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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28078312/biallelic-scn10a-mutations-in-neuromuscular-disease-and-epileptic-encephalopathy
#1
Marios Kambouris, Julien Thevenon, Ariane Soldatos, Allison Cox, Joshi Stephen, Tawfeg Ben-Omran, Yasser Al-Sarraj, Hala Boulos, William Bone, James C Mullikin, Alice Masurel-Paulet, Judith St-Onge, Yannis Dufford, Corrine Chantegret, Christel Thauvin-Robinet, Jamil Al-Alami, Laurence Faivre, Jean Baptiste Riviere, William A Gahl, Alexander G Bassuk, May Christine V Malicdan, Hatem El-Shanti
OBJECTIVES: Two consanguineous families, one of Sudanese ethnicity presenting progressive neuromuscular disease, severe cognitive impairment, muscle weakness, upper motor neuron lesion, anhydrosis, facial dysmorphism, and recurrent seizures and the other of Egyptian ethnicity presenting with neonatal hypotonia, bradycardia, and recurrent seizures, were evaluated for the causative gene mutation. METHODS AND RESULTS: Homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing (WES) identified damaging homozygous variants in SCN10A, namely c...
January 2017: Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28068486/the-changing-epidemiology-of-autism-spectrum-disorders
#2
Kristen Lyall, Lisa Croen, Julie Daniels, M Daniele Fallin, Christine Ladd-Acosta, Brian K Lee, Bo Y Park, Nathaniel W Snyder, Diana Schendel, Heather E Volk, Gayle C Windham, Craig Newschaffer
Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex neurodevelopmental condition with lifelong impacts. Genetic and environmental factors contribute to ASD etiology, which remains incompletely understood. Research on ASD epidemiology has made significant advances in the past decade. Current prevalence is estimated to be at least 1.5% in developed countries, with recent increases primarily among those without comorbid intellectual disability. Genetic studies have identified a number of rare de novo mutations and gained footing in the areas of polygenic risk, epigenetics, and gene-by-environment interaction...
December 21, 2016: Annual Review of Public Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28065824/variable-white-matter-atrophy-and-intellectual-development-in-a-family-with-x-linked-creatine-transporter-deficiency-despite-genotypic-homogeneity
#3
Nicole Heussinger, Marc Saake, Angelika Mennecke, Helmuth-Günther Dörr, Regina Trollmann
BACKGROUND: The X-linked creatine transporter deficiency (CRTD) caused by an SLC6A8 mutation represents the second most common cause of X-linked intellectual disability. The clinical phenotype ranges from mild to severe intellectual disability, epilepsy, short stature, poor language skills, and autism spectrum disorders. The objective of this study was to investigate phenotypic variability in the context of genotype, cerebral creatine concentration, and volumetric analysis in a family with CRTD...
October 17, 2016: Pediatric Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28064060/a-current-view-on-contactin-4-5-and-6-implications-in-neurodevelopmental-disorders
#4
REVIEW
Oguro-Ando Asami, Amila Zuko, Kristel T E Kleijer, J Peter H Burbach
Contactins (Cntns) are a six-member subgroup of the immunoglobulin cell adhesion molecule superfamily (IgCAMs) with pronounced brain expression and function. Recent genetic studies of neuropsychiatric disorders have pinpointed contactin-4 (CNTN4), contactin-5 (CNTN5) and contactin-6 (CNTN6) as candidate genes in neurodevelopmental disorders, particularly in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), but also in intellectual disability, schizophrenia (SCZ), attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), bipolar disorder (BD), alcohol use disorder (AUD) and anorexia nervosa (AN)...
January 4, 2017: Molecular and Cellular Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28063882/mice-lacking-grip1-2-show-increased-social-interactions-and-enhanced-phosphorylation-at-glua2-s880
#5
Mei Han, Rebeca Mejias, Shu-Ling Chiu, Rebecca Rose, Abby Adamczyk, Richard Huganir, Tao Wang
Glutamate receptor interacting proteins 1 and 2 (GRIP1/2) play an important role in regulating synaptic trafficking of AMPA receptor 2/3 (GluA2/3) and synaptic strength. Gain-of-function GRIP1 mutations are implicated in social behavioral deficits in autism. To study mechanisms of Grip1/2-mediated AMPA signaling in the regulation of social behaviors, we performed social behavioral testing on neuron-specific Grip1/2-double knockout (DKO) and wild type (WT) mice that are matched for age, sex, and strain background...
January 4, 2017: Behavioural Brain Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28057753/a-novel-kleefstra-syndrome-associated-variant-that-affects-the-conserved-tplx-motif-within-the-ankyrin-repeat-of-ehmt1-leads-to-abnormal-protein-folding
#6
Patrick R Blackburn, Alexander Tischer, Michael T Zimmermann, Jennifer L Kemppainen, Sujatha Sastry, Amy E Knight Johnson, Margot A Cousin, Nicole J Boczek, Gavin Oliver, Vinod K Misra, Ralitza H Gavrilova, Gwen A Lomberk, Matthew Auton, Raul A Urrutia, Eric W Klee
Kleefstra syndrome (KS) (MIM# 610253), also known as 9q34 deletion syndrome, is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by haploinsufficiency of euchromatic histone methyltransferase-1 (EHMT1). The clinical phenotype of KS includes moderate to severe intellectual disability with absent speech, hypotonia, brachycephaly, congenital heart defects, and dysmorphic facial features with hypertelorism, synophrys, macroglossia, protruding tongue, and prognathism. Only a few cases of de novo missense mutations in EHMT1 giving rise to KS have been described...
January 5, 2017: Journal of Biological Chemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28057268/control-of-neuronal-development-by-t-box-genes-in-the-brain
#7
A B Mihalas, R F Hevner
T-box transcription factors play key roles in the regulation of developmental processes such as cell differentiation and migration. Mammals have 17 T-box genes, of which several regulate brain development. The Tbr1 subfamily of T-box genes is particularly important in development of the cerebral cortex, olfactory bulbs (OBs), and cerebellum. This subfamily is comprised of Tbr1, Tbr2 (also known as Eomes), and Tbx21. In developing cerebral cortex, Tbr2 and Tbr1 are expressed during successive stages of differentiation in the pyramidal neuron lineage, from Tbr2+ intermediate progenitors to Tbr1+ postmitotic glutamatergic neurons...
2017: Current Topics in Developmental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28053551/genetics-of-tuberous-sclerosis-complex-implications-for-clinical-practice
#8
REVIEW
Carolina Caban, Nubaira Khan, Daphne M Hasbani, Peter B Crino
Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a multisystem disorder that results from heterozygous mutations in either TSC1 or TSC2. The primary organ systems that are affected include the brain, skin, lung, kidney, and heart, all with variable frequency, penetrance, and severity. Neurological features include epilepsy, autism, and intellectual disability. There are more than 1,500 known pathogenic variants for TSC1 and TSC2, including deletion, nonsense, and missense mutations, and all pathogenic mutations are inactivating, leading to loss of function effects on the encoded proteins TSC1 and TSC2...
2017: Application of Clinical Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28042670/the-genetic-basis-of-cerebral-palsy
#9
REVIEW
Michael C Fahey, Alastair H Maclennan, Doris Kretzschmar, Jozef Gecz, Michael C Kruer
Although prematurity and hypoxic-ischaemic injury are well-recognized contributors to the pathogenesis of cerebral palsy (CP), as many as one-third of children with CP may lack traditional risk factors. For many of these children, a genetic basis to their condition is suspected. Recent findings have implicated copy number variants and mutations in single genes in children with CP. Current studies are limited by relatively small patient numbers, the underlying genetic heterogeneity identified, and the paucity of validation studies that have been performed...
January 1, 2017: Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28039324/topoisomerase-3%C3%AE-is-the-major-topoisomerase-for-mrnas-and-linked-to-neurodevelopment-and-mental-dysfunction
#10
Muzammil Ahmad, Weiping Shen, Wen Li, Yutong Xue, Sige Zou, Dongyi Xu, Weidong Wang
Human cells contain five topoisomerases in the nucleus and cytoplasm, but which one is the major topoisomerase for mRNAs is unclear. To date, Top3β is the only known topoisomerase that possesses RNA topoisomerase activity, binds mRNA translation machinery and interacts with an RNA-binding protein, FMRP, to promote synapse formation; and Top3β gene deletion has been linked to schizophrenia. Here, we show that Top3β is also the most abundant mRNA-binding topoisomerase in cells. Top3β, but not other topoisomerases, contains a distinctive RNA-binding domain; and deletion of this domain diminishes the amount of Top3β that associates with mRNAs, indicating that Top3β is specifically targeted to mRNAs by its RNA binding domain...
December 29, 2016: Nucleic Acids Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28030860/transcriptional-gene-silencing-of-the-autism-associated-long-noncoding-rna-msnp1as-in-human-neural-progenitor-cells
#11
Jessica J DeWitt, Patrick M Hecht, Nicole Grepo, Brent Wilkinson, Oleg V Evgrafov, Kevin V Morris, James A Knowles, Daniel B Campbell
The long noncoding RNA MSNP1AS (moesin pseudogene 1, antisense) is a functional element that was previously associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) with genome-wide significance. Expression of MSNP1AS was increased 12-fold in the cerebral cortex of individuals with ASD and 22-fold in individuals with a genome-wide significantly associated ASD genetic marker on chromosome 5p14.1. Overexpression of MSNP1AS in human neuronal cells caused decreased expression of moesin protein, which is involved in neuronal process stability...
December 29, 2016: Developmental Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28025742/loss-of-function-of-ptpr-%C3%AE-and-%C3%AE-observed-in-sporadic-schizophrenia-causes-brain-region-specific-deregulation-of-monoamine-levels-and-altered-behavior-in-mice
#12
Arnaud Cressant, Veronique Dubreuil, Jing Kong, Thorsten Manfred Kranz, Francoise Lazarini, Jean-Marie Launay, Jacques Callebert, Jan Sap, Dolores Malaspina, Sylvie Granon, Sheila Harroch
RATIONALE: The receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPRG has been genetically associated with psychiatric disorders and is a ligand for members of the contactin family, which are themselves linked to autism spectrum disorders. OBJECTIVE: Based on our finding of a phosphatase-null de novo mutation in PTPRG associated with a case of sporadic schizophrenia, we used PTPRG knockout (KO) mice to model the effect of a loss-of-function mutation. We compared the results with loss-of-function in its close paralogue PTPRZ, previously associated with schizophrenia...
December 26, 2016: Psychopharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28009282/beyond-epilepsy-and-autism-disruption-of-gabrb3-causes-ocular-hypopigmentation
#13
Ryan J Delahanty, Yanfeng Zhang, Terry Jo Bichell, Wangzhen Shen, Kelienne Verdier, Robert L Macdonald, Lili Xu, Kelli Boyd, Janice Williams, Jing-Qiong Kang
Reduced ocular pigmentation is common in Angelman syndrome (AS) and Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and is long thought to be caused by OCA2 deletion. GABRB3 is located in the 15q11-13 region flanked by UBE3A, GABRA5, GABRG3, and OCA2. Mutations in GABRB3 have frequently been associated with epilepsy and autism, consistent with its role in neurodevelopment. We report here a robust phenotype in the mouse in which deletion of Gabrb3 alone causes nearly complete loss of retinal pigmentation due to atrophied melanosomes, as evidenced by electron microscopy...
December 20, 2016: Cell Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27976757/efficient-and-versatile-crispr-engineering-of-human-neurons-in-culture-to-model-neurological-disorders
#14
Ruth R Shah, Justyna Cholewa-Waclaw, Faith C J Davies, Katie M Paton, Ronan Chaligne, Edith Heard, Catherine M Abbott, Adrian P Bird
The recent identification of multiple new genetic causes of neurological disorders highlights the need for model systems that give experimental access to the underlying biology. In particular, the ability to couple disease-causing mutations with human neuronal differentiation systems would be beneficial. Gene targeting is a well-known approach for dissecting gene function, but low rates of homologous recombination in somatic cells (including neuronal cells) have traditionally impeded the development of robust cellular models of neurological disorders...
November 15, 2016: Wellcome Open Res
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27965028/two-de-novo-mutations-in-an-autistic-child-who-had-previously-undergone-transplantation-for-dilated-cardiomyopathy-the-importance-of-keeping-an-open-mind
#15
Umair Sajid, Bob Argiropoulos, Xing-Chang Wei, Jillian S Parboosingh, Ryan E Lamont, Aneal Khan, Steven C Greenway
We report the finding of 2 de novo mutations in an 8-year-old boy with developmental delay and autism who underwent heart transplantation at 1 year of age for idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. We identified a de novo microdeletion at chromosome 2p16.3 involving the neurexin-1 (NRXN1) gene and a de novo pathologic variant (Pro838Leu) in the myosin heavy chain 7 (MYH7) gene. This case emphasizes the importance of comprehensive genetic evaluation in patients with cardiomyopathy, particularly if they have extracardiac abnormalities, and the necessity of interpreting variants with attention to the phenotype...
September 26, 2016: Canadian Journal of Cardiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27957526/mammalian-fmrp-s499-is-phosphorylated-by-ck2-and-promotes-secondary-phosphorylation-of-fmrp
#16
Christopher M Bartley, Rachel A O'Keefe, Anna Blice-Baum, Mihaela-Rita Mihailescu, Xuan Gong, Laura Miyares, Esra Karaca, Angélique Bordey
The fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is an mRNA-binding regulator of protein translation that associates with 4-6% of brain transcripts and is central to neurodevelopment. Autism risk genes' transcripts are overrepresented among FMRP-binding mRNAs, and FMRP loss-of-function mutations are responsible for fragile X syndrome, the most common cause of monogenetic autism. It is thought that FMRP-dependent translational repression is governed by the phosphorylation of serine residue 499 (S499). However, recent evidence suggests that S499 phosphorylation is not modulated by metabotropic glutamate receptor class I (mGluR-I) or protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), two molecules shown to regulate FMRP translational repression...
November 2016: ENeuro
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27956632/increased-burden-of-deleterious-variants-in-essential-genes-in-autism-spectrum-disorder
#17
Xiao Ji, Rachel L Kember, Christopher D Brown, Maja Bućan
Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a heterogeneous, highly heritable neurodevelopmental syndrome characterized by impaired social interaction, communication, and repetitive behavior. It is estimated that hundreds of genes contribute to ASD. We asked if genes with a strong effect on survival and fitness contribute to ASD risk. Human orthologs of genes with an essential role in pre- and postnatal development in the mouse [essential genes (EGs)] are enriched for disease genes and under strong purifying selection relative to human orthologs of mouse genes with a known nonlethal phenotype [nonessential genes (NEGs)]...
December 27, 2016: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27912058/impaired-amino-acid-transport-at-the-blood-brain-barrier-is-a-cause-of-autism-spectrum-disorder
#18
Dora C Tărlungeanu, Elena Deliu, Christoph P Dotter, Majdi Kara, Philipp Christoph Janiesch, Mariafrancesca Scalise, Michele Galluccio, Mateja Tesulov, Emanuela Morelli, Fatma Mujgan Sonmez, Kaya Bilguvar, Ryuichi Ohgaki, Yoshikatsu Kanai, Anide Johansen, Seham Esharif, Tawfeg Ben-Omran, Meral Topcu, Avner Schlessinger, Cesare Indiveri, Kent E Duncan, Ahmet Okay Caglayan, Murat Gunel, Joseph G Gleeson, Gaia Novarino
Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a group of genetic disorders often overlapping with other neurological conditions. We previously described abnormalities in the branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) catabolic pathway as a cause of ASD. Here, we show that the solute carrier transporter 7a5 (SLC7A5), a large neutral amino acid transporter localized at the blood brain barrier (BBB), has an essential role in maintaining normal levels of brain BCAAs. In mice, deletion of Slc7a5 from the endothelial cells of the BBB leads to atypical brain amino acid profile, abnormal mRNA translation, and severe neurological abnormalities...
December 1, 2016: Cell
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27911742/current-perspectives-in-autism-spectrum-disorder-from-genes-to-therapy
#19
Maria Chahrour, Brian J O'Roak, Emanuela Santini, Rodney C Samaco, Robin J Kleiman, M Chiara Manzini
Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a constellation of neurodevelopmental presentations with high heritability and both phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity. To date, mutations in hundreds of genes have been associated to varying degrees with increased ASD risk. A better understanding of the functions of these genes and whether they fit together in functional groups or impact similar neuronal circuits is needed to develop rational treatment strategies. We will review current areas of emphasis in ASD research, starting from human genetics and exploring how mouse models of human mutations have helped identify specific molecular pathways (protein synthesis and degradation, chromatin remodeling, intracellular signaling), which are linked to alterations in circuit function and cognitive/social behavior...
November 9, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27909399/a-subset-of-autism-associated-genes-regulate-the-structural-stability-of-neurons
#20
REVIEW
Yu-Chih Lin, Jeannine A Frei, Michaela B C Kilander, Wenjuan Shen, Gene J Blatt
Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) comprises a range of neurological conditions that affect individuals' ability to communicate and interact with others. People with ASD often exhibit marked qualitative difficulties in social interaction, communication, and behavior. Alterations in neurite arborization and dendritic spine morphology, including size, shape, and number, are hallmarks of almost all neurological conditions, including ASD. As experimental evidence emerges in recent years, it becomes clear that although there is broad heterogeneity of identified autism risk genes, many of them converge into similar cellular pathways, including those regulating neurite outgrowth, synapse formation and spine stability, and synaptic plasticity...
2016: Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience
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