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bacterial arthritis

Murali K Kolikonda, Priyanga Jayakumar, Srividya Sriramula, Steven Lippmann
A common inhabitant of skin, the Kocuria kristinae of the Micrococcaceae family, has gained attention in recent years because it can induce pathology in humans. Reported is a Kocuria kristinae-caused abdominal abscess in a patient treated for rheumatoid arthritis with adalimumab. The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor drugs are known to cause various bacterial, viral, and fungal infections. This is the first known case where an opportunistic infection with Kocuria has presented with an abdominal abscess in an immunocompromised individual who is on long term TNF inhibitors...
October 18, 2016: Postgraduate Medicine
Seong-Tshool Hong
The human intestine contains a massive and complex microbial community called gut microbiota. A typical human carries 100 trillion microbes in his/her body which is 10 times greater than the number of their host cells, i.e. whole number of human cells. A combined microbial genome constituting gut microbiota is well excess our own human genome. The microbial composition of gut microbiotata and its role on diseases became a booming area of research, presenting a new paradigm of opportunities for modern medicines...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Sanka Amadoru, Kwang Lim, Mark Tacey, Craig Aboltins
AIMS: To explore differences in presentation and outcomes between younger and older patients with bacterial spinal infections. METHODS: Clinical, microbiological and radiological information was collected for patients at a single metropolitan hospital with spinal infections (spondylodiscitis, vertebral osteomyelitis, septic discitis, facet joint septic arthritis, and spinal epidural abscess) between January 2008 and January 2015. Patients were excluded if under 18 years of age, or if clinical and imaging findings were inconsistent with the diagnosis...
October 18, 2016: Internal Medicine Journal
Michael P Palmer, Rachael Melton-Kreft, Laura Nistico, N Louisa Hiller, Leon H J Kim, Gregory T Altman, Daniel T Altman, Nicholas G Sotereanos, Fen Z Hu, Patrick J De Meo, Garth D Ehrlich
BACKGROUND: Preliminary studies have identified known bacterial pathogens in the knees of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) before arthroplasty. AIMS: The current study was designed to determine the incidence and types of bacteria present in the synovial fluid of native knee joints from adult patients with diagnoses of septic arthritis and OA. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients were enrolled between October 2010 and January 2013. Synovial fluid samples from the affected knee were collected and evaluated with both traditional microbial culture and polymerase chain reaction-electrospray ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (molecular diagnostics [MDx]) to prospectively characterize the microbial content...
October 17, 2016: Genetic Testing and Molecular Biomarkers
Cyril Garrouste, Dany Anglicheau, Nassim Kamar, Claire Bachelier, Joseph Rivalan, Bruno Pereira, Sophie Caillard, Julien Aniort, Philippe Gatault, Martin Soubrier, Johnny Sayegh, Charlotte Colosio, Anthony Buisson, Eric Thervet, Nicolas Bouvier, Anne Elisabeth Heng
Anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) therapy has improved the prognosis of many chronic inflammatory diseases. It appears to be well-tolerated by liver-transplant patients. However, their use and their safety in kidney-transplant patients have yet to be determined.In this retrospective study, we identified 16 adult kidney-transplant patients aged 46.5 years (34-51.8) who received anti-TNFα therapy from 7 kidney transplantation centers. The indications for this treatment included: chronic inflammatory bowel disease (n = 8), inflammatory arthritis (n = 5), AA amyloidosis (n = 1), psoriasis (n = 1), and microscopic polyangiitis (n = 1)...
October 2016: Medicine (Baltimore)
A Schnabel, U Range, G Hahn, T Siepmann, R Berner, C M Hedrich
Historically, osteomyelitis was considered an infectious disorder. More recently, inflammatory mechanisms were recognized causing a significant proportion of pediatric osteomyelitis. This study was to compare characteristics of children with chronic non-bacterial (CNO) and bacterial osteomyelitis (BOM). A chart review of osteomyelitis patients from the departments of pediatrics, pediatric surgery, orthopedic surgery, and oral and maxillofacial surgery was conducted in a tertiary referral center, covering the years 2004-2014...
October 11, 2016: Rheumatology International
J Levorova, V Machon, A Guha, R Foltan
Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is an unusual disease in adults. Inoculation of the pathogen may occur through traumatic or iatrogenic injuries, or more often by haematogenous spread from a distant focus. The cause of infection is unknown in most cases. A case of ostensibly mild septic arthritis of the TMJ with a good response to antibiotic therapy and lavage, but that finally led to fatal destruction of the joint structures in a 38-year-old female patient, is reported herein. The infection was caused by Raoultella ornithinolytica - a rare bacterial species in humans, which has not been reported previously in any patients with joint problems...
October 7, 2016: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Tim Stobernack, Corinna Glasner, Sabryna Junker, Giorgio Gabarrini, Menke de Smit, Anne de Jong, Andreas Otto, Dörte Becher, Arie Jan van Winkelhoff, Jan Maarten van Dijl
Porphyromonas gingivalis is an oral pathogen associated with the inflammatory disease periodontitis. Periodontitis and P. gingivalis¬ have been associated with rheumatoid arthritis. One of the hallmarks of rheumatoid arthritis is the loss of tolerance against citrullinated proteins. Citrullination is a post-translational modification of arginine residues, leading to a change in structure and function of the respective protein. This modification, which is catalysed by peptidylarginine deiminases (PAD), plays a role in several physiological processes in the human body...
October 7, 2016: Journal of Proteome Research
F Jasmijn Smits, Herman Frima, Christoph Schaeffeler, Christoph Sommer
Septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis is a potentially severe disease. Athletes are at risk of this form of spontaneous arthritis, as inflammation of the pubic bone due to muscular stress is relatively common. Oedema due to inflammation might predispose to infection through bacteraemia or local bacterial translocation. Suspicion should be raised when an athlete complains of groin pain and has signs of infection (i.e., fever, elevated white blood cell count, and elevated C-reactive protein). Diagnosis is made by imaging showing signs of inflammation combined with positive (blood) cultures...
2016: Case Reports in Surgery
Hana Čipčić Paljetak, Linda Tomašković, Mario Matijašić, Mirjana Bukvić, Andrea Fajdetić, Donatella Verbanac, Mihaela Perića
5-LOX - 5-lipoxygenase; ACT - artemisinin-based combination therapies; ADME - absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion; BAL - broncho alveolar lavage; CABP - community acquired bacterial pneumonia; cAMP - cyclic adenosine monophosphate; CAP - community-acquired pneumonia; CF - cystic fibrosis, BOS bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome; cGMP - cyclic guanosine monophosphate; COPD - chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; COX - cyclooxygenase; DPB - diffuse panbronchiolitis; HDACs - histone deacetylases; IBD - inflammatory bowel disease; IL-1p - interleukin 1p; IL-6 - interleukin 6; MIC - minimal inhibitory concentrations; MLSB - macrolide, lincosamide, streptogramin B; NSAIDs - non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; OVA - ovalbumin; PDE4 - phosphodiesterase 4; PMA - phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate; RA - rheumatoid arthritis; RTI - respiratory tract infections; SAHA - suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid; SAR - structure-activity-relationship; Th1 - type 1 helper T-cell; TNBS - trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid; TNF-α - tumour necrosis factor α; UN - United Nations, WHO - World Health Organisation...
September 27, 2016: Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry
Henning Zeidler, Alan P Hudson
Reactive (inflammatory) arthritis has been known for many years to follow genital infection with the intracellular bacterial pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis in some individuals. Recent studies from several groups have demonstrated that a related bacterium, the respiratory pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae, can elicit a similar arthritis. Studies of these organisms, and of a set of gastrointestinal pathogens also associated with engendering inflammatory arthritis, have been relatively extensive. However, reports focusing on coinfections with these and/or other organisms, and the effects of such coinfections on the host immune and other systems, have been rare...
August 24, 2016: Microorganisms
Tas Tugba, Baltaci Neslihan, Yilmaz A Esra, Yuksel C Nuket, Eminoglu Sancar
Reactive arthritis is defined as arthritis that occurs during or after an extraarticular infection. It is mostly difficult to determine the causative agent that causes inflammation in the joints. Initially, salmonella, shigella, chlamydiaand yersinia were considered to be pathogenic agents. But recently, in addition to demonstrated viral and bacterial agents, there are also other cases of reactive arthritis after vaccinations with Rubella and Influenza. Herein a 3-year old boy is reported with reactive arthritis of left knee that developed shortly after hand-foot and mouth disease...
September 2016: Journal of the College of Physicians and Surgeons—Pakistan: JCPSP
Hongjun Zhao, Lijuan Zhao, Wei Shi, Hui Luo, Liping Duan, Yunhui You, Yisha Li, Xiaoxia Zuo
INTRODUCTION: Bowel-associated dermatosis-arthritis syndrome is rare systemic diseases characterized by a prodrome of fever, chills, and influenza-like symptoms with subsequent skin eruptions, myalgias, and polyarthralgias. It is reported to be occurred in Intestinal bypass surgery and inflammatory bowel disease. CASE DESCRIPTION: Herein, we described a 29-years-old man with Bowel-associated dermatosis-arthritis syndrome. He had no history of gastrointestinal surgery and inflammatory bowel disease...
2016: SpringerPlus
Mario Abinun, Jonathan P Lane, Mark Wood, Mark Friswell, Terence J Flood, Helen E Foster
Severe infections are emerging as major risk factors for death among children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). In particular, children with refractory JIA treated with long-term, multiple, and often combined immunosuppressive and antiinflammatory agents, including the new biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), are at increased risk for severe infections and death. We investigated 4 persons with JIA who died during 1994-2013, three of overwhelming central venous catheter-related bacterial sepsis caused by coagulase-negative Staphylococus or α-hemolytic Streptococcus infection and 1 of disseminated adenovirus and Epstein-Barr virus infection)...
October 2016: Emerging Infectious Diseases
Seong-Tshool Hong
The human intestine contains a massive and complex microbial community called gut microbiota. A typical human carries 100 trillion microbes in his/her body which is 10 times greater than the number of their host cells, i.e. whole number of human cells. A combined microbial genome constituting gut microbiota is well excess our own human genome. The microbial composition of gut microbiotata and its role on diseases became a booming area of research, presenting a new paradigm of opportunities for modern medicines...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
James T Rosenbaum, Mark J Asquith
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The microbiome is the term that describes the microbial ecosystem that cohabits an organism such as humans. The microbiome has been implicated in a long list of immune-mediated diseases which include rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and even gout. The mechanisms to account for this effect are multiple. The clinical implications from observations on the microbiome and disease are broad. RECENT FINDINGS: A growing number of microbiota constituents such as Prevotella copri, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Collinsella have been correlated or causally related to rheumatic disease...
October 2016: Current Rheumatology Reports
Seyed Bahman Momen, Seyed Davar Siadat, Neda Akbari, Bijan Ranjbar, Khosro Khajeh
BACKGROUND: Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) is the leading cause of bacterial meningitis, otitis media, pneumonia, cellulitis, bacteremia, and septic arthritis in infants and young children. The Hib capsule contains the major virulence factor, and is composed of polyribosyl ribitol phosphate (PRP) that can induce immune system response. Vaccines consisting of Hib capsular polysaccharide (PRP) conjugated to a carrier protein are effective in the prevention of the infections. However, due to costly processes in PRP production, these vaccines are too expensive...
June 2016: Jundishapur Journal of Microbiology
Elena Chiappini, Maria Vincenza Mastrolia, Luisa Galli, Maurizio De Martino, Simone Lazzeri
Septic arthritis (SA) is an orthopedic emergency in childhood. It is uncommon in high resource settings. However, an incidence of 5-20 per 100,000 children has been reported in low-income countries. Area covered: The predictive value of serum markers is still under debate and the proposed diagnostic algorithms for SA are not sufficiently validated in children. Recent data suggest that short-course intravenous treatment, followed by oral therapy, is as effective as traditional long-term treatment. Results from three randomized controlled trials suggest that the addition of systemic steroids may accelerate clinical improvement...
November 2016: Expert Review of Anti-infective Therapy
Evelyn Walker, Cecily Moore, Patrick Shearer, Martina Jelocnik, Sankhya Bommana, Peter Timms, Adam Polkinghorne
BACKGROUND: Arthritis is an economically significant disease in lambs and is usually the result of a bacterial infection. One of the known agents of this disease is Chlamydia pecorum, a globally recognised livestock pathogen associated with several diseases in sheep, cattle and other hosts. Relatively little published information is available on the clinical, diagnostic and pathologic features of C. pecorum arthritis in sheep, hindering efforts to enhance our understanding of this economically significant disease...
2016: BMC Veterinary Research
Anne Brinster, Xavier Guillot, Clément Prati, Daniel Wendling
: Reactive arthritis (ReA) is sterile arthritis occurring after extra articular bacterial infection. The aim of this study was to analyze, over 30 years, clinical, biological and imaging characteristics as well as therapeutic management of new cases of ReA, comparing two periods. METHODS: retrospective monocentric study, data of all the patients followed in our unit between January 1st 1984 and April 2014 with the diagnosis or ReA were analyzed (clinical and biological features, management and outcome), and compared between two periods: from January 1984 to December 1993, and from January 2004 to December 2013...
September 3, 2016: Reumatología Clinica
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