lun Lin, Li-Wei Lo, Hau-Ruey Chen, Chun-Ting Lai, Shinya Yamada, Shin-Huei Liu, Yu-Hui Chou, Shih-Ann Chen, Yun-Ching Fu, Terry B J Kuo
BACKGROUND: Autonomic imbalance with increased sympathetic and decreased parasympathetic activities is observed in patients after myocardial infarction (MI). We aimed to investigate sleep-related changed in autonomic regulation in left coronary artery (LCA) ligation rats. METHODS: Wireless transmission of polysomnographic recording was performed in sham and LCA ligation male rats during normal daytime sleep with and without atenolol treatment. Spectral analyses of the electroencephalogram (EEG) and electromyogram (EMG) were evaluated to define active waking (AW), quiet and paradoxical sleeps (QS, PS)...
September 30, 2016: International Journal of Cardiology
William I Wooten, Marianne S Muhlebach, Joseph Muenzer, Ceila E Loughlin, Bradley V Vaughn
Mucolipidosis II (Inclusion cell or I-cell disease) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder clinically comparable to the mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS), characterized by progressive respiratory and neurologic deterioration. Sleep problems, especially obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and disrupted sleep architecture, are observed in other lysosomal storage diseases but have not been described in mucolipidosis II. We report the progression of polysomnographic abnormalities in a child with mucolipidosis II, demonstrated by worsening sleep-related hypoventilation, OSA, and sleep state fragmentation despite advancing PAP therapy...
September 29, 2016: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine: JCSM: Official Publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine
Paulo Sérgio Azeredo Henriques
Objective: To determine the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children with attention deficit/hyperactive disorder (ADHD) and compare amplitude and latency of the P300 potential among children with and without OSA. Method: Sixty-one children with ADHD underwent oddball auditory attention tests for detection of P300 (ERPs) followed by an all-night polysomnography. The children were divided in two groups, those with and without OSA. Results: Significant decreased amplitude of the P300 potential was observed in children with OSA when compared with children without OSA...
September 2016: Arquivos de Neuro-psiquiatria
Irina Virtanen, Nea Kalleinen, Anna S Urrila, Päivi Polo-Kantola
OBJECTIVES: In sleep laboratory studies, the new environment is generally considered to disturb sleep during the first night. However, older women have rarely been studied. Although menopause and hormone therapy affect sleep, their impact on the first-night effect is virtually unknown. PARTICIPANTS: Four groups of women with no sleep laboratory experience: young on hormonal contraceptives (n = 11, 23.1 [0.5] years), perimenopausal (n = 15, 48.0 [0.4] years), postmenopausal without hormone therapy (HT; off-HT, n = 22, 63...
October 4, 2016: Behavioral Sleep Medicine
Keri S Taylor, Hisayoshi Murai, Philip J Millar, Nobuhiko Haruki, Derek S Kimmerly, Beverley L Morris, George Tomlinson, T Douglas Bradley, John S Floras
Obstructive apnea during sleep elevates the set point for efferent sympathetic outflow during wakefulness. Such resetting is attributed to hypoxia-induced upregulation of peripheral chemoreceptor and brain stem sympathetic function. Whether recurrent arousal from sleep also influences daytime muscle sympathetic nerve activity is unknown. We therefore tested, in a cohort of 48 primarily nonsleepy, middle-aged, male (30) and female (18) volunteers (age: 59±1 years, mean±SE), the hypothesis that the frequency of arousals from sleep (arousal index) would relate to daytime muscle sympathetic burst incidence, independently of the frequency of apnea or its severity...
October 3, 2016: Hypertension
Shery Goril, Dora Zalai, Louise Scott, Colin M Shapiro
OBJECTIVES: Caregivers describe significant sleep disturbances in the vast majority of children and adolescents, which is diagnosed as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD), but objective data on sleep disorders in this population are almost completely lacking. Animal models suggest that intrauterine alcohol exposure may disrupt sleep wake patterns, cause sleep fragmentation, and specifically affect the suprachiasmatic nucleus, thus disrupting melatonin secretion. The objective of this pioneering study was to evaluate sleep and melatonin abnormalities in children with FASD using objective, gold-standard measures...
July 2016: Sleep Medicine
Alexia M Thomas, Michael D Schwartz, Michael D Saxe, Thomas S Kilduff
STUDY OBJECTIVES: Although recent innovations have enabled modification of the rat genome, it is unclear whether enhanced utility of rodents as human disease models will result. We compared EEG and behavioral phenotypes of rats and mice with homozygous deletion of Cntnap2, a gene associated with cortical dysplasia-focal epilepsy (CDFE) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). METHODS: Male Cntnap2 knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) rats and male Cntnap2 KO and WT mice were implanted with telemeters to record EEG, EMG, body temperature and locomotor activity...
September 26, 2016: Sleep
Hadine Joffe, Sybil L Crawford, Marlene P Freeman, David P White, Matt T Bianchi, Semmie Kim, Nicole Economou, Julie Camuso, Janet E Hall, Lee S Cohen
CONTEXT: Women are at increased risk for mood disturbance during the menopause transition. Hot flashes (HFs), sleep disruption, and fluctuating estradiol levels correlate with menopause-associated depression but co-occur, making cause and effect relationships difficult to disentangle. OBJECTIVE: Using a GnRH agonist (GnRHa) experimental model, we investigated whether depressive symptoms are associated with HFs and/or are explained by concomitant sleep fragmentation in the absence of estradiol fluctuation...
October 2016: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Magali Saint Martin, Emilia Sforza, Emilie Crawford-Achour, Lefèvre Pascal, Georges Lienard, Roche Frédéric
OBJECTIVE: Sleep breathing disorders (SBD) are the most common sleep disorders frequently under-diagnosed in elderly populations. However, it is it well known that this disorder may contribute to the age-related cognitive decline. In a cohort of healthy elderly subjects, we performed an 8-year longitudinal study to assess whether changes in cognitive function occur in untreated SBD elderly and the nocturnal factors implicated in these changes. MATERIAL/PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 559 participants of the community-based PROOF study aged 67years at the study entry and free from neurological disorders were examined...
September 2016: Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
Marion Baillet, Bixente Dilharreguy, Karine Pérès, Jean-François Dartigues, Willy Mayo, Gwenaëlle Catheline
OBJECTIVE: Although aging is associated with alterations of both activity/rest cycle and brain structure, few studies have evaluated associations between these processes. The aim of this study was to examine relationship between activity/rest cycle quality and brain structural integrity in aging subjects by exploring both grey and white matter compartments. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Fifty-eight elderly subjects (76±0.5 years; 41% female) without dementia, sleep disorders and medications were included in the analysis...
September 21, 2016: NeuroImage
Damien Leger, Maxime Elbaz, Alexandre Dubois, Stéphane Rio, Hocine Mezghiche, Paulo Carita, Jeanne Stemmelin, Melanie Strauss
BACKGROUND: In epidemiological surveys, cognitive decline has been found to be associated with both short and long sleep duration. OBJECTIVE: Our goal was to objectively determine how total sleep time (TST) at night was associated or not with apathy or severity scores in patients with Alzheimer 's disease (AD). METHODS: During an observational first step of a clinical trial, sleep was assessed in institutionalized patients with mild or moderate AD using actigraphy (MW8, Camtech, Cambridge, UK) for 14 consecutive 24-hour periods...
September 23, 2016: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
Koliane Ouk, Juliet Aungier, A Jennifer Morton
Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive genetic neurodegenerative disorder characterised by motor and cognitive deficits, as well as sleep and circadian abnormalities. In the R6/2 mouse, a fragment model of HD, rest-activity rhythms controlled by the suprachiasmatic nucleus disintegrate completely by 4months of age. Rhythms driven by a second circadian oscillator, the methamphetamine-sensitive circadian oscillator (MASCO), are disrupted even earlier, and cannot be induced after 2months of age. Here, we studied the effect of the HD mutation on the expression of MASCO-driven rhythms in a more slowly developing, genetically relevant mouse model of HD, the Q175 'knock-in' mouse...
September 16, 2016: Experimental Neurology
Maria Angeles Bonmati-Carrion, Konstanze Hild, Cheryl Isherwood, Stephen J Sweeney, Victoria L Revell, Debra J Skene, Maria Angeles Rol, Juan Antonio Madrid
Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs), whose photopigment melanopsin has a peak of sensitivity in the short wavelength range of the spectrum, constitute a common light input pathway to the olivary pretectal nucleus (OPN), the pupillary light reflex (PLR) regulatory centre, and to the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), the major pacemaker of the circadian system. Thus, evaluating PLR under short wavelength light (λmax ≤ 500 nm) and creating an integrated PLR parameter, as a possible tool to indirectly assess the status of the circadian system, becomes of interest...
2016: PloS One
Dayna A Johnson, Guido Simonelli, Kari Moore, Martha Billings, Mahasin S Mujahid, Michael Rueschman, Ichiro Kawachi, Susan Redline, Ana V Diez Roux, Sanjay R Patel
STUDY OBJECTIVES: To investigate cross-sectional associations of neighborhood social environment (social cohesion, safety) with objective measures of sleep duration, timing and disturbances. METHODS: A racially/ethnically diverse population of men and women (N=1949) aged 54-93 participating in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis Sleep and Neighborhood Ancillary studies. Participants underwent 1-week actigraphy between 2010 and 2013. Measures of sleep duration, timing and disruption were averaged over all days...
September 9, 2016: Sleep
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