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autism mutation

Matthew J Gazzellone, Mehdi Zarrei, Christie L Burton, Susan Walker, Mohammed Uddin, S M Shaheen, Julie Coste, Rageen Rajendram, Reva J Schachter, Marlena Colasanto, Gregory L Hanna, David R Rosenberg, Noam Soreni, Kate D Fitzgerald, Christian R Marshall, Janet A Buchanan, Daniele Merico, Paul D Arnold, Stephen W Scherer
BACKGROUND: Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a heterogeneous neuropsychiatric condition, thought to have a significant genetic component. When onset occurs in childhood, affected individuals generally exhibit different characteristics from adult-onset OCD, including higher prevalence in males and increased heritability. Since neuropsychiatric conditions are associated with copy number variations (CNVs), we considered their potential role in the etiology of OCD. METHODS: We genotyped 307 unrelated pediatric probands with idiopathic OCD (including 174 that were part of complete parent-child trios) and compared their genotypes with those of 3861 population controls, to identify rare CNVs (<0...
2016: Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders
Hilde de Kluiver, Jacobine E Buizer-Voskamp, Conor V Dolan, Dorret I Boomsma
We review the hypotheses concerning the association between the paternal age at childbearing and childhood psychiatric disorders (autism spectrum- and attention deficit/hyperactive disorder) and adult disorders (schizophrenia, bipolar-, obsessive-compulsive-, and major depressive disorder) based on epidemiological studies. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the paternal age effect. We discuss the four main-not mutually exclusive-hypotheses. These are the de novo mutation hypothesis, the hypothesis concerning epigenetic alterations, the selection into late fatherhood hypothesis, and the environmental resource hypothesis...
October 22, 2016: American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part B, Neuropsychiatric Genetics
Marijn Bart Martens, Monica Frega, Jessica Classen, Lisa Epping, Elske Bijvank, Marco Benevento, Hans van Bokhoven, Paul Tiesinga, Dirk Schubert, Nael Nadif Kasri
Heterozygous mutations or deletions in the human Euchromatin histone methyltransferase 1 (EHMT1) gene cause Kleefstra syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disorder that is characterized by autistic-like features and severe intellectual disability (ID). Neurodevelopmental disorders including ID and autism may be related to deficits in activity-dependent wiring of brain circuits during development. Although Kleefstra syndrome has been associated with dendritic and synaptic defects in mice and Drosophila, little is known about the role of EHMT1 in the development of cortical neuronal networks...
October 21, 2016: Scientific Reports
Stephanie M Morris, Maria T Acosta, Shruti Garg, Jonathan Green, Susan Huson, Eric Legius, Kathryn N North, Jonathan M Payne, Ellen Plasschaert, Thomas W Frazier, Lauren A Weiss, Yi Zhang, David H Gutmann, John N Constantino
Importance: Recent reports have demonstrated a higher incidence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and substantially elevated autistic trait burden in individuals with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). However, important discrepancies regarding the distribution of autistic traits, sex predominance, and association between ASD symptoms and attentional problems have emerged, and critical features of the ASD phenotype within NF1 have never been adequately explored. Establishing NF1 as a monogenic cause for ASD has important implications for affected patients and for future research focused on establishing convergent pathogenic mechanisms relevant to the potential treatment targets for ASD...
October 19, 2016: JAMA Psychiatry
Indhu-Shree Rajan-Babu, Samuel S Chong
Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common monogenic cause of intellectual disability and autism. Molecular diagnostic testing of FXS and related disorders (fragile X-associated primary ovarian insufficiency (FXPOI) and fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS)) relies on a combination of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot (SB) for the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) CGG-repeat expansion and methylation analyses. Recent advancements in PCR-based technologies have enabled the characterization of the complete spectrum of CGG-repeat mutation, with or without methylation assessment, and, as a result, have reduced our reliance on the labor- and time-intensive SB, which is the gold standard FXS diagnostic test...
October 14, 2016: Genes
Deeba Noreen Baig, Toru Yanagawa, Katsuhiko Tabuchi
Synaptic cell adhesion molecules (SCAMs) are a functional category of cell adhesion molecules that connect pre- and postsynapses by the protein-protein interaction via their extracellular cell adhesion domains. Countless numbers of common genetic variants and rare mutations in SCAMs have been identified in the patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Among these, NRXN and NLGN family proteins cooperatively function at synaptic terminals both of which genes are strongly implicated as risk genes for ASDs...
October 12, 2016: Brain Research Bulletin
B Zhang, E Seigneur, P Wei, O Gokce, J Morgan, T C Südhof
Neuroligins are postsynaptic cell-adhesion molecules that bind to presynaptic neurexins. Mutations in neuroligin-3 predispose to autism, but how such mutations affect synaptic function remains incompletely understood. Here we systematically examined the effect of three autism-associated mutations, the neuroligin-3 knockout, the R451C knockin, and the R704C knockin, on synaptic transmission in the calyx of Held, a central synapse ideally suited for high-resolution analyses of synaptic transmission. Surprisingly, germline knockout of neuroligin-3 did not alter synaptic transmission, whereas the neuroligin-3 R451C and R704C knockins decreased and increased, respectively, synaptic transmission...
October 11, 2016: Molecular Psychiatry
Yuko Fukata, Norihiko Yokoi, Yuri Miyazaki, Masaki Fukata
Physiological functioning of the brain requires fine-tuned synaptic transmission, and its dysfunction causes various brain disorders such as autism, dementia, and epilepsy. It is therefore extremely important to identify and characterize key regulators of synaptic function. In particular, disease-related synaptic proteins, such as autism-related neurexin-neuroligin and psychiatric disorder-related NMDA receptor, have attracted considerable attention. Recent basic and clinical research has highlighted critical roles of a ligand-receptor complex, LGI1-ADAM22, in synaptic transmission and brain function, as mutations in the LGI1 gene cause autosomal dominant lateral temporal lobe epilepsy and autoantibodies to LGI1 cause limbic encephalitis which is characterized by memory loss and seizures...
October 4, 2016: Neuroscience Research
Yifan Zhou, Daman Kumari, Nicholas Sciascia, Karen Usdin
BACKGROUND: Fragile X syndrome (FXS), a common cause of intellectual disability and autism, results from the expansion of a CGG-repeat tract in the 5' untranslated region of the FMR1 gene to >200 repeats. Such expanded alleles, known as full mutation (FM) alleles, are epigenetically silenced in differentiated cells thus resulting in the loss of FMRP, a protein important for learning and memory. The timing of repeat expansion and FMR1 gene silencing is controversial. METHODS: We monitored the repeat size and methylation status of FMR1 alleles with expanded CGG repeats in patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and embryonic stem cells (ESCs) that were grown for extended period of time either as stem cells or differentiated into neurons...
2016: Molecular Autism
Miranda Arnold, Rebecca Cross, Kaela S Singleton, Stephanie Zlatic, Christopher Chapleau, Ariana P Mullin, Isaiah Rolle, Carlene C Moore, Anne Theibert, Lucas Pozzo-Miller, Victor Faundez, Jennifer Larimore
AGAP1 is an Arf1 GTPase activating protein that interacts with the vesicle-associated protein complexes adaptor protein 3 (AP-3) and Biogenesis of Lysosome Related Organelles Complex-1 (BLOC-1). Overexpression of AGAP1 in non-neuronal cells results in an accumulation of endosomal cargoes, which suggests a role in endosome-dependent traffic. In addition, AGAP1 is a candidate susceptibility gene for two neurodevelopmental disorders, autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and schizophrenia (SZ); yet its localization and function in neurons have not been described...
2016: Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience
Samy L Habib, Noor Y Al-Obaidi, Maciej Nowacki, Katarzyna Pietkun, Barbara Zegarska, Tomasz Kloskowski, Wojciech Zegarski, Tomasz Drewa, Edward A Medina, Zhenze Zhao, Sitai Liang
Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant and multi-system genetic disorder in humans. TSC affects around 25,000 to 40,000 individuals in the United States and about 1 to 2 million individuals worldwide, with an estimated prevalence of one in 6,000 newborns. TSC occurs in all races and ethnic groups, and in both genders. TSC is caused by defects or mutations in two genes, TSC1 and TSC2. Loss of TSC1/TSC2 leads to dysregulation of mTOR, resulting in aberrant cell differentiation and development, and abnormal enlargement of cells...
2016: Journal of Cancer
Yun Tae Hwang, Solange Mabel Aliaga, Marta Arpone, David Francis, Xin Li, Belinda Chong, Howard Robert Slater, Carolyn Rogers, Lesley Bretherton, Matthew Hunter, Robert Heard, David Eugeny Godler
CGG repeat expansion >200 within FMR1, termed full mutation (FM), has been associated with promoter methylation, consequent silencing of gene expression and fragile X syndrome (FXS)-a common cause of intellectual disability and co-morbid autism. Unmethylated premutation (55-199 repeats) and FM alleles have been associated with fragile X related tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), a late onset neurodegenerative disorder. Here we present a 33-year-old male with FXS, with white matter changes and progressive deterioration in gait with cerebellar signs consistent with probable FXTAS; there was no evidence of any other cerebellar pathology...
October 1, 2016: American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A
Zhijun Yao, Bin Hu, Yuanwei Xie, Fang Zheng, Guangyao Liu, Xuejiao Chen, Weihao Zheng
Recently, studies based on time-varying functional connectivity have unveiled brain states diversity in some neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and major depressive disorder. However, time-varying functional connectivity analysis of resting-state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) have been rarely performed on the Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Hence, we performed time-varying connectivity analysis on resting-state fMRI data to investigate brain states mutation in ASD children. ASD showed an imbalance of connectivity state and aberrant ratio of connectivity with different strengths in the whole brain network, and decreased connectivity associated precuneus/posterior cingulate gyrus with medial prefrontal gyrus in default mode network...
2016: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
Omer Durak, Fan Gao, Yea Jin Kaeser-Woo, Richard Rueda, Anthony J Martorell, Alexi Nott, Carol Y Liu, L Ashley Watson, Li-Huei Tsai
De novo mutations in CHD8 are strongly associated with autism spectrum disorder, but the basic biology of CHD8 remains poorly understood. Here we report that Chd8 knockdown during cortical development results in defective neural progenitor proliferation and differentiation that ultimately manifests in abnormal neuronal morphology and behaviors in adult mice. Transcriptome analysis revealed that while Chd8 stimulates the transcription of cell cycle genes, it also precludes the induction of neural-specific genes by regulating the expression of PRC2 complex components...
October 3, 2016: Nature Neuroscience
Jessica J DeWitt, Nicole Grepo, Brent Wilkinson, Oleg V Evgrafov, James A Knowles, Daniel B Campbell
We previously identified the long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) MSNP1AS (moesin pseudogene 1, antisense) as a functional element revealed by genome wide significant association with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). MSNP1AS expression was increased in the postmortem cerebral cortex of individuals with ASD and particularly in individuals with the ASD-associated genetic markers on chromosome 5p14.1. Here, we mimicked the overexpression of MSNP1AS observed in postmortem ASD cerebral cortex in human neural progenitor cell lines to determine the impact on neurite complexity and gene expression...
2016: Genes
Federico Sicca, Elena Ambrosini, Maria Marchese, Luigi Sforna, Ilenio Servettini, Giulia Valvo, Maria Stefania Brignone, Angela Lanciotti, Francesca Moro, Alessandro Grottesi, Luigi Catacuzzeno, Sara Baldini, Sonia Hasan, Maria Cristina D'Adamo, Fabio Franciolini, Paola Molinari, Filippo M Santorelli, Mauro Pessia
Dysfunction of the inwardly-rectifying potassium channels Kir4.1 (KCNJ10) represents a pathogenic mechanism contributing to Autism-Epilepsy comorbidity. To define the role of Kir4.1 variants in the disorder, we sequenced KCNJ10 in a sample of affected individuals, and performed genotype-phenotype correlations. The effects of mutations on channel activity, protein trafficking, and astrocyte function were investigated in Xenopus laevis oocytes, and in human astrocytoma cell lines. An in vivo model of the disorder was also explored through generation of kcnj10a morphant zebrafish overexpressing the mutated human KCNJ10...
September 28, 2016: Scientific Reports
M S Alexander, M J Gasperini, P T Tsai, D E Gibbs, J M Spinazzola, J L Marshall, M J Feyder, M T Pletcher, E L P Chekler, C A Morris, M Sahin, J F Harms, C J Schmidt, R J Kleiman, L M Kunkel
Duchenne muscular dystrophy is caused by mutations in the DYSTROPHIN gene. Although primarily associated with muscle wasting, a significant portion of patients (approximately 25%) are also diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. We describe social behavioral deficits in dystrophin-deficient mice and present evidence of cerebellar deficits in cGMP production. We demonstrate therapeutic potential for selective inhibitors of the cGMP-specific PDE5A and PDE9A enzymes to restore social behaviors in dystrophin-deficient mice...
2016: Translational Psychiatry
Reymundo Lozano, Atoosa Azarang, Tanaporn Wilaisakditipakorn, Randi J Hagerman
The fragile X mental retardation 1 gene, which codes for the fragile X mental retardation 1 protein, usually has 5 to 40 CGG repeats in the 5' untranslated promoter. The full mutation is the almost always the cause of fragile X syndrome (FXS). The prevalence of FXS is about 1 in 4,000 to 1 in 7,000 in the general population although the prevalence varies in different regions of the world. FXS is the most common inherited cause of intellectual disability and autism. The understanding of the neurobiology of FXS has led to many targeted treatments, but none have cured this disorder...
August 2016: Intractable & Rare Diseases Research
Ryan N Doan, Byoung-Il Bae, Beatriz Cubelos, Cindy Chang, Amer A Hossain, Samira Al-Saad, Nahit M Mukaddes, Ozgur Oner, Muna Al-Saffar, Soher Balkhy, Generoso G Gascon, Marta Nieto, Christopher A Walsh
Comparative analyses have identified genomic regions potentially involved in human evolution but do not directly assess function. Human accelerated regions (HARs) represent conserved genomic loci with elevated divergence in humans. If some HARs regulate human-specific social and behavioral traits, then mutations would likely impact cognitive and social disorders. Strikingly, rare biallelic point mutations-identified by whole-genome and targeted "HAR-ome" sequencing-showed a significant excess in individuals with ASD whose parents share common ancestry compared to familial controls, suggesting a contribution in 5% of consanguineous ASD cases...
October 6, 2016: Cell
Xueshan Cao, Katsuhiko Tabuchi
Neurexins and neuroligins are two distinct families of single-pass transmembrane proteins localized at pre- and postsynapses, respectively. They trans-synaptically interact with each other and induce synapse formation and maturation. Common variants and rare mutations, including copy number variations, short deletions, and single or small nucleotide changes in neurexin and neuroligin genes have been linked to the neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). In this review, we summarize the structure and basic synaptic function of neurexins and neuroligins, followed by behaviors and synaptic phenotypes of knock-in and knock-out mouse of these family genes...
September 21, 2016: Neuroscience Research
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