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Disability accommodation

Alicia Dixon-Ibarra, Simon Driver, Haley VanVolkenburg, Kathleen Humphries
Physical inactivity and high rates of chronic conditions is a public health concern for adults with intellectual disability. Few health promotion programs target the group home setting which is the pre-dominant form of residential accommodation for persons with intellectual disability. A process evaluation of a physical activity health promotion program, Menu-Choice, was conducted with five group home sites for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Menu-Choice assists group home staff in including physical activity goals within resident schedules...
October 5, 2016: Evaluation and Program Planning
Lisa I Iezzoni
Erroneous assumptions among health care professionals about the daily lives, preferences, values, and expectations of persons with disability can contribute to documented health care disparities, faulty communication, and substandard quality of care affecting this heterogeneous population. Efforts to reduce racial and ethnic disparities have focused on expanding diversity in the physician workforce. Would expanding the numbers of physicians with disability benefit patients with disability? Increasing the number of physicians who identify as "disabled" is one strategy for proactively confronting disability-related barriers affecting patients, but such efforts will likely face substantial challenges...
October 1, 2016: AMA Journal of Ethics
Patricia M Davidson, Cynda Hylton Rushton, Jennifer Dotzenrod, Christina A Godack, Deborah Baker, Marie N Nolan
The Americans with Disabilities Act prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability and requires schools to provide reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities. The profession of nursing is striving for diversity and inclusion, but barriers still exist to realizing accommodations for people with disabilities. Promoting disclosure, a supportive and enabling environment, resilience, and realistic expectations are important considerations if we are to include among our ranks health professionals who can understand, based on similar life experiences of disability, a fuller range of perspectives of the patients we care for...
October 1, 2016: AMA Journal of Ethics
Leslie Francis, Anita Silvers
The meaning of "disability" has shifted with changes in public policy. Half a century ago, Congress was convinced that narrow determinations of disability are easy for physicians to make. But with the advent of universal civil rights protection against disability discrimination in the US, deciding whether particular individuals are disabled became increasingly contentious, until Congress intervened. What should now be addressed in each case is not whether the functionally compromised person is severely disabled enough to exercise a right, but whether mitigating interventions and reasonable accommodations can together achieve equitable access for that person...
October 1, 2016: AMA Journal of Ethics
Samuel R Bagenstos
This article will discuss the legal obligations of medical schools to accommodate applicants and students with disabilities. The article begins by describing the problem of denial of medical education to such students, a problem that results from both discrimination in admissions and denial of accommodations to incumbent students with disabilities. The article then discusses the disability rights legislation that prohibits discrimination against-and requires reasonable accommodation of-qualified medical students with disabilities...
October 1, 2016: AMA Journal of Ethics
Michael McKee, Ben Case, Maureen Fausone, Philip Zazove, Alicia Ouellette, Michael D Fetters
Students with sensory and physical disabilities are underrepresented in medical schools despite the availability of assistive technologies and accommodations. Unfortunately, many medical schools have adopted restrictive "organic" technical standards based on deficits rather than on the ability to do the work. Compelling ethical considerations of justice and beneficence should prompt change in this arena. Medical schools should instead embrace "functional" technical standards that permit accommodations for disabilities and update their admissions policies to promote applications from qualified students with disabilities...
October 1, 2016: AMA Journal of Ethics
Christine Bigby, Julie Beadle-Brown
BACKGROUND: The quality of life (QOL) of people with intellectual disability living in supported accommodation services is variable, influenced by many possible factors. Various frameworks have attempted to identify these factors without assigning value, direction of influence or relative impact on outcomes. METHODS: A realist review of the literature aimed to expose different propositions about variables influencing QOL outcomes and review the strength of supporting evidence for these, to identify their relative influence...
October 24, 2016: Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities: JARID
Roy McConkey, Fiona Keogh, Brendan Bunting, Edurne Garcia Iriarte
A natural experiment contrasted the self-rated well-being of people with intellectual disabilities (n = 75) and those with enduring mental health problems (n = 44) after they moved to new accommodation and support options, while others remained in congregated settings or living in the family home. Most support staff also provided well-being ratings. In personalized arrangements, personal well-being was significantly higher than in congregated settings; particularly for people with intellectual disability who had higher support needs compared to people with mental health problems...
October 24, 2016: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities: JOID
Susan Peters, Venerina Johnston, Sonia Hines, Mark Ross, Michel Coppieters
BACKGROUND: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common problem, that can be effectively managed by surgery. Screening for prognostic factors is important to identify workers who are at a greater risk of a poor work outcome in order to implement tailored interventions to facilitate their return-to-work. OBJECTIVE: To synthesize the best available evidence on the association of preoperative prognostic factors with work-related outcomes in people who have undergone carpal tunnel surgery...
September 2016: JBI Database of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports
Jack B Fu, Melissa P Osborn, Julie K Silver, Benedict S Konzen, An Ngo-Huang, Rajesh Yadav, Eduardo Bruera
Because of their expertise, physiatrists provide disability insurance assistance for cancer survivors. In this brief report, we perform a descriptive retrospective analysis of all new (354) outpatient physiatry consultations from January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2013, at a National Cancer Institute Comprehensive Cancer Center. Disability and/or work accommodations were brought up at some point with the physiatrist during the duration of their care for 131 (37%) of 354 patients. More than 90% of the discussions took place during the first visit...
October 6, 2016: American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
Barbara L Wilson, Richard J Butler, Matthew J Butler
PURPOSE: No studies quantify the labor market disparities between nurses with and without activity difficulties (physical impairment or disability). We explore disparate treatment of nurses with activity difficulties at three margins of the labor market: the ability to get a job, the relative wage rate offered once a nurse has a job, and the annual hours of work given that wage rate. DESIGN: Key variables from the American Community Survey (ACS) were analyzed, including basic demographic information, wages, hours of work, and employment status of registered nurses from 2006 to 2014...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Nursing Scholarship
Dianne Rios, Susan Magasi, Catherine Novak, Mark Harniss
People with disabilities are largely absent from mainstream health research. Exclusion of people with disabilities may be explicit, attributable to poorly justified exclusion criteria, or implicit, attributable to inaccessible study documents, interventions, or research measures. Meanwhile, people with disabilities experience poorer health, greater incidence of chronic conditions, and higher health care expenditure than people without disabilities. We outline our approach to "accessible research design"-research accessible to and inclusive of people with disabilities...
October 13, 2016: American Journal of Public Health
(no author information available yet)
BACKGROUND: Non-fatal outcomes of disease and injury increasingly detract from the ability of the world's population to live in full health, a trend largely attributable to an epidemiological transition in many countries from causes affecting children, to non-communicable diseases (NCDs) more common in adults. For the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2015 (GBD 2015), we estimated the incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for diseases and injuries at the global, regional, and national scale over the period of 1990 to 2015...
October 8, 2016: Lancet
Tara Joy Knibbe, Elaine Biddiss, Brenda Gladstone, Amy C McPherson
PURPOSE: To explore the experiences of young people with physical disabilities relating to social inclusion and physical activity, in order to describe the characteristics of social environments that support participation in physical activity. METHOD: An iterative, qualitative design employed in-depth, semi-structured interviews with young people with physical disabilities aged 12-18 (n = 11). Data were analyzed using interpretive thematic analysis. RESULTS: Young people described several ways that their social environments help motivate and support them in their physical activity participation...
August 11, 2016: Developmental Neurorehabilitation
Glenn S Pransky, Jean-Baptise Fassier, Elyssa Besen, Peter Blanck, Kerstin Ekberg, Michael Feuerstein, Fehmidah Munir
Introduction Many disability prevention strategies are focused on acute injuries and brief illness episodes, but there will be growing challenges for employers to manage circumstances of recurrent, chronic, or fluctuating symptoms in an aging workforce. The goal of this article is to summarize existing peer-review research in this area, compare this with employer discourse in the grey literature, and recommend future research priorities. Methods The authors participated in a year-long sponsored collaboration that ultimately led to an invited 3-day conference, "Improving Research of Employer Practices to Prevent Disability", held October 14-16, 2015, in Hopkinton, Massachusetts, USA...
October 4, 2016: Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation
Regina Schoenfeld-Tacher, Lori R Kogan
Given the unique nature of programs in professional veterinary medicine (PVM), the increasing numbers of students requesting accommodations for emotional support animals (ESAs) in higher education settings is of growing interest to student affairs and administrative staff in PVM settings. Since the legislation pertaining to this type of support animal differs from the laws governing disability service animals, colleges and universities now need to develop new policies and guidelines. Representatives from a sample of 28 PVM programs completed a survey about the prevalence of student requests for ESAs and service animals...
September 30, 2016: Journal of Veterinary Medical Education
Neelam Agarwal, Vinod Kumar
BACKGROUND: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) or Lupus is one of the leading causes of work disability in the United States, accounting for about 20% of the more than estimated 1.5 million Americans with a work disability. The symptoms of lupus can have a profound impact on the person's employment. Impacts of lupus are more pronounced among young and middle-adulthood. Studies have shown that loss in work hours cost the nation nearly $13 billion annually. The loss also impacts the individual's work, quality of life, self-management, and self-efficacy...
October 17, 2016: Work: a Journal of Prevention, Assessment, and Rehabilitation
Fran├žois Leroy, Alexis Ruet, Antoine Desvergee, Pamela Le Magnen, Jean Marie Durand
Disabled people see, as the general population, increased life expectancy. The advanced age of the disabled person is reflected by two characteristics: the occurrence of new disabilities related to age per se but also a possible increase of previous impairments. This summation of the effects must be known, recognized and anticipated. Following the work coordinated by Patrick Gohet, we investigated the responses to date on the following topics included in the national report: anticipation of the phenomenon, prevention of consequences, marking the onset of the effects of advanced age, accompanying the installation of the effects of this advanced age...
September 2016: Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
Kumiko Imahashi, Reiko Fukatsu, Yasoichi Nakajima, Megumi Nakamura, Tateo Ito, Mariko Horigome, Yuichiro Haruna, Tatsuya Noda, Yasuto Itoyama
A number of persons with an intractable disease (ID) experience work-related problems that could lead to job loss. The aim of this study was to ascertain perceptions regarding a range of work-related issues and corresponding support needs of individuals with an ID. Potential participants were people ages 15 to 64 with one of the 130 intractable chronic diseases designated in the Act to Comprehensively Support the Daily and Social Activities of Persons with Disabilities (Comprehensive Support for the Disabled Act)...
August 2016: Intractable & Rare Diseases Research
Karla K McGregor, Natalie Langenfeld, Sam Van Horne, Jacob Oleson, Matthew Anson, Wayne Jacobson
To explore the university experiences of students with learning disabilities (LD), 63,802 responses to the 2014 Student Experience in the Research University Survey were analyzed. Compared to other students, those with self-reported LD (5.96%) had difficulty with assignments and had more obstacles caused by non-academic responsibilities and imposed by their skill levels. Students with self-reported LD sensed more bias towards people with disabilities on campus, and they were less satisfied with their overall experience...
May 2016: Learning Disabilities Research & Practice
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