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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30409767/usability-study-of-mainstream-wearable-fitness-devices-feature-analysis-and-system-usability-scale-evaluation
#1
Jun Liang, Deqiang Xian, Xingyu Liu, Jing Fu, Xingting Zhang, Buzhou Tang, Jianbo Lei
BACKGROUND: Wearable devices have the potential to promote a healthy lifestyle because of their real-time data monitoring capabilities. However, device usability is a critical factor that determines whether they will be adopted on a large scale. Usability studies on wearable devices are still scarce. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to compare the functions and attributes of seven mainstream wearable devices and to evaluate their usability. METHODS: The wearable devices selected were the Apple Watch, Samsung Gear S, Fitbit Surge, Jawbone Up3, Mi Band, Huawei Honor B2, and Misfit Shine...
November 8, 2018: JMIR MHealth and UHealth
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30103376/validation-of-the-apple-watch-for-heart-rate-variability-measurements-during-relax-and-mental-stress-in-healthy-subjects
#2
David Hernando, Surya Roca, Jorge Sancho, Álvaro Alesanco, Raquel Bailón
Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis is a noninvasive tool widely used to assess autonomic nervous system state. The market for wearable devices that measure the heart rate has grown exponentially, as well as their potential use for healthcare and wellbeing applications. Still, there is a lack of validation of these devices. In particular, this work aims to validate the Apple Watch in terms of HRV derived from the RR interval series provided by the device, both in temporal (HRM (mean heart rate), SDNN, RMSSD and pNN50) and frequency (low and high frequency powers, LF and HF) domain...
August 10, 2018: Sensors
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29887428/smart-watches-for-heart-rate-assessment-in-atrial-arrhythmias
#3
Anoop N Koshy, Jithin K Sajeev, Nitesh Nerlekar, Adam J Brown, Kevin Rajakariar, Mark Zureik, Michael C Wong, Louise Roberts, Maryann Street, Jennifer Cooke, Andrew W Teh
BACKGROUND: Despite studies demonstrating the accuracy of smart watches (SW) and wearable heart rate (HR) monitors in sinus rhythm, no data exists regarding their utility in arrhythmias. METHODS: 102 hospitalized patients were evaluated at rest using continuous electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring with concomitant SW-HR (FitBit, FB, Apple Watch, AW) for 30 min. RESULTS: Across all devices, 38,616 HR values were recorded. Sinus rhythm cohort demonstrated strong agreement for both devices with a low bias (FB & AW Bias = 1 beat)...
September 1, 2018: International Journal of Cardiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29650506/evaluating-the-validity-of-current-mainstream-wearable-devices-in-fitness-tracking-under-various-physical-activities-comparative-study
#4
Junqing Xie, Dong Wen, Lizhong Liang, Yuxi Jia, Li Gao, Jianbo Lei
BACKGROUND: Wearable devices have attracted much attention from the market in recent years for their fitness monitoring and other health-related metrics; however, the accuracy of fitness tracking results still plays a major role in health promotion. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of a host of latest wearable devices in measuring fitness-related indicators under various seminatural activities. METHODS: A total of 44 healthy subjects were recruited, and each subject was asked to simultaneously wear 6 devices (Apple Watch 2, Samsung Gear S3, Jawbone Up3, Fitbit Surge, Huawei Talk Band B3, and Xiaomi Mi Band 2) and 2 smartphone apps (Dongdong and Ledongli) to measure five major health indicators (heart rate, number of steps, distance, energy consumption, and sleep duration) under various activity states (resting, walking, running, cycling, and sleeping), which were then compared with the gold standard (manual measurements of the heart rate, number of steps, distance, and sleep, and energy consumption through oxygen consumption) and calculated to determine their respective mean absolute percentage errors (MAPEs)...
April 12, 2018: JMIR MHealth and UHealth
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29619803/measuring-the-validity-and-reliability-of-the-apple-watch-as-a-physical-activity-monitor
#5
Peng Zhang, Steven D Godin, Matthew V Owens
BACKGROUND: This study aimed to investigate the validity and reliability of the energy expenditure (EE) estimation of Apple Watch among college students. METHODS: Thirty college students completed two sets of three 10-minute treadmill walking and running trials while wearing three Apple Watches and being connected to indirect calorimetry. The walking trials were at speeds of 54, 80, and 107 m•min-1 while the running trials were at 134, 161, 188m•min-1. Energy expenditure comparisons were made using Two-way ANOVA with repeatedmeasures...
April 4, 2018: Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29420434/quality-of-life-in-patients-with-rectal-cancer-after-chemoradiation-watch-and-wait-policy-versus-standard-resection-are-we-comparing-apples-to-oranges
#6
COMMENT
Bruna Borba Vailati, Angelita Habr-Gama, Adrian E Mattacheo, Guilherme Pagin São Julião, Rodrigo Oliva Perez
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2018: Diseases of the Colon and Rectum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29210326/comparative-evaluation-of-heart-rate-based-monitors-apple-watch-vs-fitbit-charge-hr
#7
COMPARATIVE STUDY
Yang Bai, Paul Hibbing, Constantine Mantis, Gregory J Welk
The purpose of this investigation was to examine the validity of energy expenditure (EE), steps, and heart rate measured with the Apple Watch 1 and Fitbit Charge HR. Thirty-nine healthy adults wore the two monitors while completing a semi-structured activity protocol consisting of 20 minutes of sedentary activity, 25 minutes of aerobic exercise, and 25 minutes of light intensity physical activity. Criterion measures were obtained from an Oxycon Mobile for EE, a pedometer for steps, and a Polar heart rate strap worn on the chest for heart rate...
August 2018: Journal of Sports Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29189666/validity-of-wearable-activity-monitors-during-cycling-and-resistance-exercise
#8
Benjamin D Boudreaux, Edward P Hebert, Daniel B Hollander, Brian M Williams, Corinne L Cormier, Mildred R Naquin, Wynn W Gillan, Emily E Gusew, Robert R Kraemer
INTRODUCTION: The use of wearable activity monitors has seen rapid growth; however, the mode and intensity of exercise could affect the validity of heart rate (HR) and caloric (energy) expenditure (EE) readings. There is a lack of data regarding the validity of wearable activity monitors during graded cycling regimen and a standard resistance exercise. The present study determined the validity of eight monitors for HR compared with an ECG and seven monitors for EE compared with a metabolic analyzer during graded cycling and resistance exercise...
March 2018: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29187344/one-drop-mobile-on-iphone-and-apple-watch-an-evaluation-of-hba1c-improvement-associated-with-tracking-self-care
#9
Chandra Y Osborn, Joost R van Ginkel, David G Marrero, David Rodbard, Brian Huddleston, Jeff Dachis
BACKGROUND: The One Drop | Mobile app supports manual and passive (via HealthKit and One Drop's glucose meter) tracking of self-care and glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c ). OBJECTIVE: We assessed the HbA1c change of a sample of people with type 1 diabetes (T1D) or type 2 diabetes (T2D) using the One Drop | Mobile app on iPhone and Apple Watch, and tested relationships between self-care tracking with the app and HbA1c change. METHODS: In June 2017, we identified people with diabetes using the One Drop | Mobile app on iPhone and Apple Watch who entered two HbA1c measurements in the app 60 to 365 days apart...
November 29, 2017: JMIR MHealth and UHealth
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29173072/-social-networkout-connecting-social-features-of-wearable-fitness-trackers-with-physical-exercise
#10
Yaguang Zhu, Stephanie L Dailey, Daniel Kreitzberg, Jay Bernhardt
Despite widespread understanding of the benefits of physical activity, many adults in the United States do not meet recommended exercise guidelines. Burgeoning technologies, including wearable fitness trackers (e.g., Fitbit, Apple watch), bring new opportunities to influence physical activity by encouraging users to track and share physical activity data and compete against their peers. However, research has not explored the social processes that mediate the relationship between the use of wearable fitness trackers and intention to exercise...
December 2017: Journal of Health Communication
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29090987/the-validity-and-inter-device-variability-of-the-apple-watch%C3%A2-for-measuring-maximal-heart-rate
#11
Grant Abt, James Bray, Amanda Clare Benson
Maximal heart rate (HRmax ) is a fundamental measure used in exercise prescription. The Apple Watch™ measures heart rate yet the validity and inter-device variability of the device for measuring HRmax are unknown. Fifteen participants completed a maximal oxygen uptake test while wearing an Apple Watch™ on each wrist. Criterion HRmax was measured using a Polar T31™ chest strap. There were good to very good correlations between the watches and criterion (left: r = 0.87 [90%CI: 0.67 to 0.95]; right: r = 0...
July 2018: Journal of Sports Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29084262/press-touch-code-a-finger-press-based-screen-size-independent-authentication-scheme-for-smart-devices
#12
M S A Noman Ranak, Saiful Azad, Nur Nadiah Hanim Binti Mohd Nor, Kamal Z Zamli
Due to recent advancements and appealing applications, the purchase rate of smart devices is increasing at a higher rate. Parallely, the security related threats and attacks are also increasing at a greater ratio on these devices. As a result, a considerable number of attacks have been noted in the recent past. To resist these attacks, many password-based authentication schemes are proposed. However, most of these schemes are not screen size independent; whereas, smart devices come in different sizes. Specifically, they are not suitable for miniature smart devices due to the small screen size and/or lack of full sized keyboards...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28953837/emotionally-responsive-wearable-technology-and-stress-detection-for-affective-disorders
#13
Jenny Tillotson
As humans, we are born with no knowledge of odour. Our sense of smell is linked directly to the limbic system, the emotional part of our brain responsible for memory and behaviour, and therefore, our individual sense of smell is based purely on life's deep experiences and impressions. The roots of "Aromatherapy" can be traced back more than 3,500 years, to a time when essential oils were first recorded in human history for their therapeutic and medicinal properties. However, in the 21st century, it remains one of the most controversial complementary therapies applied in medicine because of its pseudoscience connotations and limited available data on health benefits, despite the importance of smell on human health...
September 2017: Psychiatria Danubina
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28914003/visual-fatigue-induced-by-viewing-a-tablet-computer-with-a-high-resolution-display
#14
Dong Ju Kim, Chi Yeon Lim, Namyi Gu, Choul Yong Park
PURPOSE: In the present study, the visual discomfort induced by smart mobile devices was assessed in normal and healthy adults. METHODS: Fifty-nine volunteers (age, 38.16 ± 10.23 years; male : female = 19 : 40) were exposed to tablet computer screen stimuli (iPad Air, Apple Inc.) for 1 hour. Participants watched a movie or played a computer game on the tablet computer. Visual fatigue and discomfort were assessed using an asthenopia questionnaire, tear film break-up time, and total ocular wavefront aberration before and after viewing smart mobile devices...
October 2017: Korean Journal of Ophthalmology: KJO
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28709155/variable-accuracy-of-wearable-heart-rate-monitors-during-aerobic-exercise
#15
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Stephen Gillinov, Muhammad Etiwy, Robert Wang, Gordon Blackburn, Dermot Phelan, A Marc Gillinov, Penny Houghtaling, Hoda Javadikasgari, Milind Y Desai
PURPOSE: Athletes and members of the public increasingly rely on wearable HR monitors to guide physical activity and training. The accuracy of newer, optically based monitors is unconfirmed. We sought to assess the accuracy of five optically based HR monitors during various types of aerobic exercise. METHODS: Fifty healthy adult volunteers (mean ± SD age = 38 ± 12 yr, 54% female) completed exercise protocols on a treadmill, a stationary bicycle, and an elliptical trainer (±arm movement)...
August 2017: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28538708/accuracy-in-wrist-worn-sensor-based-measurements-of-heart-rate-and-energy-expenditure-in-a-diverse-cohort
#16
Anna Shcherbina, C Mikael Mattsson, Daryl Waggott, Heidi Salisbury, Jeffrey W Christle, Trevor Hastie, Matthew T Wheeler, Euan A Ashley
The ability to measure physical activity through wrist-worn devices provides an opportunity for cardiovascular medicine. However, the accuracy of commercial devices is largely unknown. The aim of this work is to assess the accuracy of seven commercially available wrist-worn devices in estimating heart rate (HR) and energy expenditure (EE) and to propose a wearable sensor evaluation framework. We evaluated the Apple Watch, Basis Peak, Fitbit Surge, Microsoft Band, Mio Alpha 2, PulseOn, and Samsung Gear S2. Participants wore devices while being simultaneously assessed with continuous telemetry and indirect calorimetry while sitting, walking, running, and cycling...
May 24, 2017: Journal of Personalized Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28319983/reliability-and-validity-of-ten-consumer-activity-trackers-depend-on-walking-speed
#17
Tryntsje Fokkema, Thea J M Kooiman, Wim P Krijnen, Cees P VAN DER Schans, Martijn DE Groot
PURPOSE: To examine the test-retest reliability and validity of ten activity trackers for step counting at three different walking speeds. METHODS: Thirty-one healthy participants walked twice on a treadmill for 30 min while wearing 10 activity trackers (Polar Loop, Garmin Vivosmart, Fitbit Charge HR, Apple Watch Sport, Pebble Smartwatch, Samsung Gear S, Misfit Flash, Jawbone Up Move, Flyfit, and Moves). Participants walked three walking speeds for 10 min each; slow (3...
April 2017: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28302596/estimating-accuracy-at-exercise-intensities-a-comparative-study-of-self-monitoring-heart-rate-and-physical-activity-wearable-devices
#18
Erin E Dooley, Natalie M Golaszewski, John B Bartholomew
BACKGROUND: Physical activity tracking wearable devices have emerged as an increasingly popular method for consumers to assess their daily activity and calories expended. However, whether these wearable devices are valid at different levels of exercise intensity is unknown. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to examine heart rate (HR) and energy expenditure (EE) validity of 3 popular wrist-worn activity monitors at different exercise intensities. METHODS: A total of 62 participants (females: 58%, 36/62; nonwhite: 47% [13/62 Hispanic, 8/62 Asian, 7/62 black/ African American, 1/62 other]) wore the Apple Watch, Fitbit Charge HR, and Garmin Forerunner 225...
March 16, 2017: JMIR MHealth and UHealth
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28270382/evaluating-the-consistency-of-current-mainstream-wearable-devices-in-health-monitoring-a-comparison-under-free-living-conditions
#19
Dong Wen, Xingting Zhang, Xingyu Liu, Jianbo Lei
BACKGROUND: Wearable devices are gaining increasing market attention; however, the monitoring accuracy and consistency of the devices remains unknown. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the consistency of the monitoring measurements of the latest wearable devices in the state of normal activities to provide advice to the industry and support to consumers in making purchasing choices. METHODS: Ten pieces of representative wearable devices (2 smart watches, 4 smart bracelets of Chinese brands or foreign brands, and 4 mobile phone apps) were selected, and 5 subjects were employed to simultaneously use all the devices and the apps...
March 7, 2017: Journal of Medical Internet Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27979604/differences-in-behavior-and-brain-activity-during-hypothetical-and-real-choices
#20
REVIEW
Colin Camerer, Dean Mobbs
Real behaviors are binding consequential commitments to a course of action, such as harming another person, buying an Apple watch, or fleeing from danger. Cognitive scientists are generally interested in the psychological and neural processes that cause such real behavior. However, for practical reasons, many scientific studies measure behavior using only hypothetical or imagined stimuli. Generalizing from such studies to real behavior implicitly assumes that the processes underlying the two types of behavior are similar...
January 2017: Trends in Cognitive Sciences
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